Get The Latest Recruitment News
Impacting Your Industry

We know that the manufacturing and supply chain industries in Thailand are fast-paced and exciting.
Get all the latest news and updates that could impact your hiring or job search in our newsroom.

Filter:

Green Careers: Exploring Sustainability Job Opportunities in 2024
Feb
29
Green Careers: Exploring Sustainability Job Opportunities in 2024

Businesses are under pressure from both consumers and politicians to be more environmentally focused and sustainable. This shift is not just a trend; it's something we all need to do to take care of our planet. Industries like manufacturing, supply chain, and technical work are right in the middle of this change. They are developing innovative and creative ways to maintain the flow of goods and services we are used to in a globalised economy in a way that’s sustainable and better for the environment. Because of this there is demand for candidates with the skills and expertise within these sectors for sustainability job opportunities in Thailand in 2024. Promoting Sustainability in Thailand  Thailand’s government is increasingly committed to improving its environmental sustainability with ambitious targets for 50% of the country’s energy to be supplied by renewables by 2050. Stronger public commitment to sustainable practices is trickling through to industry and business development.   The Central Bank alongside the financial sector is developing policy designed to create a green financial ecosystem and increase the amount of investment, funding, and resources available for sustainable development across all industries, not just manufacturing, logistics and infrastructure.   What this means is that green job opportunities and sustainability careers are booming. This list will help you understand the types of sustainability job opportunities available.  The Role of Chief Sustainability Officer  With organisations increasingly focused on environmental issues and sustainability, it has become clear that for ESG strategies to work there needs to be clear leadership around these issues. Which is why the role of Chief Sustainability Officer is on the rise.   CSOs are now about more than just reducing risk and providing positive PR around sustainability. Instead, they take a key strategic role in defining company strategy, designing policy, and engaging with other senior leaders and stakeholders on this issue.   According to PwC, the number of CSOs tripled in 2021 and this trend shows no sign of slowing. For aspiring and experienced leaders looking for sustainability job opportunities that give them a seat at the boardroom table and the power to enact real change, Chief Sustainability Officer provides that chance.   Sustainable Manufacturing Jobs  Many sustainability job opportunities in manufacturing have been focused on Smart processes designed to reduce energy use while increasing efficiency; and exploring renewable energy sources that contribute to a cleaner and more sustainable production environment. There is also a drive to implement circular economy principles promoting the recycling and reusing of materials to reduce waste.   This transformation has opened new sustainable manufacturing jobs including in-demand roles such as:   Production Manager  Take charge of integrating sustainable practices into manufacturing processes by overseeing and implementing strategies like resource efficiency, waste reduction, and the adoption of green technologies.  Product Designer  Develop and craft products with a focus on environmental sustainability by incorporating eco-friendly materials, optimising energy efficiency, and designing products with a reduced environmental impact.  Renewable Energy Technician  Install, maintain, and repair renewable energy systems, such as solar panels or wind turbines to ensure their efficient operation and the generation of clean and sustainable energy.  Environmental Compliance Specialist  You will monitor operations, conduct audits, and develop strategies so that organisations are able to comply with environmental regulations and standards.  Sustainable Supply Chain Jobs  The average consumer company’s supply chain contributes to over 90% of its environmental impact. Advanced logistics technologies – such as route optimisation and real time tracking – alongside hybrid and electric vehicles can reduce fuel consumption and carbon emissions. Sustainable sourcing, packaging and circular economy principles can also encourage a more eco-conscious industry as well as being cost-effective.  Specific sustainable supply chain jobs include:   Supply Chain Analyst  By analysing supply chain and logistics data you will identify areas for improvement and develop strategies to improve environmental and social impacts throughout the supply chain process.   Logistics Coordinator You will oversee the implementation of transportation methods, sustainable packaging solutions, and green initiatives to achieve efficient movement of goods with minimal ecological footprint.  Carbon Footprint Analyst  By assessing various aspects of operations, conducting emissions inventories, and implementing strategies to reduce carbon footprints, you’ll help companies reach their environmental sustainability goals   Sustainable Sourcing Specialist  By assessing suppliers, establishing criteria, and fostering responsible partnerships you will work to ensure that materials and products are procured from suppliers committed to sustainable and ethical standards.  Explore more of the skills you’ll need to excel in today’s supply chain and logistics industry.   Green Careers in Digital Manufacturing   Using cutting-edge digital technologies – like automation, additive manufacturing, and data analytics – can make for more efficient operations and minimising waste. Digital solutions also promote remote monitoring and control for more efficient resource consumption.  Specific green job opportunities in digital manufacturing include:   Digital Manufacturing Engineer This role involves optimising manufacturing processes for minimal environmental impact, developing and implementing strategies for energy- and resource-efficient production, and collaborating to integrate sustainability across wider digital manufacturing practices.  Data Analyst for Smart Manufacturing  You will build and predictive analytics to identify opportunities for resource optimisation and equipment maintenance and implement data-driven strategies to reduce waste, energy consumption, and carbon footprint.   Digital Supply Chain Sustainability Specialist  With a focus on integrating digital technologies in the supply chain for sustainability, you will explore and implement blockchain and IoT solutions designed to improve supply chain transparency and reduce environmental impact and collaborate with suppliers and logistics partners to do the same.   Resource Manager  By specialising in identifying and implementing resource-efficient practices in digital manufacturing, you’ll develop and oversee programs to reduce material waste and energy consumption and implement circular economy principles in both design and production.  Sustainable Careers in Life Sciences  Companies are increasingly focused on developing sustainable approaches to pharmaceutical and biotechnological processes and green chemistry principles are gaining prominence in drug development and manufacturing. Biotechnologists are exploring processes that reduce resource consumption and waste in lab settings, while researchers are investigating innovative, environmentally conscious drug delivery systems, sustainable sourcing of materials and ethical practices.  Specific green roles in life sciences and pharmaceuticals include:   Pharmaceutical Researcher  You will research and develop eco-friendly processes for pharmaceutical manufacturing and more sustainable drug delivery systems to reduce environmental impact in drug development.  Biotechnologist   By exploring bio-based alternatives for traditionally resource-intensive processes you will develop, implement, and optimise biotechnological processes and techniques with a focus on sustainability, reducing waste and energy consumption.  Environmental Health and Safety Specialist  You’ll ensure compliance with environmental regulations, develop, and oversee programs for waste reduction and proper disposal and conduct risk assessments to minimise the environmental impact of life sciences facilities.  Healthcare Planner and Administrator  Your focus will be on implementing sustainable practices in healthcare facilities and organisations and collaborating with suppliers to source eco-friendly medical products and equipment.  Sustainability in Infrastructure  The push to achieve progress with sustainability in the infrastructure industry begins with key sustainability job opportunities in the production of renewable energy and green energy sources. There has been a major shift from producers and OEM’s to be less reliant on traditional fossil fuels in favour of nuclear, natural gas and green hydrogen as alternatives. Governments and investors have supported this transition too, pushing commitments to solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and other fuel sources like waste to energy.  Specific sustainability roles in infrastructure include:  Sustainable Architect and Urban Planner  You will design buildings and urban spaces with a focus on energy efficiency using renewables and green building principles like sustainable materials and construction practices.  Geotechnical Engineer  Through soil and rock analysis, foundation design, and risk assessment you’ll assess the stability and properties of the Earth's subsurface for construction projects, ensuring environmentally sound construction, minimising resource depletion, and promoting long-term structural resilience.  Renewable Energy Project Manager  Leading projects focused on the development and implementation of renewable energy infrastructure, you’ll coordinate with stakeholders, oversee construction, and conduct maintenance to ensure successful integration of sustainable energy sources into infrastructure projects.  Quality, Health, Safety & Environmental (QSHE) Engineer  A QSHE Engineer develops and implements quality management systems, ensuring compliance with health and safety regulations, and addresses environmental concerns by integrating sustainability practices for safer, healthier work environments that minimising environmental impact.  Are You Looking For a Sustainability Role in Thailand?  As Thailand's leading Industrial, Logistics and Supply Chain recruitment agency, we connect experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates with sustainability job opportunities across Thailand and Southeast Asia.  Learn more about how JacksonGrant’s can help you find a new role, or get in touch with a consultant to discuss your needs. 

View
Tech-Driven Career Success: Using AI to Help You Find a Job
Feb
21
Tech-Driven Career Success: Using AI to Help You Find a Job

Technology is having big impacts on how we live, work, and learn. Artificial Intelligence in particular looks set to change much about the world of work from the skills employers are looking for to the kinds of jobs we do. In fact, a recent study by the World Economic Forum in partnership with Chulalongkorn Business School has found that demand for AI led roles will increase as much as 30% by 2027. But AI isn’t just changing what employers are looking for from job seekers, it's changing things for candidates too! There are multiple ways of using AI to find a job.   Don’t believe us? Let’s explore the benefits of AI for job seekers and look at some tools you can use to make your job search more successful. Why You Should Use AI to Apply For Jobs  AI can be a great too for helping you find jobs that match your expectations and career goals, as well as making your job search less stressful. When you use AI to apply for jobs you can:  Apply for a larger number of roles  With AI helping you find roles and fill out applications you can apply for more jobs than you would on your own, broadening your reach.  Fill out applications faster  Because AI automates repetitive tasks, like writing emails, filling out application forms and writing and editing your CV you can save valuable time that you can use for other tasks like interview prep and networking.   Find job listings that are tailored to your skills and aspirations  Using AI you can search job boards for roles that match your skills, experience, and career development goals.  Get your CV noticed by hiring managers   Then when you’ve found the roles you are looking for, you can use AI to include keywords from the job adverts in your application, making it more likely to catch an employer’s eye.  As with all new tools and tech, when you are using AI to find a job it’s important to be mindful of its limitations as well. It’s important not to over-rely on AI as it can make your applications sound impersonal, and it can limit the opportunities you encounter. AI should be used alongside other job search strategies for best results! JacksonGrant’s 5 Best AI Tools For Job Seekers  There are multiple ways AI tools can be used to help support your job search, helping you find roles that match your skills and experience faster and ensuring you are more successful at every stage of the hiring process. Here are our top tools for using AI to find a job:  Improve Your CV One of the most common pieces of job-hunting advice is to tailor your CV for every role, which can be time consuming especially if you are applying for lots of jobs. Luckily AI can do the hard work for you. Using generative AI tools you can analyse your CV, get suggestions for improvements, and even identify keywords and phrases relevant to your target job, improving the chances of getting through to an interview. JacksonGrant’s recommended CV analyser is Jobscan. Get Personalised Job Recommendations Save yourself some scrolling and use AI-driven job platforms that review hundreds of job postings and recommend those that match your skills, experience, and preferences. These platforms use machine learning algorithms to match your profile with relevant job opportunities. You can even filter by things like benefits, values, and cultural fit.  Prepare For Your Interview  Interviews can be a nerve-wracking experience even if you are a confident speaker. AI interview preparation tools that simulate real interview scenarios can help you practice and have answers ready for those tough questions. They do this by looking at your responses, giving feedback, and valuable insights on your communication style and interview skills. JacksonGrant’s recommended AI interview preparation tool is Google Interview Warmup. Network More Effectively As well as using AI to find a job opening, you can also use AI tools to improve your networking, increasing the likelihood of being recommended for roles in the future. There are over 277 million LinkedIn users in the Asia-Pacific region alone. AI can suggest the profiles of people you should connect with based on your shared interests, industries, or career paths. They can even automate other aspects of networking like crafting connection requests, scheduling meetings or following up with contacts.JacksonGrant’s recommended AI networking tool is this GPT for Google Sheets add on that can create personalised outreach emails in bulk.   Improve Your Skills Want to know what areas you can work on to land your dream role? AI can be used to assess your current skill set and give advice on areas for improvement based on current market trends and job requirements. These tools may even suggest online courses, certifications, or training programs to help you stay competitive in your industry and target job market. JacksonGrant’s recommended AI skill builder is Practica.  Using AI to find a job can really make a difference. It helps speed up the application process, gives personalised job suggestions, and overall improves your job search. By staying informed and being careful, you can make the most out of AI tools for a smoother job search. Embracing technology in your job hunt is not just a trend but a smart way to navigate the changing job market. So, consider exploring AI tools to boost your chances of finding the right job effectively. Looking For a New Role in One of Thailand’s Technical Industries?  As Thailand's leading Industrial, Logistics and Supply Chain recruitment agency, we connect experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates like you with their perfect roles across Thailand and Southeast Asia.  Learn more about how JacksonGrant’s can help you find a new role, or get in touch with a consultant to discuss your needs. 

View
Build The Right Workforce In 2024 With These New Recruitment and Retention Strategies
Jan
16
Build The Right Workforce In 2024 With These New Recruitment and Retention Strategies

Is your current workforce able to meet and maintain the high standards of growth you set for your business? And can you source and attract the right candidates to overcome potential challenges and achieve new high in 2024?  Rapid advancements in technology, coupled with the changing demands of an uncertain have made hiring and talent retention in the technical, engineering and manufacturing sectors increasingly challenging. As the government continues to court international business investment to meet its target of growing the Thailand’s economy by 5% year on year, the need for candidates with specialised skills is higher than ever and retaining valuable expertise is crucial as businesses aim to stay competitive and innovative.  Only by regularly reviewing and adapting your recruitment and retention strategies can you keep with shifting demands and drive your company’s success forward. How Today’s Job Market Affects Workforce Planning Thailand is exceptionally well-placed to take advantage of global demand for new products and services. As a logistics hub it plays a central role in supply chains across the Asia-Pacific region and beyond and many big name electrical, automotive, and pharmaceutical manufacturers are investing heavily. But taking advantage of this new position is not without its challenges for both local and international businesses. The global supply chain and manufacturing industries are increasingly interconnected and market trends, economic ups-and-downs and political dynamics all have the potential to disrupt trade and production.  The adoption of new technologies, such as machine learning, additive manufacturing and sustainable fuels has increased the demand for specialised skills which local populations may be ill-equipped to meet. The manufacturing and logistics industries are already experiencing a significant digital skills gap. An influx of international businesses from the US, UK and Europe has meant English language skills are also desirable. Companies that fail to be proactive in their search for key skills can face a range of negative consequences such as poor growth, reputational damage, and increased recruitment costs. New Recruitment and Retention Strategies for 2024 Which is why it’s important for businesses to adapt to new trends in hiring and switch up their recruitment and retention strategies as we head into the new year. Who knows what 2024 will bring for your business. Whether you are actively hiring now, or not, these strategies will help you build your reputation as an employer or choice, so when the time comes you can reach the right candidates and keep them happy and engaged:  1. Develop New Talent Pools By diversifying your recruitment channels and building relationships with universities, schools, and professional institutions you can proactively develop talent pipelines that will make your hiring more efficient in the longer term. Establishing partnerships like this helps bridge the gap between you and skilled graduates and broaden your talent search. Organizing industry specific workshops, internships and seminars helps create a pool of candidates with valuable hands-on experience. Candidate’s will also begin to think of you as an employer of choice when it comes to making career moves.  2.    Build Your Employer Brand & Employee Value Proposition How candidates perceive you is an important factor in your recruitment and retention strategy. To begin building your employer brand you should start by creating an Employee Value Proposition (EVP) that speaks to the candidates you are trying to attract. Focus on what makes your company culture unique, what growth opportunities you offer and your commitment to innovation and employee well-being. To communicate your brand and EVP to candidates you can showcase them on your company website through engaging content such as employee testimonials, behind-the-scenes glimpses, and success stories. Actively participating in industry events, sponsoring educational programs and collaborating with the local communities also contribute to a positive employer brand. 3.    Implementing Employee Development and Training Programs To keep up with technological advancements, employees need to acquire new skills and adapt to evolving tools and methodologies. Employers can help this growth by providing effective training initiatives, such as workshops, online courses, and hands-on practical sessions tailored to industry needs. Investing in employee growth and knowledge enhancement not only keeps the workforce competent and prevents skills gaps but also makes talent attraction and retention easier. When employees see a commitment to their professional development, they are more likely to stay with the company, leading to improved retention rates. Moreover, a skilled and knowledgeable workforce attracts equally skilled talent, making your business more appealing to prospective employees. 4.    Benchmarking Your Compensation and Benefits Packages Revitalize your recruitment and retention strategy with salary benchmarking, a vital tool in today's competitive job market. When you understand industry standards and trends in compensation packages, you can align your offerings with market rates, ensuring they remain attractive to top talent. By benchmarking packages against wider compensation trends in the technical, engineering, and manufacturing sectors, as well as other businesses in Thailand you tailor attractive benefits that appeal to skilled professional and fosters loyalty amongst your current employees contributing significantly to your ability to attract, retain, and motivate a high-performing workforce. 5.    Using Workforce Analytics Advanced workforce analytics can identify patterns and trends within your hiring processes, gather intelligence and map the talent market helping you to make more informed decisions. By analysing factors such as employee turnover rates, performance metrics, and demographic data, you gain valuable insights into what drives employee satisfaction and retention. Analytics can also highlight successful hiring channels and predict candidate success based on historical data. This information can help you refine and adapt your recruitment processes, target suitable candidates effectively, and tailor retention initiatives for the best hiring outcomes.  All these strategies are part of JacksonGrant’s innovative Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) model that includes the best elements of Recruitment Process Outsourcing, Project Recruitment and Executive Search. JacksonGrant works with you as a long-term strategic partner to make your hiring more efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable. Remember, we are as invested in the future of your business as you are and RaaS is designed to ensure you always have the skilled, motivated, and dedicated team you need to thrive in the years to come. As Thailand's leading Industrial, Logistic and Supply Chain recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements

View
Hiring in the New Year? Here are 5 ways to improve candidate experience when recruiting
Jan
7
Hiring in the New Year? Here are 5 ways to improve candidate experience when recruiting

Think back on your past experiences of job hunting. You most likely had some negative experiences as well as some positive ones. Even many years later a bad experience with a company might colour how you think about them as a business, and whether you’d consider applying to a role with them again now! A great candidate experience involves creating a journey that is smooth, efficient, and engaging, leaving candidates with a favourable impression of the company regardless of the final hiring decision. What Is Candidate Experience? Put simply, candidate experience is how a candidate perceives your business during and after the application process. Every single interaction an applicant has, from how they find your job description to how you communicate your final hiring decision, can influence a candidate’s overall experience with you. Every stage of the recruitment process is important, and you should carefully consider how each step could impact candidate experience. You should be aiming for positive, transparent, and respectful interactions throughout the entire recruitment process. Importance of Candidate Experience Candidate experience should be an important part of your employer brand and your wider recruitment strategy. A positive candidate experience can help improve your ability to attract and retain highly qualified candidates. Candidates are more likely to accept offers from employers who provide positive experiences. This can be key if you are competing for highly skilled candidates who may receive multiple offers. Candidates share their experiences with their networks. Good or bad. Positive experiences will encourage others to apply to you, making it easier for you to fill future roles. Even if candidates are successful, those with bad recruitment experiences are less likely to stay in their roles. Meaning extra time and resources spent on finding replacements.  5 Ways to Improve Candidate Experience Before you start to make improvements to your recruitment processes make sure you understand exactly what candidates experience right now. You can do this by mapping the candidate journey, step by step, from the moment they arrive at your job description to the point they receive an offer. Ask yourself how easy it was to apply? Did you encounter any challenges or frustrations? Are candidates kept informed throughout the process? Would you recommend your company to others based on your experience? Once you have the answers to these questions you can begin to: Simplify the Application ProcessSending in an application is the first contact most candidates will have with your company. Which means the process needs to be simple, quick, and user-friendly. Recent studies have found that up to 92% of online applications are never completed. Make sure your application portal or website is mobile friendly and ask for essential information only by removing any unnecessary fields. You might also consider adding a progress bar or tracker to help guide people through the process. The aim is to eliminate any frustration or confusion. By doing this you increase the number of completed applications and show that you respect candidates time and effort. Communicate Effectively Throughout Timely updates and clear information help applicants manage expectations, reduce anxiety, and feel respected, regardless of the outcome. You can achieve this by establishing clear communication channels and setting realistic timelines for each stage of the hiring process. Automated responses acknowledging receipt of applications and providing expected timelines for follow-ups create transparency and maintain engagement. You can manage this through email or through your ATS system. Finally giving constructive feedback, even in cases of rejection, helps candidates understand the decision-making process and maintain a positive relationship. Show Off Company Culture and ValuesProviding insights into your workplace culture gives candidates a sense of who you are and helps them determine if they’ll be a good fit. You can demonstrate your culture and values through your job descriptions, and on your company websites. But they should also be built into your communications and processes. You can get creative too. Use your job site and social media to host video office tours, interviews with current employees and showcase any learning and development programs you offer. Improve OnboardingThe final stage in a candidate’s journey should start from the moment a candidate accepts your offer. This means doing more than simply setting up payroll and directing them to the office.  A well-executed onboarding process helps success candidates transition into their new role, become productive members of your team and help them feel as though they belong. A positive introduction significantly impacts job satisfaction, retention rates, and overall employee performance. You can create a successful onboarding program that gives in-depth insights into company values and expectations by offering clear guidance on organisational processes, tools, and resources, creating clear timelines and goals, and assigning mentors or implementing buddy systems helps new hires integrate into the team. Gather and Implement FeedbackBy actively seeking input from candidates, you’ll gain valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of your hiring procedures and how candidates experience them. Asking for feedback once again shows you’re committed to transparency and accountability, and it gives you the opportunity to refine your hiring process for even better outcomes. Make sure that you take the time to review the feedback you gather and implement any suggestions or changes that come out of it. By putting candidates at the centre of your recruitment processes you’ll not only be able to attract top talent but also develop engaged, happy new hires who’ll want to commit to your organisation long term. As Thailand's leading Industrial, Logistic and Supply Chain recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
Supply Chain Innovation: The Skills You Need to Thrive in Today's Market
Nov
27
Supply Chain Innovation: The Skills You Need to Thrive in Today's Market

Thailand has a vibrant and innovative supply chain and logistics sector that, thanks to foreign and government investment, has quickly adapted to changing market conditions. Exciting infrastructure and technology projects like TMX Global’s metaverse and the Laem Chabang port development upgrade mean that the region continues to be an attractive one for supply chain and logistics businesses and professionals alike. But, if this growth is to continue, companies will need to attract and retain candidates with the logistics and supply chain management skills capable of taking them into the future.  Logistics & Supply Chain Management Skills for 2024 With that in mind, let’s explore the most impactful logistics and supply chain management skills companies will be looking for to succeed in the year ahead: •    Data and Analytics As data becomes more embedded into everyday business practices, companies will be hoping to use the information they can gather to increase supply chain resilience and drive other innovations like sustainability, responsible sourcing, traceability, and real-time tracking. For this reason, it is increasingly important that data is clean and well governed. Companies should be looking for candidates with exceptional data management skills across the board as well as predictive analytics experts with an in-depth knowledge of regulations and data compliance issues.   •    Artificial Intelligence Digitalisation in shipping and supply chain continues with AI and automation set to improve real-time tracking and visibility. While larger shipping and logistics companies went digital faster, this year we’ll see this become a reality for smaller boutique companies. To do so they’ll need employees with well-rounded digital skillsets that include automation, AI, machine learning and robotics.  •    ERG and Sustainability Following COP26 there is increasing pressure on international supply chain, logistics and shipping industries to achieve net-zero by 2050. If the sector is to achieve that goal and meet ambitious emissions targets set by the Thai government then businesses will have to adopt greener business practices such as paperless shipping, circular supply chains and green fuels. Also, warehouse facilities will need to be run more sustainably, reducing energy usage and with more focus on renewable energy sources. As a result, leading employers will be looking for candidates with skills in electrical engineering, supply chain management and experience with electric vehicles and alternative fuels. So far, we’ve looked at the technical skills needed for logistics and supply chain management. But soft skills will be valuable going forward as well. Skills like: •    Collaboration Changes to supply chains, a need for real-time tracking and visibility and more consumer demand for faster shipping and delivery requires greater collaboration with suppliers, co-manufacturers, customers, carriers, and distributors. Professionals will need excellent time-management and team working skills to develop collaborative workflows and unify processes and systems to reduce errors and inefficiencies, lower costs and eliminate information time lags.  •    Problem-solvingAn ability to troubleshoot and find innovative solutions is invaluable in optimizing supply chain processes and maintaining seamless logistics operations. Complex challenges and unexpected issues such as delivery delays or inventory discrepancies are inevitable. Individuals’ who are adept at problem-solving can identify issues, discover the root causes, and implement effective solutions, ensuring streamlined operations and customer satisfaction. •    AdaptabilityAs we all know the global supply chain can be affected by everything from economic fluctuations, political events and even the weather. Adaptable individuals can swiftly adjust to new tools, methodologies, and market trends and thrive in dynamic environments. Their flexibility means they can embrace change, adjusting strategies promptly and ensuring that supply chain operations remain agile and responsive to evolving customer demands and industry trends, fostering resilience and long-term success. How To Develop These Skills & Improve Your CV For supply chain and logistics professionals who want to keep their skills and expertise up to date here are four key pieces of advice for how to develop new skills and improve your CV: Go through your current CV and look for any gaps or differences between your skillset and the new skills employers are looking for. Research potential learning opportunities like courses, online tutorials, podcasts, forums, or professional associations and sign up! Talk to your current line manager and ask for opportunities to develop key soft skills or take on more responsibility in your current role. You might put yourself forward for a project, offer to onboard a new colleague or even shadow a different department. Seek out a mentor in your field of interest who can share their experiences, provide guidance and support, and help you navigate your personal development. How To Spot Candidates With The Right Skills Identifying candidates with the right skills is essential for any employer. When reviewing CVs and conducting interviews, consider the following strategies to spot candidates with the right skills: Use relevant keywords in your job description Rather than just listing the responsibilities of a role, use relevant keywords in your job descriptions. This will help the right candidates find the role and you can screen their CVs for matching keywords. Consider skills-based hiring methodsSkills-based hiring techniques involve using structured interview questions to determine whether candidates are able to apply their knowledge to real-world or industry specific situations.  Target specific talent pools and passive candidatesIf you are struggling to attract candidates with the skills that match your needs you might consider expanding your search into new or overlooked talent pools, or using new sourcing methods such as targeting candidates who are not actively job hunting or asking your current workforce for referrals.  Look for candidates who are proactive about professional developmentEven if a candidate does not have all the skills you are looking for, those who have shown a proactive approach to their own professional development are more likely to learn new skills and adapt to changing technologies and ways of working. Hiring Or Applying for Supply Chain and Logistics Roles? As Thailand's leading Industrial, Logistic and Supply Chain recruitment agency, we connect business with experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates across Thailand and Southeast Asia. Whether you’re a supply chain employer or a candidate, we can help you take advantage of the current market, grow your business, or progress your career.  Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering, find a new role, or get in touch with a consultant to discuss your needs.

View
Words To Live By: “Do More With Less” Efficiency is the hallmark of a good recruiter
Nov
20
Words To Live By: “Do More With Less” Efficiency is the hallmark of a good recruiter

By Sureeporn ‘Pui’ Thumvachiraporn, JacksonGrant Director of Customer Success We’ve painted motivational quotes on the walls of our office at JacksonGrant. The slogan "Do More with Less" appeals to me the most. In today's fast-paced world, effective time management is a crucial skill. It is especially relevant to recruiting. Use Your Time Wisely Speed is important: recruiting is race, and the most efficient recruiter will win. Recruiters are in constant competition with other agencies to find the best short-list candidates. Richard Jackson, our managing director, wants us all to work more efficiently so that we spend less time searching for candidates, and more time closing placements. If a recruiter knows exactly what kind of candidate we need to find, and if the job description is precisely written, it will save time sorting through candidate resumès. If we narrow down the pool of target resumes, we may short-list fewer candidates than the competition. But if we are confident that we have three or four really strong candidates who are qualified for the position and a good fit for the client, that’s enough. By narrowing the field, we save time on every job search. That is time saved for the recruiter, for our company, and the client. By working more efficiently in this way, we’ll have more time to search for other positions, and by year’s end we will place more candidates. Efficient work habits have a cumulative effect, and ultimately lead to greater success. How to Work More Efficiently The “Do More With Less” philosophy encourages us to find ways to increase productivity without burning ourselves out. Here are a four practical techniques to help you become more efficient and organised. Make a To-Do List: One of the most fundamental techniques for efficient time management is composing a to-do list. Write down the tasks you need to accomplish each day and allocate specific time slots for each task. This simple practice helps prioritise the most urgent tasks, and identify the jobs that need immediate attention. For tasks that require a significant amount of time, consider breaking them down into smaller, more manageable segments.  Focus on Your Strengths: Begin your day by tackling tasks that align with your strengths and interests. You will complete these tasks more quickly, and it will build momentum with a feeling of satisfaction. Once you've successfully completed the items that fall within your comfort zone, you'll find that you have more time and mental energy to tackle more challenging endeavours. This step-by-step approach keeps you motivated and boosts overall productivity. Prioritise Important Tasks: The most urgent and important tasks must be prioritised above all others. Dedicate your full attention, energy, and time to the most critical aspects of your job. Focusing our efforts can lead to significant achievements and positive changes in your work habits. Start your day by tackling high-priority matters and leaving less crucial items for later. This way, we ensure that we handle our most important responsibilities when we are fresh and most focused.  Utilise Technology for Greater Efficiency: Embrace technology! It’s a valuable tool to organise and manage our workload. Calendars, task management apps, and other digital tools can significantly streamline your workflow. Set reminders and use automated features to make sure nothing is overlooked. This tech-savvy approach helps you stay on top of your responsibilities and allocates your time effectively. Work Smarter Productivity isn't solely about working harder, it's about working smarter. If you work smarter, you can still have time for yourself, and achieve a healthier work-life balance. The "Do More with Less" approach helps us set priorities: leverage your strengths, tackle important tasks first, and utilise technology to increase efficiency. By incorporating these straightforward techniques into your routine, you can strike a balance between professional success and a fulfilling personal life. True success lies in effective work, not just hard work. Prioritise wisely, and you will see a significant boost in your productivity levels. Do you need help filling an important role with your company? We can help with all your recruitment needs. Please reach out to me sureeporn@jacksongrant.io

View
Look Before You Leap!
Nov
13
Look Before You Leap!

Maximise your chances of success: Before you start looking for a new job, think it over carefully. Make a plan first, to ensure a smooth transition and a happy outcome. It’s important to be proactive about any career moves you intend to make. In fact, you should prepare for the job-hunting process long before you begin to search for new opportunities. Establishing a relationship with a recruiter you trust and get along with will help immensely in this regard. It is a major advantage if your recruiter specializes in your industry sector or job function, as they will know about trends and new opportunities. Ask the Right Questions If you are unsatisfied at your current job, you need to be aware of what precisely is the source of your discontent. Think about what you want to change. What do you want? Or, quite often it is more to the point to ask yourself: What don’t you want? Find out if it is possible to achieve your goals where you are working now. If you can get what you want at your current job, you should consider staying put. It is advisable to explore the possibilities for career advancement internally before looking elsewhere. This may involve putting out some discreet feelers with colleagues to ascertain where you stand with management, to determine if you are pushing up against a glass ceiling, or if there may be a new project on the horizon that could be interesting and make it worthwhile to stay a bit longer. Talk it Over with Your Manager Depending on your situation, it may be possible to have a frank conversation with your manager about future prospects. If circumstances allow, you could approach your boss. Explain that you’re feeling unchallenged, and ask: what does the roadmap look like for me, in next six months to one year? You might be pleasantly surprised: If they want to keep you, the company may accommodate your request for a more challenging assignment. This is a delicate manoeuvre, and it’s not for everyone. I certainly am not suggesting you tell your manager that you are looking for the exit. That could have unintended consequences that may not benefit you. But if you have a solid relationship with your boss, and you are confident about your position in the company, it could be helpful. Don’t give an ultimatum, or tip your hand: just try to get insights that will help you make a more informed decision about your future. Once you’ve done this, you’ll at least have more clarity about your future prospects. And you’ll have a better idea about whether it’s time to leave. If your current employer can’t give you what you want, it’s time to make a move. Put Pen to Paper First and foremost, candidates should be clear – with themselves – about what is negotiable and non-negotiable. I recommend writing down what you want and don’t want. What are the elements your new job must have, and what do you refuse to accept? Often, you’ll find some items on the list are contradictory. Many times, a candidate has told me they’re willing to commute up to 1.5 hours for the right salary. A few moments later they’ll be talking about the importance of a work-life balance. Reach Out to a Recruiter Quite often I will meet with prospective candidates whom I may have spoken with on the phone a few times. After a long cup of coffee, we may decide the best thing to do is stay at their current job. That doesn’t mean we’ve wasted our time. The relationship we’ve established can be used in the future. A lot of placements I make are for candidates who I’ve known for a year or more. I check in with them routinely. We discuss how things are going with their career, with their personal lives. I let them know about developments and opportunities in their particular industry. Again, this gives us a higher degree of clarity: when the time comes to make a move, when an opportunity presents itself, we’ll know the time is right, and there won’t be any second-guessing. Maybe a prospect will be in line for a promotion or a new project at his current position. I’ll say: “Ok that sounds great. Finish managing that project successfully, then let’s talk after 6 months.” When the project is completed, maybe that person has more skills, and their resume looks more impressive. Alternatively, maybe things didn’t work out as they hoped; now they definitely know the time has come to look for a new job. Find a recruiter you like, who makes you feel comfortable. They should specialise in finding jobs for people with your skill set, or in your industry. Make a plan with your recruiter, and a timeline. Establish clear parameters of what you are looking for. Update your CV. Discuss what you are looking for, in terms of salary expectation, work culture, career advancement. Make sure that what you’re looking for is realistic. A recruiter with specialised knowledge of your particular industry can confirm whether your expectations are reasonable and achievable given present market conditions. Plan and Prepare for the Job-Seeking Process Here’s what doesn’t work, but it happens all too often: A candidate has a bad day at work. They’ll go online and browse job boards, apply for a few positions. Maybe they get an interview. Afterwards, they get an offer that they’re not fully prepared to consider. Then it becomes a case of ‘What do I do now?’ It’s important to plan to achieve the desired result. If candidates prepare themselves to go through the process, that planning will inevitably create more successful outcomes, both in terms of achieving long-term success in a new job, as well as making the transition a lot easier. A competent recruiter can help with interview preparation, salary negotiation, how to handle the timing of your resignation from your old job, and prepare you for the onboarding process for your new role. The entire process of changing jobs is stressful. It puts us through emotional upheaval. This is part of what a recruiter can help with. For us, this is familiar territory, we deal with it every day. You need someone to accompany you on this path. Trust me, you don’t want to go it alone. It is daunting and potentially disruptive to your life. You’ll need support along the way, both from family, friends and a professional recruiter. If you think it may be time to make a career move, please reach out me to me on LinkedIn.

View
5 Narcissistic traits that help me as a recruiter
Nov
6
5 Narcissistic traits that help me as a recruiter

While reading Greg Savage’s book there was a statement made which really stood out to me which said that the best recruiters are obsessed with making the perfect match. They are not concerned primarily about the money that they will make nor are they totally concerned about closing the job as quickly as possible but they are obsessed about getting the right candidate for the client and helping the candidate to choose the best path for their career. When I read this it really resonated with me as this is my primary approach to all recruitment activities that I do. I realized that I am indeed obsessed with finding this match. Why you may ask? For this you need to delve deeper into the psyche of the recruiter; in this instance it’s me. Truthfully speaking I have several traits of a narcissist. Luckily these traits are not dominated in the negative aspect the first trait I have is: 1.   The need for control I want to be the best. I want to be right. I want to be the most competent. I want to do everything the correct way. I want to own the process and I want to have a sense of control in the recruitment process. Actually, I want total control of the process. Why? I believe that if I have full control of the process I can make sure that the process is completed in a correct manner. 2.   The need for perfection The second trait that I have is that I want everything to be perfect! I want the events to happen as I expect them to and I want the situation to play out precisely as I envision. To make sure that this happens it is imperative that I complete my work correctly which includes research, market mapping, candidate approach, candidate introduction, candidate behavior based interviews and really analyzing the candidates motivations and the motivation to accept an opportunity.  3.     Being afraid of being ridiculed The third trait that I have is I'm afraid of being ridiculed, rejected, being wrong or somebody betraying me. This is one of the other reasons why I'm so meticulous in the work that I do.  4.     Self importance When I do a good job and the client is happy with what I've done plus making the candidate very happy in their career choice this gives me an overall feeling of self-importance. I know this sounds really negative but it makes me feel good and this is what really gives me the motivation to keep on recruiting. It's almost like a drug and it's one that I always enjoy taking.  5.   Disconnect emotionally The final trait that I have as a narcissist is the ability to disconnect emotionally with the work that I do. For example, if things go wrong I'm able to see the logic in it not the emotion in it and move on quickly to find the next win. I can analyse where it went wrong and I care about correcting any mistakes.  Are these the traits of a top billing recruiter? How many out there in recruitment can identify with these? Who thinks these are negative?  For more follow me on Linkedin and the JacksonGrant website at https://www.jacksongrant.io/.

View
Revolutionising Talent Acquisition: The Advantages of Recruitment-as-a-Service
Oct
23
Revolutionising Talent Acquisition: The Advantages of Recruitment-as-a-Service

Is your traditional recruitment model  failing to help you source the candidates and skills you need for success? Maybe the skills you are hiring for are changing - 53% of business leaders are expanding into new markets requiring new skills and expertise. Or perhaps, like 28% of Thai businesses, you are looking to expand your workforce this year?  Enter Recruitment-as-a-Service (RaaS), a transformative concept that offers a tailored solution to these challenges. JacksonGrant’s RaaS solution is an exclusive partnership that offers a holistic and comprehensive talent acquisition strategy, personalised to your unique needs.  Our Recruitment-as-a-Service solution provides our partners with a fully embedded talent solution that provides more efficient, cost-effective talent acquisition. In fact, our clients have saved 50%+ on existing recruitment support, reduced time-to-fill to less than 20 days and increased stick rates to over 85%. All while receiving strategic talent acquisition support and market mapping designed to build sustainable talent pools. What is Recruitment-as-a-Service? JacksonGrant’s Recruitment-as-a-Service model combines elements of Recruitment Process Outsourcing, Project Recruitment and Executive Search. This means we not only provide all the services outsourcing your recruitment would be expected to provide – sourcing and assessing applicants, managing the interview process, and communicating with successful candidates – but we use our expertise and tech stack to create a long-term recruitment strategy that supports your business into the future. You’ll also receive:   A dedicated account manager to provide strategic input  Access to a team of recruiters 100% focused on your requirements  Flexible KPIs based on your needs  Customisable commercial terms and fee structures Regular review meetings for feedback Data analytics pinpointing areas for improvement We always seek to integrate our industry insights, market know-how and best practice with analytics that make your hiring more efficient, cost-effective, and sustainable. Meaning you can always find the talent you need.  6 Advantages Recruitment-as-a-Service can bring to your business  Simply sourcing and attracting talent is only one benefit of RaaS. This innovative recruitment model can bring other advantages too, such as: 1.    Cost reductionWhen partnering with a RaaS provider, you benefit from a more efficient and streamlined hiring process. Dedicated recruiters work exclusively on your talent acquisition needs, ensuring a concentrated effort to find the best-fit candidates. This eliminates the need to engage multiple agencies or maintain an in-house recruitment team, both of which can be costly endeavours. As a result, RaaS not only minimises the expenses associated with various recruitment methods but also maximizes your return on investment by efficiently securing top talent. 2.    Time savingsWith exclusive focus on your talent acquisition needs, RaaS providers can quickly source, screen, and onboard candidates, effectively shortening the time-to-hire. This agility is especially valuable for filling critical roles promptly, ensuring that your organisation can adapt to changing market demands, capitalise on growth opportunities, and maintain optimal staffing levels. Ultimately, RaaS empowers your business with the efficiency needed to secure talent without unnecessary delays, make you more agile and competitive in your industry. 3.    ScalabilityWhether you find yourself in a growth phase, requiring rapid expansion of your workforce, or facing the need for downsizing due to market fluctuations, a RaaS partnership can seamlessly adapt to meet your evolving staffing needs. This adaptability is a game-changer, as it allows you to respond quickly to changing market conditions without the headache of reconfiguring your recruitment strategy or engaging in lengthy hiring processes. With RaaS, you can efficiently scale your recruitment efforts up or down as required, ensuring that your workforce remains agile and perfectly aligned with your business goals. 4.    Better quality of hireBecause RaaS providers meticulously tailor their candidate searches to align with the unique culture, values, and specific requirements of your business you receive a pool of candidates who not only possess the right technical skills but also exhibit a strong cultural fit, driving higher employee retention rates and overall job satisfaction. This personalised approach to recruitment alongside the screening processes used ensures that candidates are thoroughly vetted, leading to better-quality employees who will positively impact company performance and long-term success. 5.    Access to expertise Collaborating with a Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) provider opens the door to a wealth of recruitment expertise and cutting-edge technology. Seasoned recruiters with an in-depth understanding of your industry's unique talent landscape are more successful in identifying and attracting candidates who not only meet your technical requirements but also align seamlessly with your company culture. At JacksonGrant we are also able to leverage advanced recruitment technologies, from AI-driven applicant tracking systems to data analytics tools, to enhance the efficiency and precision of your hiring process. 6.    Focus on core competenciesEntrusting talent acquisition to RaaS expert allows your HR team to redirect their energy and time towards critical areas like employee development and retention. This strategic shift not only enhances the overall effectiveness of your organisation but also enables your business to concentrate on its core competencies, whether that's innovating products, improving customer service, or expanding into new markets. In doing so, you optimise your operational efficiency and achieve a competitive edge, as your dedicated RaaS partner handles your talent acquisition with precision. The benefits of reduced costs, time savings, scalability, specialised expertise, and enhanced quality of hire paint a compelling picture for businesses seeking to stay competitive in Thailand’s competitive talent acquisition market. As the demands for top-quality talent continue to grow, partnering with a dedicated RaaS provider can be a strategic game-changer. It not only streamlines the recruitment process but also empowers you to focus on your core strategic functions. To thrive in the ever-competitive marketplace, consider JacksonGrant as your trusted talent acquisition partner. Embrace the future of recruitment and unlock your organisation's potential for growth and success. As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements

View
Building Lasting Partnerships: The Power of Exclusive Recruitment Solutions
Oct
16
Building Lasting Partnerships: The Power of Exclusive Recruitment Solutions

A competitive employment market in Thailand presents companies seeking to recruit engineering and technical talent with some formidable challenges. Demand still outstrips supply for technical, digital and English skills yet for 60% of Thai companies, their ability to attract and retain digital and technical talent will be crucial to their success. From identifying qualified candidates to navigating the complexities of cultural fit and efficient communication, the recruitment process can be a daunting undertaking. In this article, we’ll explore the advantages of exclusive recruitment solutions, highlighting how they address the unique needs of businesses in Thailand while emphasizing the value of collaboration and commitment in the quest for top-tier engineering and technical talent. What makes exclusive recruitment solutions different? Traditionally, when you experience a vacancy, you may engage multiple recruitment agencies and methods to source and present you with suitable candidates. This can be costly, and time consuming for you and require your HR department to be hands on managing agencies. And, since recruiters who work in traditional models get paid commission only when they successfully place a candidate they often have many clients, meaning their attention is spread thinly. With exclusive recruitment, you partner with a single specialised recruiter who undertakes to fulfil all your staffing needs. This means that the recruiter gains a deeper understanding of your requirements, your long-term goals, and your culture. With that understanding they can create tailored solutions that give quicker results and higher quality candidates. Particularly beneficial for businesses seeking hard to find skills in a competitive market. Unlike traditional recruitment approaches, exclusive recruitment allows you and your partner to develop a committed, collaborative, and mutually beneficial relationship. Signs your business may benefit from an exclusive recruitment partnership So how can you tell if exclusive recruitment is the right solution for your talent acquisition needs? There are lots of signs that an RPO partnership with JacksonGrant would benefit your business, including: You need to hire at volume You are looking for hard-to-find or specialist skills You have vacancies that are taking too long to fill You do not have internal recruitment experience Your teams are growing quickly You are moving into Thailand and SEA for the first time You are dissatisfied with the quality of resumes you are receiving for positions. You often feel the candidates presented have not been sufficiently qualified or briefed for the role If any of this sounds familiar, an exclusive recruitment partnership could be extremely beneficial for your business, helping you get the talent acquisition support you need. 3 Incredible benefits of exclusive recruitment partnerships with JacksonGrant  1.    Increased commitmentWhen both parties share a committed interest in the success of the recruitment process, there's a heightened sense of purpose and dedication towards finding the ideal candidates. And, when you work together in an exclusive partnership, your recruitment needs will receive the undivided, focused attention of a dedicated account manager who can provide overview and steer the team to success as well as liaise with senior client stakeholders for feedback and strategic inputs. This translates into a more thorough candidate search, a faster and more efficient hiring process, and ultimately, a higher likelihood of securing top talent that perfectly fits your organisation's requirements. 2.    Better candidate alignmentWorking exclusively with a recruiter offers a unique advantage in that it allows them to gain an in-depth understanding of your company culture and specific requirements. This deep insight into your values, work environment, and the nuance of your industry enables them to tailor the candidate search and selection process with precision. At JacksonGrant we build this alignment into a pre-defined service level agreement, meaning expectations are outlined from the outset for every recruitment process. By targeting candidates who not only possess the necessary technical skills but also align seamlessly with your company's culture, values, and long-term goals the recruiter can present candidates who are not just qualified on paper but are also a great cultural fit. his personalized approach to recruitment minimizes the risk of mismatches and increases the likelihood of long-term success and talent retention.  3.    Improved communicationA dedicated relationship provides you with access to regular updates and progress reports, keeping you informed at every step of the recruitment process. It also creates a direct channel for you to provide detailed feedback to the recruiter, allowing them to fine-tune and adjust their processes in real-time to better align with your company's evolving needs and preferences. At JacksonGrant we hold regular review meetings with all our clients. Harnessing data and analytics to give insights into the effectiveness of the partnership and highlight areas for development and optimisation. Beyond updates and feedback, exclusive partnerships offer the opportunity for recruiters to provide in-depth advice on various aspects of your talent acquisition strategy, including your employer branding, enhancing the candidate experience , and optimising your workforce management. This collaborative communication not only strengthens the recruitment process but also ensures that it's a well-informed, strategic, and mutually beneficial partnership from start to finish. Top tips for preparing for an exclusive recruitment partnership We hope that with this understanding you’re ready to begin an exclusive recruitment partnership! To prepare for a successful exclusive recruitment collaboration, you should consider a few key tips: Define your goals and expectations clearly, outlining your precise talent acquisition needs, culture, and long-term objectives. Doing so will make it easier to communicate these effectively to your recruitment partner.  Establish a transparent and open line of communication from the outset, encouraging regular updates, feedback, and discussions.  Be ready to collaborate closely with your chosen recruitment partner, providing them with all the necessary resources and information about your business that they need to excel in their search for top talent.  Maintain flexibility and trust in the partnership. Allow your dedicated recruiter to leverage their expertise while remaining open to their guidance and insights.  A pre-defined service level agreement, meaning expectations are outlined from the outset for every recruitment process. Dedicated Account manager who can provide overview and steer the team to success as well as liaise with senior client stakeholders for feedback and strategic inputs. Regular review meetings - harnessing data and analytics to give insights into the effectiveness of the partnership and highlight areas for development and optimisation. This proactive and cooperative approach sets the stage for a fruitful and mutually beneficial exclusive recruitment collaboration. If you are looking to secure engineering and technical talent crucial to your success, we encourage you to explore exclusive partnerships with JacksonGrant. Our commitment to excellence and tailored approach can be the catalyst for your organisation's growth, ensuring you not only find the right talent but also foster long-lasting, mutually beneficial relationships.  As Thailand's leading technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements

View
How Thailand's Aging Workforce is Redefining Recruitment
Oct
9
How Thailand's Aging Workforce is Redefining Recruitment

Like many countries around the globe, Thailand’s population is aging, fast. But what does that mean for your business and your hiring strategy? By 2060 the World Bank predicts that Thailand’s working-age population will have declined by around 30%, making it harder for businesses to attract and retain young talent with the skills they need for sustainable, long-term growth. Businesses need to act now, to put in place strategies that will help them combat the effects of Thailand’s aging workforce and ensure they have a strong talent pipeline to see them into the future. The Demographic Challenge It is estimated that by 2029 Thailand will join Japan, Singapore and Germany as one of the worlds “super-aged” societies. Defined by the UN as a country where over 21% of its population is over the age of 65, a “super-aged” society is the result of medical advances and access to better healthcare combined with declining birthrates.  Thailand’s labour force is still relatively young. The total working age population (those aged 15 or over) is around 58.65 million people. However, as the population overall ages out of the labour market, if businesses fail to replace them the economy will struggle. Why Is the Aging Workforce a Problem? An aging population can be beneficial for businesses. It opens up new opportunities for products and services to meet the needs of this new demographic and new markets for investment. But a decrease in the number of available workers causes problems, such as: Declining graduate rates and skill gaps Increasing competition for top-level candidates Reduced productivity and workforce efficiency Increasing labour costs Strategies for Addressing an Aging Workforce Businesses seeking to take proactive steps to bridge the potential talent gaps caused by an aging workforce should consider the following: 1.    Rethinking Recruitment StrategiesIn the face of an aging workforce, rethinking your approaches to recruitment can help navigate the challenges effectively. Investing in skill development and training programs that use the skills and institutional knowledge of your senior staff can ensure your workforce has the skills you need to fill talent gaps internally and working with educational institutions can ensure graduates possess in demand skills for your industry. Diversifying your recruitment channels is also essential. Collaborating with a specialised recruiter like Jackson Grant can help you go beyond traditional recruitment methods and expand your reach to a wider pool of candidates both locally and internationally, including seasoned professionals looking for new opportunities.  2.    Retaining and Using Older WorkersRecognising and valuing the wealth of experience held by older employees is important. Businesses need to shift attitudes and norms around retirement to allow older employees to continue to contribute their valuable knowledge and experience. Flexible work arrangements and phased retirement programmes alongside knowledge transfer and mentorship schemes can keep older workers productive for longer and creates a platform for them to exchange skills and insights with younger workers. This can be beneficial in both directions as younger staff can encourage digital skills in the older generation reaffirming their importance in the organisation.  This intergenerational collaboration not only enhances productivity but also nurtures a culture of mutual respect, reducing age-related biases and stereotypes. 3.    Embracing Technology and AutomationIt’s clear that automation and technology will continue to reduce the need for large workforces by increasing productivity, efficiency and automating repetitive tasks allowing businesses to focus their human resources on more strategic and creative areas. However, technology and automation offer other solutions for dealing with an aging workforce. Technology can facilitate upskilling initiatives through online learning platforms, virtual training modules, and interactive tutorials to enable the existing workforce, including older employees, to adapt to technological advancements at their own pace. And, integrating technology and AI-driven tools can revolutionise the recruitment process, not only saving time but also ensuring more precise matches between job requirements and applicant skills. Significantly improving your ability to find and hire the right talent quickly, essential in a competitive job market. 4.     Engaging with New Talent PoolsOne of the most effective and immediate solutions for businesses struggling with an aging workforce is to explore new pools of talent to diversify their talent base. There are a variety of avenues to explore, including collaborating with local communities and engaging grassroots organisations and educational institutions to discover hidden talent pools overlooked in traditional recruitment processes. Businesses should also be participating in government initiatives aimed at upskilling workers and advocating for national and international policies that support a diverse and skilled workforce.  Increased female participation in the workforce is another vital step to reducing the negative effects of an aging workforce. Just 46% of Thailand’s workforce is female and only 15% of those are in a leadership position. Businesses should also be making themselves attractive to international applicants by offering competitive benefits. The coming demographic shift, marked by a shrinking pool of skilled workers, demands strategic foresight and proactive measures. By recognising the urgency of the situation and adopting innovative strategies, such as investing in skill development, embracing technology, and tapping into diverse talent pools, your business can navigate the impending talent gap caused by Thailand’s aging workforce.   Embracing initiatives to address an aging workforce shouldn’t merely be a response to a challenge; it's an investment in the future resilience and sustainability of your businesses. The time to act is now, paving the way for a workforce that is skilled, diverse, and well-prepared for the challenges and opportunities of the future. Looking For Recruitment Support In Thailand? As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your business. Whether you are a local organisation or are looking to expand your operations into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
Establishing a Thriving Manufacturing Hub in Thailand: Strategies for Success
Oct
2
Establishing a Thriving Manufacturing Hub in Thailand: Strategies for Success

The allure of Thailand and Southeast Asia (SEA) for manufacturing businesses right now is undeniable. Nestled in the heart of a dynamic and rapidly growing global economy, the region has emerged as a hub for international companies seeking to expand their operations. Boasting a strategic location, abundant natural resources, and a burgeoning consumer market, Thailand and SEA offers a wealth of opportunities to manufacturers across a wide variety of industries. Not least because of attractive government incentives designed to entice manufacturers to the region. From electric vehicles to vaccines, baked goods to computer chips, Thailand is an attractive location for manufacturing and production. However, there are challenges that multinational companies in Thailand must navigate if they want to be successful. From local regulations and diverse cultural nuances to talent acquisition hurdles and supply chain intricacies, these challenges can appear daunting. 3 Challenges for businesses setting up operations in Thailand First, let’s look at three of the most common challenges facing businesses looking to establish manufacturing operations in the region: Cultural and regulatory differences Understanding local regulations can be time-consuming and frustrating for international businesses setting up in Thailand. Effective communication and local expertise are essential. There are also cultural differences when it comes to doing business which need to be accounted for. Recognising and valuing cultural differences not only strengthens relationships with clients, partners, and stakeholders it makes employee engagement and retention more successful. Crucial if you are looking for hard to find skills and experience. Talent acquisition and retention Speaking of recruitment and talent retention, the current talent landscape in Thailand and SEA is extremely competitive, particularly for candidates with technical qualifications, digital skills, and English language abilities. It’s important for international businesses moving into the market to really think about their strategies for attracting and retaining local talent. Supply chain complexities An efficient supply chain is the lifeblood of any successful business, particularly when setting up operations in Thailand. Managing logistics and distribution challenges is crucial, as it directly impacts cost-effectiveness, customer satisfaction, and overall competitiveness. A local supply chain offers reduced lead times, better control over quality, and easier access to local resources. Thailand also has access to a global supply chain that can help you leverage cost savings from economies of scale and diversify risk across multiple markets. The choice between the two depends on, market demands, and the long-term strategic goals of your business. Practical strategies for building a manufacturing business in Thailand With a wealth of industry expertise, JacksonGrant is uniquely positioned to guide your business through setting up a business in Thailand and SEA. With JacksonGrant's help you can transform these challenges into opportunities for success through practical strategies that support: Branding and localisation Building a strong local brand presence goes beyond marketing; it also profoundly influences your recruitment strategy. When a business is well-regarded and recognised within the local community, it signals trust and stability, making it more appealing to potential employees. A strong local brand presence can help in attracting talent that identifies with your company's values and mission. This alignment of brand and culture fosters better employee engagement and retention, and long-term success in the region. Collaboration with local partners Jackson Grant’s deep understanding of local markets and trends provides our partners with a competitive edge. This insight helps you tailor your talent attraction strategies to align with local preferences and identify emerging trends that can inform business decisions. Our established regional networks may even open doors to other strategic partnerships that can support your continued growth and success in the Thai market. Understanding local government and regulations A comprehensive understanding of employment laws and regulations in Thailand ensures your business remains compliant. With our insight into local labour practices and law you can enable make informed decisions concerning hiring, contracts, and employee management, ensuring smooth operations and long-term sustainability. Talent Management Our deep knowledge of the local talent market ensures that you are not only able to find the right candidates but also nurture their growth and potential. Through long-term, forward-thinking talent management strategies, we help you establish training programs, career development paths, and performance evaluation systems that foster employee engagement and retention. This commitment to talent development translates into a workforce that is not only skilled now but drives business success no matter what the future holds. JacksonGrant: Your strategic partner in Thailand Setting up manufacturing operations in Thailand and Southeast Asia presents businesses with an array of challenges. However, with JacksonGrant as your trusted partner, these challenges become opportunities for growth and success. By tapping into our industry expertise, local insights, and tailored solutions, your business can thrive in this dynamic region with confidence! As Thailand's leading technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements

View
Dawn of a New Day - What Economic Policies Can We Expect from Thailand’s New Government?
Sep
25
Dawn of a New Day - What Economic Policies Can We Expect from Thailand’s New Government?

Thailand’s new government took office this month. Prime Minister Srettha Thavisin, a real-estate tycoon, says revitalising the economy is his top priority. He faces a big challenge. The new administration’s economic stimulus strategies will have an immediate impact on the Thai economy – and recruitment.   Open the Floodgates: The Logjam Is Cleared It took more than three months of contentious post-election negotiations to form the ruling coalition. During that period of uncertainty, a lot of investment and hiring decisions were paused. Now that the PM and Cabinet ministers have been sworn in, the private sector can implement plans for the near- and mid-term future with greater clarity. Almost immediately after the new government was announced, we’ve seen a significant increase in requests for new hires from our multinational clients. Spearheading the push to attract more international investment, PM Srettha courted executives from Microsoft, Google, Goldman Sachs, Tesla, and Estee Lauder during his trip to the USA last week. Economic Headwinds Once celebrated as the economic ‘Tiger of Southeast Asia,’ Thailand’s GDP growth rate is now lagging behind its ASEAN neighbours. GDP grew by 2.6% last year, according to the World Bank. By comparison, Malaysia’s 2002 GDP growth rate was 8.7%; Vietnam’s was 8%; the Philippines 7.6%).  PM Srettha is under pressure to increase GDP growth and boost exports, a mainstay of the Thai economy. The new government is expected to introduce improved incentives for EV manufacturing and other high-tech industries. Exports to China in Focus Export volumes to China have been dented, as Beijing tweaks their supply chain for greater self-sufficiency. China’s new strategic direction is impacting Thailand’s exports. To cite just one example of these impacts: Thai shrimp producers are feeling the pain worse than most. China’s leadership has built up a two-year stockpile of shrimp – a protein source that is popular and easy to freeze, dry, and store. As a result, demand is softening, and the price of shrimp has dropped precipitously during the past two years. Thailand’s economic advisors are keenly aware of this issue – in one of his first moves as PM, Srettha travelled to Samut Sakhon to meet with shrimp producers. Key Policy Initiatives – EV Manufacturing, Full Steam Ahead! Thailand was one of the first ASEAN countries to offer subsidies and incentives for EV manufacturers and suppliers, putting the kingdom at the forefront of electric vehicle production in the region. Thailand has consolidated its position as ASEAN’s EV industrial hub, attracting leading Chinese car manufacturers like SAIC, Great Wall, BYD, Hozon, Changan, and GAC Aion to establish operations here. Chinese EV manufacturers were among the first to take advantage of the government’s generous subsidies, and enjoy a competitive advantage. Last week while travelling in the USA, Srettha spoke with Tesla brass, including boss Elon Musk, via videocall to sell the global automaker on Thailand’s incentives package for manufacturing infrastructure. According to a Thai government statement, Tesla reportedly sees “Thai human capital” as “suitable for investment.” As part of the government’s aggressive push to make Thailand the preeminent hub for EV manufacturing, the previous administration set a goal for EVs to constitute 50% of domestically produced vehicles by 2030. Nearly 10% of new vehicles sold in Thailand during the first half of 2023 were EVs. Thailand Automotive Institute expects EV sales to reach 50,000 units this year from 20,000 in the previous year. Current subsidies amount to around 70,000-150,000 baht per vehicle. When PM Srettha’s administration rolls out their new EV manufacturing incentives package, it will likely pave the way for EV suppliers and manufacturers to further ramp up their presence in Thailand. Some Chinese manufacturers are already moving full steam ahead with existing plans to ramp up EV-manufacturing operations in Thailand. BYD is investing nearly $500 million in Thailand to build a new factory that will produce 150,000 EVs for export starting in 2024. Thai EV buyers comprised 24% of BYD's overseas sales in the second quarter, making it the company’s largest foreign market.  In March, Hozon announced it would set up an ecological smart factory in Thailand. The factory will begin production in 2024 with a capacity of 100,000 cars per year in the first phase, doubling to 200,000 in the second phase. Waiting for the Next Round of EV Incentive Package Announcements Other companies are holding off on further investment, waiting with bated breath to see what subsidies the Thavisin government will offer to maintain Thailand’s regional EV manufacturing dominance. Industry Minister Pimphattra Wichaikul told the Bangkok Post she expects a National EV Policy Committee will be formed with the aim of introducing a new package of incentives before the end of the year. One proposal offers a subsidy of 24 billion baht to encourage local battery production, while imposing a tariff on imported cells. Ms Wichaikul has indicated that interdepartmental talks with the Ministry of Energy may bear fruit in this regard. If the Energy Ministry and other agencies can agree on concessions for charging stations, for example, EV growth could really take off. Limited infrastructure is the main reason why there aren’t enough EVs on the road in Thailand, and the main challenge to the government meeting its EV sales and production targets. The Need for Greater SME Stimulus Ms Wichaikul has also, quite rightly in my opinion, expressed the need for greater support of Thailand’s small- and medium-sized businesses. Inflation has driven up operating costs, credit is harder to obtain, and many smaller enterprises are still struggling to recover from the effects of the covid pandemic.   Small businesses are a critical engine of Thailand’s economy. Increasing access to funding for SMEs and making it easier for ordinary people to start new businesses will help generate GDP growth more than cash handouts. We should not focus exclusively on attracting investment from big multinationals; Thailand needs to cultivate entrepreneurship and innovation, which are the foundation for a healthy business environment. Potential Impacts on Business Leadership and Executive Recruitment With the changing of the guard in Bangkok finally taking effect after a long delay, the new administration understandably feels a sense of urgency to jump start the Thai economy, especially the EV manufacturing sector. In September and October many MNCs will be planning their budgets and operational strategies for 2024. The shifting political landscape may well become a factor in deciding on who will occupy top levels of leadership moving forward. When the covid pandemic put the brakes on the global economy, corporate leadership was necessarily preoccupied with survival and financial sustainability. But now that we’ve emerged from the covid-induced slowdown, organisational strategy likely will focus more on growth, increasing competitiveness, and gaining market share, rather than simply keeping the business afloat. This shift in focus and global dynamics may well necessitate changes in corporate leadership, a pivot to personnel who are better equipped to facilitate accelerated growth at the global and regional level. If we are prioritising growth, rather than navigating a crisis, a different set of attributes are preferred: MNCs will be looking for leadership who are quick decision-makers, who can enable decentralisation and delegate authority to make companies more agile and competitive. Given the transformative nature of the manufacturing industry, with the constant introduction of new technology, and new products, I see a greater need for dynamic, more assertive leadership: Executives who are more comfortable operating in an ambiguous environment. Thailand is a different, and in many ways more difficult place to conduct business than Europe: critical decisions sometimes must be made with limited information and less long-term clarity, and not every leader is capable of that. Sectors in Focus The majority of advanced tech and manufacturing jobs are concentrated in the industrial Eastern Seaboard of Thailand. A significant amount are located in Ayutthaya and Pathum Thani as well, provinces north of Bangkok that constitute ‘the electronics heartlands’ of the kingdom. Before the pandemic struck, the Office of National Higher Education Science Research and Innovation Policy Council projected a need to recruit around 60,000 professionals for aviation and logistics, automotive, robotics, AI, defence and security roles between 2020 and 2024. These targets have not been met, in part due to disruptions from the pandemic, but also because of an ongoing shortfall in domestic talent supply that has not been fully addressed. This lends perhaps more impetus to changes in leadership. As organisations survey the rapidly evolving marketplace, they need to ask: How will we adapt? Do we need to change course? Can the skill sets we need for a more bold approach be trained? Do we promote from within, or is it necessary to import fresh talent? If your organisation is searching for the right solutions to these challenges, JacksonGrant is here to help. Reach out to us today. Click

View
Crafting an Irresistible EVP: Attracting Top Talent in Manufacturing & Logistics
Sep
18
Crafting an Irresistible EVP: Attracting Top Talent in Manufacturing & Logistics

Thailand's manufacturing and logistics industries are promising areas for investment, despite a slowing economy. Global firms manufacturing products from cars to electronics, and even biotechnology, have Thailand on their radar as they seek to diversify their supply networks, thanks to its infrastructure, location and relatively low costs. This increasing competition for talent has meant that businesses need to find new ways to set themselves apart to secure the best candidates. This is where a well-crafted Employee Value Proposition (EVP) can come in. By creating an EVP that appeals to manufacturing and logistics candidates you can make your business more attractive to top talent, helping you secure the skills you need for growth. What is an EVP and why is it important Your Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is the unique set of attributes, benefits, and values you’re your organisation offers to its employees in exchange for their skills, contributions, and commitment. It covers everything from compensation and benefits to career development opportunities, company culture, and work-life balance. In competitive industries like manufacturing and logistics, a tailored EVP distinguishes your company from others, making it more appealing to potential candidates but a well thought out EVP has many other benefits, including: •    Attracting hard to find skillsBy meeting the specific motivations and aspirations employees in manufacturing and logistics you can attract individuals with the skills and expertise you need.  •    Improved retention and engagement When employees feel that their values align with the company's, they are more likely to stay committed and engaged. •    Cost savingsA strong EVP can reduce recruitment costs as you'll be able to retain employees for longer periods, reducing the need for constant hiring and training. •    Enhanced company cultureAn EVP is part of your workplace culture. Crafting an EVP that aligns with the values and aspirations of your workforce, leads to a more harmonious and productive work environment. •    Improved performanceEmployees who resonate with the company's EVP are likely to be more motivated and productive, contributing positively to the company's overall performance. Creating a compelling EVP that resonates When thinking about creating your EVP you should consider the following: 1.    Understanding your company and your competitorsUnderstanding your own company and competitors is the first step in crafting an effective EVP. Identifying your unique selling points (USPs) helps you pinpoint what makes your company stand out. By recognising these strengths, you can use them in your EVP to attract top talent. Conducting a competitive analysis of competitors' EVPs allows you to identify gaps where your company can offer something unique that competitors don't, and it helps you seize opportunities to enhance your EVP.  2.    Understanding candidate motivationsTo achieve an EVP that resonates with manufacturing and logistic professionals you should start by profiling candidates to discern their career aspirations and goals. This insight enables you to build an EVP that aligns with what potential employees are seeking, whether it's career advancement, skill development, or a specific work environment.  Alongside candidate goals you should consider external factors shaping candidate choices. Factors like economic conditions, in-demand skills, and interest from multinational corporations can significantly influence job seekers. By including responses to both you can create an EVP that not only addresses individual desires but that reflects the broader industry landscape, making it more appealing and relevant to potential hires. 3.    What makes a “good” EVPClear and authentic messaging is crucial for a compelling EVP. It fosters trust through honesty and transparency showing candidates what they can truly expect when working with you. Making sure your company culture matches your EVP ensures that it's not just words on paper, but a genuine reflection of your workplace, enhancing its appeal and impact. Benefits to consider include:  o    Competitive salary and benefits packageso    Unique perks relevant to the industryo    Opportunities for growth and advancemento    Training and skill development programso    Flexible scheduling and remote work optionso    Employee wellness initiatives Choose those that best match your culture and candidate needs.  4.    Communicating your EVPThere are many ways to communicate your EVP to candidates. Digital channels like your website and social media allow you to reach a broad audience, particularly tech-savvy candidates. Engaging with candidates on professional networks such as LinkedIn provides a platform for more targeted interactions within specific industries. And, by encouraging current employees to share their experiences on various platforms you can convey authenticity and relatability to potential hires.  Involving employees in the EVP promotion process gives them a sense of ownership and enthusiasm, reinforcing the message organically within the company and making it more compelling for external audiences. This approach can help improve your recruitment and your retention.  o    Measuring the Impact of Your EVPMeasuring the impact of your EVP is an important step. There are several metrics you can track such as: o    Application rates and candidate quality - these metrics assess how effectively your EVP is attracting potential hires and whether they align with your desired standards o    Employee retention rates - tracking this allows you to evaluate whether your EVP not only attracts but also retains talent o    Feedback from candidates - offers valuable insights into how well your EVP resonates with them and where improvements are needed.  By making enhancements based on this information, you can fine-tune your EVP, ensuring it continues to meet the evolving needs of both your organization and prospective employees, ultimately improving your recruitment efforts. Developing your Employee Value Proposition (EVP) for not only makes it easier to attract top manufacturing and logistics talent, but enhances retention, reducing recruitment costs. This tailored approach fosters a culture that resonates with employees, positively impacting performance, and overall business success. Ultimately, it positions your business as an employer of choice in these competitive markets.   As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements

View
Navigating Talent Acquisition Challenges in the Manufacturing and Supply Chain Industry
Sep
11
Navigating Talent Acquisition Challenges in the Manufacturing and Supply Chain Industry

Thailand and the Asia-Pacific Region occupy an increasingly strategic position in the global manufacturing and supply chain industries. With big names such as Apple and HP looking to diversify their supply chains and shift production to Thailand, and other industries like EV automotive manufacturing making big investments in the region the country is poised to take centre stage. But Thailand’s emerging importance in the manufacturing and global supply chain industries and growth potential is not without its challenges. Particularly in the face of a looming economic slowdown.  3 talent acquisition challenges in the manufacturing and supply chain industries At Jackson Grant, our experts are keeping a keen eye on the evolving landscape of talent acquisition in the manufacturing and supply chain industries across Thailand and the broader Asia-Pacific region. Companies face an array of unique challenges, the most pressing being: 1.    The need for specialised skillsCutting-edge technologies such as additive manufacturing, machine learning and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) are changing the face of manufacturing and supply chain industries. These innovations require a workforce equipped with specialised skills, ranging from 3D printing expertise to data analytics and AI-driven supply chain optimisation. Other skills are also in high demand. As multinational companies establish themselves in Thailand and the broader Asia-Pacific region, the demand for candidates with strong English skills has soared.  However, sourcing and attracting candidates with these highly sought-after skills poses a challenge. Both the manufacturing and supply chain industries are experiencing a skills gap. Where demand for candidates with the right skill sets far outstrips supply. Governments and businesses need to find innovative solutions to this problem including upskilling, global talent sourcing and developing a sustainable talent pipeline. 2.    The Battle for Top TalentThe scarcity of key skills has led to intense competition between businesses for top talent in the industry. In this highly competitive landscape, attracting and retaining skilled professionals has become a formidable challenge. Companies that struggle to secure the best talent face a range of consequences. First and foremost, they may experience a lack of innovation and poor growth. Secondly as competitors offer higher salaries to tempt employees away, the costs of employee turnover can be staggering. Both in terms of recruitment expenses and the loss of institutional knowledge. Finally, a workforce that lacks the necessary skills can lead to inefficiencies, errors, and missed opportunities, affecting the bottom line, and jeopardising long-term success.  3.    Navigating Market TrendsRecent market trends have the power to affect talent acquisition in the manufacturing and supply chain industry significantly. As we’ve seen the adoption of new technologies has accelerated the demand for talent with expertise in these areas. Sustainability concerns have also shifted the landscape, with businesses looking for candidates with knowledge of supply chain transparency, and green logistics.  Most importantly recent global trade dynamics, particularly the ongoing economic slowdown and threat of recession have caused businesses to be more strategic about workforce planning and retention and to look for ways to make their recruitment more cost-effective and efficient. It has also caused candidates to be more careful in their decisions to move roles adding to the ongoing talent shortage.  How our expertise can help your business overcome today’s talent acquisition challenges At Jackson Grant our leadership team has decades of experience of the labour market in Thailand as well extensive industry specific knowledge that makes us the leading recruiter for the manufacturing and technological industries in the region.  We help businesses across the manufacturing and supply chain sectors, like yours, overcome talent acquisition challenges through: 1.    A deep understanding of the local and regional job marketsThis insight empowers your business to compete more effectively for talent by identifying and capitalising on unique regional strengths and weaknesses. With this knowledge we help you adapt your recruitment strategies in real-time, staying agile and responsive to market changes, local trends, salary expectations, and emerging skill requirements. Allowing you to source, attract and retain the key talent you need to drive innovation and growth.  2.    Tailored recruitment solutions Aligning talent acquisition with your business goals is paramount for sustainable success. By closely collaborating with your businesses, we ensure that every hire contributes directly to your growth and strategic vision. Our approach tailor’s recruitment strategies to meet your unique objectives. It integrates all aspects of the recruitment process, from sourcing to onboarding, optimising hiring lead-times, and enhancing efficiency. This not only accelerates time-to-fill but also significantly reduces costs associated with prolonged vacancies and high turnover rates.  3.    Building partnerships for long-term successBuilding an enduring relationship with your RPO (Recruitment Process Outsourcing) partners is important in overcoming talent acquisition challenges. Long-term partnerships help us develop a profound understanding of your company's culture, values, and evolving talent needs. This enables us to provide more targeted and effective recruitment solutions, reducing time-to-hire and enhancing candidate quality. The ongoing relationship helps with proactive workforce planning, allowing you to stay ahead of industry shifts and market trends.  As Thailand's leading manufacturing and supply chain recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
JacksonGrant Embarks On New Talent Acquisition Partnership With East-West Seed
Sep
11
JacksonGrant Embarks On New Talent Acquisition Partnership With East-West Seed

Thailand's leading technical recruitment agency announces new Recruitment as a Service project with Southeast Asia's No.1 tropical vegetable seed company. JacksonGrant is truly delighted to announce a new project partnership with East West Seed International , one of the most trusted tropical vegetable seed companies in the world with international headquarters based in Thailand. Since 1982 East-West Seed has been on a mission to provide seeds and services that improve the lives of farmers and promote sustainable farming and business practices globally. Founded by Simon N. Groot the winner of the 2019 World Food Prize, known as the ‘Nobel Prize for Food’, the work of East-West Seed has invigorated the tropical seed industry in Southeast Asia and beyond. Through its support of smallholder farmers and the development of both rural and urban markets for vegetable crops, East-West Seed made nutritious vegetables more affordable and transformed the lives of 20 million farmers every year. Our innovative Recruitment as a Service model (RaaS) takes the best elements of RPO and combines it with the essentials from other recruitment models, such as Project Recruitment and Executive Search. Giving our partners, like East-West Seed, access to a fully integrated, sustainable, and holistic talent acquisition solution which can be customised to suit the unique needs of any business. JacksonGrant’s RaaS model offers exceptional benefits for businesses looking to attract high-quality talent quickly and effectively including: Lower hiring costs Tap into our RaaS knowledge and expertise to reduce the time and resources you spend sourcing, screening, and assessing candidates. And because we recommend the most effective recruitment channels for your needs you can significantly reduce your advertising and sourcing costs. Better quality of hires A customised recruitment strategy designed around a deeper insight into your company requirements, values, and culture ensures that only candidates who are the best fit, not just an experience match are presented for consideration. Optimised recruitment processes Throughout your RaaS partnership, our expert consultants are continuously working to refine and improve your recruitment efforts and achieve better hiring outcomes for your business. The market doesn’t stand still, and neither do we. Access to reporting and analytics tools Better reporting and analytics tools ensure you always have access to key information, such as time-to-fill, cost-per-hire, and quality-of-hire. Meaning the decisions you take about your talent acquisition and recruitment will be driven by data, not intuition. Ability to scale to your needs RaaS is endlessly flexible. We scale and adapt easily to meet your recruitment needs, respond to changes in demand or improve your access to specialised expertise meaning you are only ever paying for the support you really need. Unlike other RPO recruitment agencies, JacksonGrant's unique RaaS model helps you integrate all aspects of your recruitment process. Resulting in high rates of candidate engagement, optimised lead times and long-lasting placements. But more importantly, reducing the time lost to repetitive administrative processes. Giving your HR teams back their valuable time to focus on strategic value-add activities, while keeping your recruitment costs low. About JacksonGrant JacksonGrant is Thailand’s leading recruitment specialist with extensive experience in supporting companies and candidates in Thailand's booming manufacturing and supply chain sectors. Whether you are a local business looking to engage skilled candidates or an international business expanding into the Thai market, we can find high-quality candidates who are knowledgeable in international and local engineering, supply chain, manufacturing, infrastructure, life sciences and the digital & technology industries. For more information or to arrange an interview with a spokesperson from JacksonGrant, please contact us via : support@jacksongrant.io  

View
How can you increase your talent retention?
Sep
4
How can you increase your talent retention?

Thai companies have been grappling with significant challenges in retaining their top talent. Amidst the rapid advancements in new technologies and the transition towards Industry 4.0, employers are facing a mounting struggle to keep skilled professionals engaged and committed to their organisations. Talent shortages across various industries further compounds the issue, as skilled professionals are in high demand and new opportunities to grow and develop that offer better benefits could tempt them to move roles. In fact, one study predicts up to 90% of Thai workers could be looking to change roles in the next 6 months. As the business landscape evolves, knowing how to implement innovative retention strategies and make new technologies work for you in this space is essential for business leaders seeking to secure your workforce's loyalty and maintain a competitive edge. Why talent retention is so important Talent retention is not only a fundamental part of creating positive work culture that keeps employees satisfied but also a critical driver of organisational success and long-term growth. By prioritising the retention of top-performing employees, you take actions that create a stable and engaged workforce, who are more productive, innovative, and efficient. Strong talent retention also plays an important role in building a sustainable talent pipeline, positively influencing your wider recruitment efforts.  •    Reduce recruitment costs•    Maintain knowledge base•    Increase productivity•    Improve team cohesion•    Create more engaged, happier workforce•    Improve your overall employer brand 7 talent retention strategies that get results To improve retention rates and foster employee loyalty in your workplace, you can implement the following strategies into your wider people management processes: 1.    Offer Competitive Compensation and BenefitsEnsure that your employees are paid competitively and receive attractive benefits packages. Salary isn't the only factor, but it's a significant one. Conduct regular market research to stay updated on industry salary standards and adjust your compensation packages accordingly. Providing perks like health insurance, retirement plans, paid time off, and professional development opportunities can set you apart but one way to enhance their impact is to ensure that you are providing benefits that your workforce really wants. Make sure you ask your current and potential employees what perks they consider to be most attractive. 2.    Create a Positive Work EnvironmentBuilding a positive environment is a process. But when done well it keeps employees satisfied and loyal. You can take steps to build a supportive and positive culture by encouraging open communication, collaboration, recognising employee efforts, and promoting work-life balance. Clearly communicate the company's mission, vision, and values, and ensure that they are reflected in everyday practices and decision-making. When employee’s see leadership taking steps to build a better culture, they feel able to do so as well, and feel more valued as a result.  3.    Career Growth and DevelopmentEmployees are more likely to stay with a company if they see a clear path for career growth and development. Provide training programs, mentorship opportunities, and support for professional certifications. Regularly discuss career goals with your employees and offer them a chance to take on new challenges and responsibilities within the organisation. 4.    Promote Work-Life BalanceBurnout is a leading cause of employee turnover. A recent survey by Mahidol University found that 57% of workers in Thailand are at risk of burnout. Stressed workers are likely to look for roles that offer better balance or start ‘quiet quitting,’ which can negatively affect productivity. Encourage a healthy work-life balance by setting reasonable work hours, offering flexible schedules, and providing resources for stress management and wellness programs. Show genuine concern for employees' well-being and mental health. 5.    Recognise and Reward PerformanceAcknowledge and reward exceptional performance. Recognition can be in the form of verbal praise, awards, bonuses, or even promotions. When employees feel valued and appreciated for their hard work, they are more likely to stay committed to the organisation. 6.    Regular Feedback and Employee SurveysCreate opportunities for open feedback and two-way communication between management and employees. Conduct regular employee surveys to understand their concerns, needs, and suggestions. Use the feedback to make improvements and show your employees that their opinions are valued. 7.    Using new technologiesTechnology can support talent retention in several ways. Data-driven insights produced through workforce and recruitment analytics  can identify patterns and risks so you can address retention challenges proactively. E-learning platforms and digital tools can support learning and career development and employee engagement platforms can help make feedback and recognition straightforward. You can even use technology like wellness apps to promote employee well-being and work-life balance, reducing burnout. Technology-driven strategies create a more engaging work environment, leading to better talent retention outcomes. How an RPO partner can help improve your talent retention Recruitment is just one aspect of attracting and retaining skilled professionals and building a talent pool that will support your organisation’s long-term growth and success. An RPO partner like JacksonGrant can offer comprehensive solutions to help you address the challenges of talent retention.  Using our expertise in recruitment process outsourcing, we streamline the hiring process, identify new talent pools, and assist you in implementing tailored retention strategies and data-driven insights, designed for your business. By partnering with JacksonGrant, your company can strengthen its employer brand, enhance employee engagement, and position itself as an employer of choice, fostering a sustainable talent pipeline for future success. As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
How can you use workforce analytics to improve your recruiting?
Aug
28
How can you use workforce analytics to improve your recruiting?

Effective recruitment lies at the heart of driving business success, as the ability to attract and retain top talent directly impacts an organization's growth and competitiveness. In the dynamic landscape of the Asia-Pacific region, where businesses operate in diverse markets and compete for a limited pool of skilled professionals, the role of workforce analytics in transforming recruitment processes has never been more critical.  By leveraging specific metrics, such as time-to-fill, cost-per-hire, and quality of hire, HR professionals and business leaders can gain valuable insights to improve attraction strategies, enhance retention efforts, optimise cost management, and ultimately achieve better recruiting outcomes. Explore the transformative power of workforce analytics and learn how data-driven approaches can unlock the full potential of your recruitment below. Understanding workforce analytics and recruitment metrics Recruitment metrics are specific data points that measure the effectiveness and efficiency of the hiring process. These metrics can be used in many ways to improve your recruitment processes and help you make better hiring decisions. Key recruitment metrics that can be analysed include: •    Time-to-FillMeasures the overall efficiency of the hiring process helping you to minimise potential revenue loss due to prolonged vacancies. •    Cost-Per-HireProvides insight into the cost of acquiring new talent giving you greater control over your recruitment budget. •    Quality of HireAssesses the overall impact and performance of newly hired employees, showing how good your hiring process is at securing candidates with the right skills who also align with your culture, values, and goals. •    Applicant Sources and Channel EffectivenessProvides crucial data on the origin of candidates and the performance of different sourcing channels.  •    Candidate ExperienceGauges the overall satisfaction and impression candidates have of the hiring process, directly influencing employer branding and reputation. 5 ways workforce analytics can improve your recruitment Workforce analytics works by taking those metrics and using the data provided to give you insights into how well your recruitment process works. Those insights can then be used to help you improve and streamline your hiring by: 1.    Identifying effective sourcing channelsBy analysing historical data, you can determine which platforms or channels have yielded the highest-quality candidates and optimal conversion rates in the past. This data-driven approach enables you to allocate your resources more efficiently and invest in channels that produce the best results.  Workforce analytics can also help make your sourcing more effective. Allowing you to create targeted job advertisements tailored to specific candidate preferences and characteristics, resulting in improved attraction and engagement.  2.    Measuring candidate engagement Through data-driven tools and metrics, you can easily track candidates' interactions with your recruitment process, including website visits, application progress, and response times. These insights enable you to identify bottlenecks and points of friction, streamlining the candidate journey for a more seamless experience.  Analytics can even help gauge candidates' sentiment and feedback, providing valuable information to enhance communication and responsiveness. By using workforce analytics in this way, you can foster stronger candidate engagement and build a positive employer brand that appeals to top talent. 3.    Lowering recruitment costsIn today’s climate getting the most from your resources is paramount. You can use workforce analysis to focus your efforts on channels that yield the best results, reducing unnecessary expenses. Reducing time-to-fill is another key aspect of reducing costs, as prolonged vacancies increase cost-per-hire.  Analytics help pinpoint bottlenecks and streamline the hiring process, reducing time-to-fill and associated expenses. Finally, using data insights to optimise your recruitment budget allows for smarter allocation of funds. Maximizing the impact of every recruiting dollar spent. Leveraging workforce analytics in these ways helps you achieve significant cost savings while maintaining the quality of your hiring efforts. 4.    Improving retentionYou can use workforce analytics to go beyond simply identifying the factors that influence.  turnover such as low engagement, inadequate career growth opportunities, or issues with management. Analysis of those metrics allow you to take targeted actions to address these specific pain points proactively. But they also allow you to forecast potential retention risks among employees. Armed with this information you can take preventative measures, such as implementing targeted retention initiatives, offering competitive compensation packages, and creating a positive work environment to reduce the likelihood of losing valuable talent. Used properly workforce analytics can also be used to implement personalised employee development plans. By analysing individual performance data, skill sets, and career aspirations, you can create tailored growth opportunities for your employees. This data-driven approach not only fosters job satisfaction but also aligns employees' personal and professional goals with the organization's objectives. Making employees feel valued and encouraging talent to stick with you, long-term. 5.    Driving better recruitment outcomesAnalytics can significantly enhance recruitment outcomes and result in better hires. To achieve this, businesses must align recruitment metrics with their organisational goals, ensuring that the hiring process focuses on specific skills and qualities that drive success within the company.  Data can also play a critical role in making informed decisions during recruitment. By analysing candidate information, performance data, and historical hiring trends, you can identify the most suitable candidates and assess their potential for long-term success.  Overcoming challenges to adopting workforce analytics Successfully implementing a data-driven approach to recruitment can be challenging, especially if you haven’t invested in workforce analytics before. Some common barriers to implementing workforce analytics in recruitment include: •    Data AccessibilityDifficulty in accessing and aggregating relevant workforce data from disparate sources can hinder the analysis process. •    Lack of Skills and ExpertiseHR professionals may lack the necessary data analysis skills to effectively interpret and use the data. •    Resistance to ChangeExisting recruitment practices and traditional mindsets may resist adopting data-driven approaches. However, a recruitment partner like JacksonGrant can help you navigate these challenges by providing expertise in data analytics, HR technology, and tailored strategies to optimise your recruitment processes such as: •    Providing training and upskilling opportunities to HR teams in data analysis and interpretation. •    Gaining support from top management to encourage a data-driven culture and investment in analytics. •    Investing in advanced HR technology and analytics tools to streamline data processing and analysis. 70% of businesses are already investing in workforce analytics for HR and recruitment. With our assistance, you too can harness power of workforce analytics to make better hiring decisions and achieve recruitment success. As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
Toxic Positivity in the Workplace
Aug
7
Toxic Positivity in the Workplace

Toxic negativity is something we absolutely must avoid. But an overly positive attitude, if taken too far, poses its own risks and dangers to business – and recruiting. The power of positive thinkingWe’re all aware of the dangers of “toxic negativity:” successful people from all walks of life, and countless social media memes drive home the importance of maintaining a positive attitude in everything we do. We are bombarded every day with messages about the power of positive thinking. But like any powerful thing, positive thinking poses its own set of risks and dangers – if we take it too far. Toxic negativity, a familiar foe Some people constantly express negative ideas and emotions. They cannot see the good in anything. Extremely negative people don’t offer compliments; they don’t see the upside, only the downside; they always see the glass as half-empty, never half-full. No matter the topic of conversation, an overly negative person will feel compelled to share unflattering opinions or strong criticism. We call this behaviour toxic negativity. I think everyone knows a colleague, relative, or friend like this. Their negativity is overwhelming, and difficult to be around. It can be a real drag on relationships and careers. HR managers and team leaders avoid hiring people with a negative attitude because it can spread and affect an organisation’s morale, and inhibit team-building efforts. What is toxic positivity? There are more rewards and benefits to being positive than being negative. We are encouraged to be positive, no matter what difficulties or troubles we are facing. I think a positive attitude can be taken too far, especially if we start to see the world entirely through rose-coloured glasses. Blind optimism can pose dangers to an organisation if the seriousness of problems are continually downplayed, if company leadership is always focused on promoting good news and feels the need to suppress bad news. We all feel pressure to constantly display positive emotions and an upbeat attitude in the office. But nothing in this world is entirely positive – or entirely negative. Like anything else, when taken to extremes, a positive attitude can become toxic. Toxic positivity is an unhealthy coping mechanism that can risk an organisation’s continued success almost as much as toxic negativity. If we shy away from unpleasant truths, focus only on the positive and ignore the negative side of things, we may overlook the root causes of a problem. By maintaining an artificially positive attitude, we may lose the objectivity required to make the best decisions for our business. We must face existential problems head-on, even if it triggers negative emotions and discomfort. Facing Reality Many of our clients are in a position of power and authority. They have management roles at global companies that are industry leaders. Pride in your organisation is great, but sometimes we can be so bullish about the company we work for, that we don’t realise how others see our brand from the outside. Yes, the client’s company may be a good employer, but if we believe in our own organisation’s PR too much, we may not be able to understand why a lot of qualified professionals are turning down job offers to join the team. Some positions are not as thrilling to candidates as our clients expect. Corporate clients understandably want more choices, a bigger and better pool of candidates, so they can cherry-pick from a strong shortlist. But often that’s not realistic. For example, sometimes we present our short list to a client, after conducting a lot of due diligence and sorting through hundreds of resumes. The client is not satisfied because they imagine there should be a much bigger pool of willing, capable candidates for the position. However, as professional recruiters, we already know that this job really isn’t in such great demand. We are certain, because we talk to thousands of candidates each year and have our finger on the pulse of the labour market. In cases like this a good recruiter will try to advise clients that the short-listed candidates are the best choices available. But it’s not always easy for clients to hear this truth, if they have come to believe to strongly in their organisation’s own PR. Likewise, if a recruiter is too positive and hopeful, or afraid of expressing negative sentiments to the client, we can waste a lot of time searching for a needle in a haystack. Sometimes clients can be too positive about their team and company, to the point that it blinds them to the harsh reality of the marketplace.  I’ve seen unrealistic positivity hurt organisations that always think they can do better; they reject viable candidates, leaving roles vacant longer than necessary. Whether you are a recruiter or an HR manager it’s important to be honest with yourself, and look clearly at market intel, without emotion. Should I stay or should I go? Many Thais struggle to maintain a positive attitude about an unfulfilling job. I wish I had 100 baht for every time I’ve heard this: I want to leave my job. I mean, it’s great, I get a good salary, but the job is killing me. I work six days a week, 12 hours or more per day, and my boss expects me always to be on-call. It takes a lot of mental energy to stay positive in a situation like this. We’ve all been there. We look at the positive, ignore the negative and remain in denial. We stay in an unsustainable situation for short-term financial stability; because of financial need, or because of fear. Today, conversations about work in Thailand increasingly revolve around psychology and mental health, the “work-life balance.” The traditional unquestioning respect for authority and hierarchy is creating a bit of a generational clash in the workplace. Many of my friends feel depressed about their jobs. But they don’t want to reveal their frustration, they keep it all inside, because they fear losing face. They don’t want anyone to know they are unhappy. From the outside, it looks like they are successful, with a prestigious job, but they are deeply unsatisfied with their quality of life. They will never tell HR about their discontent, or ask their boss for more money, a five-day work week, or a cap on unpaid overtime. If your job is making you miserable, it’s time for a change. You need to talk to someone about it. If you put all your efforts into projecting a positive image, the problem will only get worse, and could affect your mental health. In cases like this, maintaining a positive image prevents us from making a necessary career move. The struggle to stay positive can become toxic when it contradicts our own self-interest. The Human Factor In the recruitment industry, the reality is we do not have control. It’s almost impossible to forecast human behaviour. People make unpredictable decisions, and sometimes things don’t go the way we expect. Handling and anticipating this ‘human factor’ is what separates great recruiters from the pack. We interview candidates and ask questions that we already know the answer to. Why do we ask, if we already know the answer? Because we are looking for greater understanding and insight into what motivates a candidate; a good recruiter studies body language and can read between the lines to look more deeply into a candidate’s response. It is really important for recruiters to ‘trust their gut’, and not be overly optimistic. For example, sometimes we can tell if a passive candidate is not serious about making a move, and is just testing out the waters to see what’s out there. Maybe they made it to a final interview, but didn’t accept a good offer. Maybe some details about their personal life suggest they may relocate soon, or will grow weary of a long commute. Maybe they are having relationship problems at home and are in a bit of turmoil. This is crucially important information. This is why we place so much emphasis at JacksonGrant at forming long-term relationships with both clients and candidates. Too often a recruiter will keep a candidate in their active talent pools, continue sending them out for interviews, because they are attractive candidates on paper, and will impress a client. We may try to be positive, and think this time will be different – even though we know deep down this candidate doesn’t have their heart set on a new job; we are in denial. This is a mild form of toxic positivity that recruiters must beware of. How to foster authentic positivity in the workplace How do we know when we’ve taken positivity too far? Sometimes we try too hard to maintain a positive attitude. If the happiness you project is not authentic, if you are merely keeping up appearances, it can eventually affect your mental health. Toxic positivity exists because people feel they can’t be honest in their workplace. Companies should provide a safe space for employees to talk about problems at work, without fear of repercussions or consequences. This can help overall productivity and job satisfaction. It also gives employers valuable insights on team morale, HR policies, and office culture.   At JacksonGrant, we use an app called Happily. It enables employers and employees to talk anonymously, which opens a new channel of honest communication with management. It’s important to give employees freedom to express themselves. Just as individuals get stressed and have mental health problems when they suppress their feelings, a company’s morale will decline and HR problems will fester if they are not brought to light. Management will not understand their workforce if everyone is pretending to love their job, when the reality is quite different. Reach out to a recruiter If you think it is time to make a career move; if your company has a key position that is challenging to fill; or if you’re an HR professional looking for ways to strengthen internal communication, our recruitment team at JacksonGrant can help. Please feel free to reach out with any questions, concerns, or feedback at supak@jacksongrant.io

View
The Benefits of Networking
Jul
24
The Benefits of Networking

Recently I have been able to attend more networking events. Building a professional network can significantly improve your career prospects, so I thought it might be a good time to share these eight benefits of networking:  Confidence It is human nature to question whether a new person will like me; it’s natural to feel awkward when meeting someone for the first time, or to struggle a bit trying to break the ice. But the reality is that these apprehensions exist mainly in your mind. The more you meet new people and strike up conversations in social settings, the more your confidence will increase. Over time this confidence will grow, enhancing different areas of your life. You’ll be more confident at work, and feel more comfortable meeting new people. Opportunities Networking gives us the opportunity to significantly expand your circle of contacts. It can open up opportunities that would not be possible by cold-calling or sending emails to the same people. At networking events you get to meet professionals in a more informal setting (and the occasional formal setting). If you click socially, it can directly lead to business opportunities. Or even better, you might make a new lifelong friend! Knowledge and Insights For me networking provides a huge learning opportunity. A lot of the news that we read and consume comes from social media or abridged articles on the internet. When you network it gives you the opportunity to connect with individuals from diverse backgrounds and industries. Engaging in conversations and sharing ideas can provide valuable insights, industry trends, and knowledge exchange. You can learn from the firsthand experiences of others, gain new perspectives, and stay updated on the latest market developments. Career Advancement  Building a strong professional network can greatly enhance your career prospects. Networking enables you to establish connections with influential people who can offer guidance, referrals, or even job opportunities. Through networking events, industry conferences, or online platforms, you can meet potential employers, recruiters, and experts in your field. I should state that it is a mistake in networking to sell yourself before you know if the person you have connected with is interested in what you’re offering – it’s important to ‘read the room;’ otherwise, your well-intentioned approach could come across as annoying.   Personal Development Networking isn't just about professional growth – it can also contribute to your personal development. By interacting with a diverse range of individuals, you can improve your communication, interpersonal, and relationship-building skills. Networking often involves stepping out of your comfort zone, which helps build confidence and adaptability. Access to a larger business community Through networking, you gain access to a wide range of people. Your network can provide information, advice, recommendations, or connections to valuable resources such as funding, suppliers, service providers, or specialised knowledge. Having a diverse network ensures you have a pool of resources readily available when needed. Reputation and Visibility Networking helps you establish and enhance your professional reputation. By actively participating and contributing to your field or industry, you can gain visibility and recognition. This can lead to increased opportunities, invitations to speak at conferences, or being sought after for collaborations and partnerships. It’s a great way to ‘build your brand.’  Long-Term Relationships Building meaningful connections through networking often results in long-term relationships. These relationships can extend beyond professional interactions and become friendships or mentorships. Maintaining and nurturing these relationships can lead to ongoing support, guidance, and mutual growth. I often have to remind myself that networking is a continuous process that requires effort, active participation, and genuine interest in building relationships. The benefits may not be immediate, but they can have a lasting impact on your personal and professional life. Prioritise it, stick with it, and reap the rewards! If you’re interested to attend professional networking events in Thailand, here are some good resources: The American Chamber of Commerce in Thailand (AMCHAM) : Event The British Chamber of Commerce Thailand : Event Please reach out to me directly if your organisation is interested in co-hosting a networking event with JacksonGrant, or if you’d like more information about professional networking in Thailand: alexander@jacksongrant.io  

View
The Power of Strong Relationships in the Recruitment Business
Jul
17
The Power of Strong Relationships in the Recruitment Business

JacksonGrant’s Secret of Success is Trust – This is How we Build Long-Term Client Partnerships Next month I will celebrate my first anniversary with JacksonGrant. When I first started working here last year, I was assigned to manage a key account with a big client that JacksonGrant had enjoyed a close working relationship for years prior to my arrival. It would be my responsibility to maintain, strengthen and grow this partnership. The importance of cultivating and fostering long-term client relationships is crucial to the success of every business; especially for a mid-sized regional recruitment agency. Building close, sustainable client partnerships is what sets JacksonGrant apart; it’s the hallmark of our success. So I put a lot of energy and effort into making this client feel valued and appreciated. I handled many tasks for the client myself, assisting their HR team in every way possible. During the past year, I managed to build our recruitment consulting business with them significantly, by focusing on cultivating a healthy, mutually beneficial relationship. Working with JacksonGrant, I have learned to collaborate on a more personal level with clients. This approach to recruitment almost makes me feel like I am part of their in-house HR team, more than an external consultant. Every problem I manage to solve for them builds trust. I constantly offer them assistance proactively, so their HR department can benefit from my feedback and two decades of recruitment experience. When our contract expired, the client was happy to renew and expand our business partnership. Because of my ability to maintain and strengthen this ongoing relationship, JacksonGrant has been hired to help with even more projects moving forward. Continuity is Key to Fostering Client Relationships There is lots of turnover in the fast-paced world of recruitment; establishing and nurturing strong client relationships is a critical component of long-term success. This can only be done successfully if the recruitment agency values and instills a culture of partnership. JacksonGrant’s recruitment business is built on trust, collaboration, and delivering exceptional results for clients. Today I want to share six aspects of relationship-building that contribute to building trust, establishing solid partnerships, and driving overall success. You should always look for a recruiter that has these qualities: 1. Establish Trust and Credibility: Trust is the cornerstone of any successful client relationship in the recruitment business. By consistently delivering on promises, maintaining open and transparent communication, and demonstrating a deep understanding of clients' needs, recruiters can establish themselves as trusted advisors. When clients trust their recruiters to find the best candidates for their organisation, it lays the foundation for a strong and enduring partnership. 2. Understand Each Clients’ Unique Needs: Effective recruitment relationships are built on a deep understanding of clients' unique needs and organisational culture. Recruiters must invest the time required to fully comprehend the client's business goals, industry landscape, and specific requirements for each role. By taking the time to truly understand clients' needs, recruiters can provide more targeted and effective recruitment solutions, ensuring the right fit for both the employer and the candidate. 3. Tailored Recruitment Strategies: Strong client relationships allow recruiters to tailor their recruitment strategies to meet the specific requirements of each client. By understanding the client's hiring preferences, timeline, and desired candidate profiles, recruiters can customise the sourcing, screening, and selection process. This personalised approach saves time and effort; it also increases the likelihood of successful placements and long-term satisfaction. 4. Open Communication and Collaboration: Successful client relationships thrive on open and effective communication. Recruiters must maintain regular contact with clients throughout the recruitment process, providing updates, sharing candidate profiles, and seeking feedback. This collaborative approach fosters a sense of partnership and ensures that recruiters and clients are on the same page at every stage. By actively involving clients in the decision-making process, recruiters make more informed choices and deliver results that align with the client's vision and work culture. 5. Proactive Problem-Solving: Strong client relationships empower recruiters to be proactive problem-solvers. When challenges or obstacles arise during the recruitment process, recruiters who have earned the trust of clients can quickly and easily address and resolve problems together. Whether it's adjusting the candidate profile, modifying the recruitment strategy, or addressing unexpected hurdles, a collaborative and solution-oriented approach strengthens the partnership and demonstrates the recruiter's commitment to delivering value. 6. Continuous Value Delivery: Successful client relationships go beyond individual placements; they focus on delivering ongoing value to the client. Recruiters can provide additional support and services, such as talent market insights, competitor analysis, or industry trends, to help clients stay ahead in a competitive talent landscape. By continuously providing value and being a trusted advisor, recruiters can become long-term strategic partners. Partner with JacksonGrant In the recruitment business, strong client relationships are essential for building trust, fostering partnerships, and driving overall success. If you’d like to learn more about our approach to recruiting, please feel free to reach out, I’m always happy to help: sureeporn@jacksongrant.io  

View
What do new technologies entering the APAC region mean for skills-based hiring? 
Jul
10
What do new technologies entering the APAC region mean for skills-based hiring? 

The Asia-Pacific region has always been a place of industrial innovation and economic growth. In recent years, the importance of evolving technologies in logistics, infrastructure, life sciences, and manufacturing industries has become increasingly pronounced. Despite a general hiring slowdown, businesses in the manufacturing, logistics, infrastructure, and logistics industries still have high demand for cutting-edge tech skills.   Yet according to the IDC, the tech skills shortage affects 60% to 80% of Asia-Pacific organisations, highlighting the urgent need for skilled professionals to meet the demands of the evolving landscape. As the region embraces automation, robotics, AI, and other cutting-edge technologies, addressing this skills gap becomes imperative for organisations to stay competitive and drive sustainable development. Efforts to bridge this gap through skills-based hiring and continuous learning initiatives are crucial for unlocking the full potential of the Asia-Pacific region's industrial prowess.  New Technologies in Logistics, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, and Manufacturing  Here are some of the evolving technologies that are reshaping the logistics, infrastructure, life sciences, and manufacturing industries in the Asia-Pacific region, revolutionising processes and driving innovation:  Logistics  Automation and robotics are revolutionising warehousing and supply chain management, improving efficiency and reducing human error. The Internet of Things (IoT) enables real-time tracking and monitoring, enhancing visibility and supply chain transparency.  These advancements call for new skills, including proficiency in warehouse automation systems, robotics, and data analytics for supply chain optimisation.  Infrastructure  Smart Cities increasingly use technology and data to enhance urban living, from efficient energy management to smart mobility solutions and intelligent transportation systems use advanced technologies for traffic management, reducing congestion and improving safety.  To navigate this evolving landscape, and make informed decisions around sustainable development, professionals need knowledge of smart city concepts and technologies alongside knowledge of the design and use of virtual simulations for infrastructure design and management.     Life Sciences  In the life sciences industry genomics is increasingly allowing the use of individual DNA for developing personalised treatment plans. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is transforming drug discovery and development by analysing vast amounts of data and identifying potential candidates.  These advancements call for skills in genomic data analysis and interpretation and experience using AI algorithms for drug discovery is vital for leveraging AI's potential to accelerate the development of new therapies and enhance patient care.    Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) allows for the creation of complex designs, reducing waste, and improving customisation. The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) connects machines and devices, helping optimise operations by improving real-time data collection and analysis. Predictive maintenance uses data analytics and machine learning to predict equipment failures and reduce downtime.   Employers are looking for candidates with experience of additive manufacturing technologies and an understanding of IIoT and predictive maintenance strategies to drive efficient and cost-effective manufacturing operations.    The talent pool in Thailand is still relatively small for these emerging skillsets. Meaning employers need to think outside the box and develop new skills-based hiring talent to attract skilled but relatively cost-effective new hires.   5 strategies to help identify critical skills during the hiring process  Skills-based hiring is an approach to recruitment and selection that focuses on identifying and evaluating candidates based on the specific skills and competencies required for a particular job or role. Rather than relying solely on traditional qualifications or credentials, skills-based hiring emphasises assessing a candidate's ability to perform specific tasks and contribute to organisational success. To help identify candidates with the right experience and critical skills during the hiring and interviewing process, you can adopt the following strategies:   Rework job postings and descriptions Traditional job descriptions that list every single role requirement and responsibility often turn into wish lists. In a skills-based hiring model long descriptions and job postings are redundant.  An ideal job description should be short and to the point. Lists of expectations and responsibilities can be included but the emphasis should be on the specific skills and competencies required including adaptability and a willingness to learn and use new technologies. Avoid using jargon and internal acronyms.   Use structured interviews and assessmentsStructured interviews and assessments play a crucial role in skills-based hiring. Using these techniques makes it easier to identify a candidate’s skills, ensuring you select candidates who are well-equipped to excel in their roles. They also help keep interviews standardised, meaning every candidate has a fair and consistent experience.Adding situational questions in interviews gives you insights into a candidate’s ability to apply their skills in real-world scenarios. Or you might choose to use a separate technical assessment to directly test a candidate's proficiency in specific skills, such as coding, data engineering or software development. Focus on prior experience  Focusing on previous experience with relevant technologies and projects, and the impact and outcomes of their work, allows employers to assess a candidate's practical application of skills in real-world settings, providing concrete evidence of their abilities, their potential to deliver results and contribute to business success.  This approach provides a deeper understanding of a candidate's skill proficiency and increases the likelihood of finding candidates who can make a meaningful impact in their new roles. Choose candidates who are dedicated to continuous learning All businesses looking to embrace new technologies should be offering training programs and certifications and encouraging employees to participate in conferences and workshops to bridge the skills gap. If you are then you are going to want to hire candidates who will take advantage of this professional development. Candidates who show a proactive approach to learning are more likely to adapt to new technologies and acquire the skills necessary for future success. Look for evidence of commitment to personal and professional growth through their participation in ongoing training, certifications, or relevant industry events. Focus on building diverse and agile teams Diversity in skill sets and backgrounds brings a range of expertise and innovative thinking to the table driving innovation. Employers can use skills-based hiring to carefully assess candidates' unique skill sets, ensuring a complementary blend of abilities in their teams. By intentionally assembling diverse teams, you can tap into a broader range of skills and expertise. This is particularly in fields where older technologies and skills are used alongside emerging ones.    By embracing skills-based hiring as part of your wider talent attraction strategy you are up to five times more likely to hire candidates who are capable of performing at the highest level and who will bring the skills and expertise with them to keep your business at the cutting-edge.   As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates.  Learn more about JacksonGrant’s innovative service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.   

View
Have Traditional Resumes and Job Descriptions Become Redundant?
Jun
26
Have Traditional Resumes and Job Descriptions Become Redundant?

The race to find talent in the modern-day hiring process is growing more intense, and forcing us to re-think traditional recruitment methods. The Quickening Pace of Modern Life We live in a world that increasingly values immediate gratification. The pace of modern life is undoubtedly going to have a disruptive effect on hiring processes that for decades have remained fairly constant. I made my first placement as a recruiter more than 25 years ago; and the process was almost identical to the placement I made last week! But change is coming. Traditional Job Descriptions Lack Appeal for the New Generation                                                          Historically, recruitment usually starts with a fairly long job description. It lists all the responsibilities the employer is looking for. Often these are written with a narrow point of view that is inwardly focused, without much consideration for the wider target audience.  Job descriptions frequently contain acronyms used only within the company. A series of bullet points follows, enumerating all the required qualifications and experience that the applicant must have, for example:  Bachelor’s degree in business, engineering or related field Minimum 8 years’ experience as a supply chain manager At least 4 years in a leadership position The traditional job description is not enticing. It can appear stiff and aloof, off-putting to today’s next generation of up-and-coming talent. More importantly, these job descriptions often do not precisely describe exactly what and who is needed. Most Resumes are Uninspiring Then we look at resumes. Most candidates make their first resume when they graduate from school. Instead of properly updating and overhauling their resume every year or two, jobseekers usually just add job descriptions to their resume as they go through their careers. Most of the resumes I see simply list the responsibilities the candidate had in current and previous jobs – sometimes they just copy and paste the corporate job descriptions onto the document. Crafting an attractive resume requires more effort than this. Otherwise, you’ll end up with an uninspiring resume that fails to showcase your abilities and the best aspects of your character. Consult with a Professional Recruiter My role as a recruiter is to analyse job descriptions and resumes, and then to consult with both hiring managers and candidates to ‘bridge the gap,’ and get us to the short-list and interview stage as quickly as possible. The Talent Marketplace is Evolving Let’s start by looking at two vital trends in the talent market: First, candidates now expect companies to “sell” them on a job: in-demand talent will consider an employers’ image and culture more than ever before, placing a high value on ESG, DEI, and work-life balance. Secondly, it’s important to keep in mind that specific skills and experience quickly become out-of-date in today’s tech-driven marketplace. For candidates, demonstrating agility, eagerness and a propensity to learn are keys to growth and success. How to Write More Appealing Job Descriptions For hiring managers, it’s important to remember the goal of the job description is to attract the right candidate; it’s not necessary to list and describe every possible scenario that may occur on the job. Here are a few simple changes you can make to attract the best talent: Start from scratch: do not simply update the old job description Highlight the company’s shared values Keep the list of responsibilities concise Avoid the use of internal company terms and acronyms Requirements and qualifications should focus more on skills and character than specific experience Always include information about career development Update Your Resume, Get More Interviews Here are a few tips on how to present yourself in the best possible light. Remember, the goal of your CV is to get an interview – you can worry about landing the job later! As you go through your current resume, look for all areas that can be updated. This document needs to represent who you are today. For example: You may have described in great detail the responsibilities of a job that you left 10 years ago. But that role is less relevant to your professional profile than more recent positions. So revise the job descriptions accordingly, to emphasise the talents and capabilities you possess now, and focus less on the jobs that served as stepping stones. Write a concise statement describing yourself to provide immediate impact Start your career history with your most recent job Focus on achievements more than responsibilities Include some information about your life outside the workplace – interests, activities, sports, charity work Keep it simple – your resume should not be longer than two pages As you read the resume, ask yourself: Would YOU want to meet and interview the person described in this document? Keep Evolving, Keep Adapting The nature of work has changed a great deal and will continue to do so. Some jobs will be taken over by AI, some jobs will disappear. There are always new jobs appearing – such as Prompt Engineers – but most jobs will just continue to evolve as skillsets become redundant more quickly. Therefore, companies will rely more and more on hiring and retaining talent with the right mindset, character, and capabilities to learn new things, build strong relationships, and develop new skills. With all these changes, there is one constant: Employers’ job descriptions and jobseekers’ resumes are key to attaining mutual success and happiness. If you would like to discuss how to optimise your company’s job descriptions or how to polish your resume, please feel free to reach out to me at LinkedIn  

View
Working For Multinational Companies in Thailand: Challenges And Opportunities
Jun
12
Working For Multinational Companies in Thailand: Challenges And Opportunities

Are you the type of candidate that multinational companies are looking for? Which international organisations attract the best local talent? Thailand’s labour market offers ample opportunities, but also challenges for both job-seekers and the multinational companies they aspire to work for. A handful of multinationals are overwhelmingly preferred by candidates due to their office culture, generous compensation & benefits, and career opportunities. For candidates, competition is intense, and the bar is high: there is a wide skills gap between what international employers need and what most job seekers in Thailand have to offer. Candidates who have skills in high demand can easily find work in Thailand's industrialised areas: Bangkok, the Eastern Seaboard, Chiang Mai, and Phuket. Conversely, candidates who lack the requisite skills and qualifications will find it more difficult to find work with a multinational organisation. Thailand Is Still Attractive To Foreign Investors For multinational companies, Thai labour is relatively cheap. Compared to other developed countries in the region, Thailand is an attractive place to set up factories and manufacturing facilities. Many organisations in the tourism, service, and technology industries are thriving by leveraging Thailand's skilled workforce to support their regional and global operations. The ease of doing business in Thailand has improved in recent years, with policies encouraging foreign direct investment, tax incentives, and streamlined regulations. However, multinational organisations need to be aware of labor laws, regulations, and cultural expectations in Thailand. Policies regarding working hours, annual leave, and holiday pay may be different from what European, Japanese, or American managers are accustomed to. Like everywhere else in the world, companies that prioritise social responsibility, diversity, community support, and sustainability will attract the strongest candidates in Thailand. These are my observations from more than 20 years working in human resources and as a recruitment consultant in Thailand, especially with multinational organisations. I hope these insights can give candidates a better understanding of what international companies are looking for, and give employers a better chance to attract ideal candidates. Please keep in mind, these are generalisations, not hard-and-fast rules. They are honest observations from my personal experience with both candidates and employers. What Qualifications Are Multinational Employers Looking For In Thailand? The ideal candidate varies depending on the specific job and industry, but generally employers are looking for candidates who possess the following qualities: ·       Relevant education and work experience - Employers prefer candidates who have education and work experience that is relevant to the job they are hiring for. This shows that the candidate has the necessary knowledge and skills to perform well without much additional training or investment. ·       Strong work ethic - Employers place a high value on punctuality, dedication, and a willingness to work hard. Candidates who demonstrate a strong work ethic are highly sought after. ·       Good communication skills – Thai candidates who possess strong oral and written communication skills in English or a third language are highly valued. This is especially important for roles that involve working with customers, clients, or colleagues from different backgrounds. ·       Adaptability - Employers appreciate candidates who are flexible and can adapt to new environments and changes in the workplace. Being adaptable allows individuals to be more productive, innovative, and able to thrive in different scenarios. ·       Positive attitude - Employers look for candidates who are highly motivated, with a positive attitude. Candidates who have a positive attitude inspire other team members and boost morale. ·       Interpersonal skills - Candidates with strong interpersonal skills, such as empathy, emotional intelligence, resilience, time management, teamwork, conflict resolution, active listening, and an ability to persuade others are highly valued. These skills are especially desirable for customer service, sales, and management positions. ·       High-tech or industrial manufacturing skills and experience - Companies look for candidates who possess specific technical skills or industry experience that can benefit business operations. ·       Experience working for an international company, or overseas - Candidates who were educated overseas and/or who have previous experience working for an international organisation are prized assets in Thailand, and command higher salaries. They require less training, adapt more easily to the company culture, and effectively serve as liaisons between foreign management and local staff. Which International Companies Attract The Best Local Thai Talent? The most talented Thais prefer to work for multinational organisations that offer a positive office environment, competitive compensation, opportunities for personal growth and career development. The work-life balance proposition has become increasingly important. In addition, the best Thai candidates are drawn to organisations that have a good reputation, are socially responsible, and contribute to the community. The ideal multinational organisations for candidates in Thailand possess the following qualities: ·       Strong Corporate Culture - Multinational organisations with a strong corporate culture rate highly for employee satisfaction, engagement, and loyalty. These are companies that promote diversity, inclusion, and teamwork. ·       Good Compensation and Benefits - Competitive salaries, annual bonuses, health benefits, retirement plans, and paid holidays are essential to job satisfaction and employee retention in Thailand. ·       Career Growth Opportunities - Organisations that offer career advancement opportunities and training programmes will attract and retain the best Thai candidates. Ambitious employees relish the chance to learn new skills, grow their knowledge and experience. Opportunities to work overseas are especially attractive. ·       Work-life Balance – Quality of life is crucial for employees in Thailand. Multinational organisations that offer flexible working arrangements such as telecommuting, flexible hours, and parental leave enjoy high levels of employee satisfaction. ·       Social Responsibility and Community Support - Multinationals that contribute positively to the community are viewed more favourably in Thailand. Candidates tend to seek employment with companies that display social responsibility by giving back to the local community, and demonstrate environmental responsibility. ·       Work From Home (WFH) - In Thailand, WFH has become more common and increasingly popular since the COVID-19 pandemic. Many businesses shifted to remote work models to ensure the health and safety of their employees. With the rise of technological advancements, WFH has become a viable and efficient option for many organisations. For employees, working from home provides more flexibility and eliminates the time, cost, and stress of commuting. For businesses, the transition to WFH may require additional investment in technology and resources. They must also create policies and guidelines to maintain productivity, staff morale, motivation and team-building. JacksonGrant: Experience Finding The Right Candidate For The Right Organisation As a recruitment consultant working with both job-seekers and employers,  I am routinely exposed to a high volume of candidates from all walks of life, and numerous multinational companies from around the globe looking for talent in Thailand. I work closely with hiring managers and HR departments to identify job vacancies, understand workforce needs, and develop recruitment strategies to find the best candidates. I screen and vet potential candidates to create a shortlist, then arrange interviews or further assessment to evaluate their character and suitability for the position. My job is to ensure that both candidates and clients are happy: This is essential for a successful outcome, and sustainable business relationships. I am passionate about helping organisations find the right candidates, and helping candidates find the right jobs. If your company is looking to hire overseas talent, or if you are interested to work for an international company with operations in Thailand, I’m happy to help. Please reach out via email: surichai@jacksongrant.io  

View
10 signs you need an RPO partner
May
29
10 signs you need an RPO partner

Are you an employer in Thailand struggling to free up sufficient internal talent acquisition or HR resources to support your long-term recruitment requirements? This can lead to recruitment challenges such as high turnover, difficulty in finding qualified candidates, compliance issues, and time-consuming hiring processes. If this sounds familiar, you're not alone. Many employers in Thailand face these common problems, which can hinder their ability to attract and retain top talent, and ultimately impact their business performance. However, there is a solution - Recruitment Process Outsourcing. How Recruitment Process Outsourcing works RPO is a hiring method where a third-party provider acts as an extension of a business’s internal recruitment team. An RPO partner can streamline hiring, enhance candidate quality, and manage all aspects of the hiring process at volume . In comparison to contingent recruiters, who divide their time across multiple clients and are paid only when a candidate is successfully place in a role, RPO partners assign dedicated consultants who focus on the needs of one client over a long period of time. This makes for a more efficient and effective services. JacksonGrant’s unique Recruitment as a Service model (RaaS) takes the best elements of RPO and combines it with aspects of Project Recruitment and Executive Search. RaaS is an integration of the full breadth of JacksonGrant’s resources, giving you access to a fully customisable, integrated, sustainable, and holistic talent acquisition solution. In addition to identifying talent for specific roles, our team can provide up to date talent market intelligence in your sector, and strategic advisory, right up to executive search support. Benefits of using an RPO service Using a Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO) service offers several benefits for employers, including: Speed Dedicated resources and expertise to streamline the recruitment process, resulting in faster time-to-fill for vacant positions. Volume hiringEfficiently handle high-volume recruitment needs, such as during peak hiring seasons or for large-scale expansion plans. Candidate qualityRobust screening and assessment techniques to identify top-quality candidates who are the right fit for the organisation. Strategy supportGuidance and insights to optimise recruitment strategies, aligning them with business goals. Cost-effectiveCost-effective recruitment solutions that reduce recruitment costs and improve ROI. ScalabilityServices can be easily scaled up or down based on your hiring needs, providing flexibility and adaptability. Compliance expertiseEnsure compliance with relevant labour laws and regulations. Technology and innovationAccess to cutting edge, specialist, global recruitment technology. These valuable tools are specifically designed to provide best-in-class recruitment process. Access new talent poolsExtensive networks and talent pools that increase your chances of sourcing the right candidates. 10 signs you need an RPO partner : If RPO sounds like it might be the solution for you but you’re still unsure if the challenges you’re facing require RPO support here are ten signs that connecting with an RPO partner, like JacksonGrant, could be beneficial for your hiring: 1. You need to hire at volume If you have large-scale hiring needs with multiple positions to fill on a regular basis it can be difficult for smaller internal hiring teams to manage the recruitment process efficiently and effectively. Working with an RPO partner can help you generate and filter large numbers of applications and provide you with the industry experience and resources to manage large-scale recruitment campaigns.  2. You’re having difficulty finding qualified candidatesRPO providers have access to a wider talent pool supported by specialised databases, networks, and recruitment tools. If you are struggling to find qualified candidates these tools can help identify and attract qualified candidates more effectively.  3. Vacancies are taking a long time to fillLong time-to-fill periods for open positions can be an indication of inefficient recruitment processes or a lack of resources. 55% of candidates believe it should take less than two weeks from first interview to job offer. If your recruitment process is longer than that you could be losing out on the best candidates. An RPO partner can streamline your recruitment process, reduce time-to-fill, and ensure that you don’t miss out on top talent due to delays. 4. You don’t have access to recruitment expertiseIf your internal HR team lacks the necessary expertise in recruitment, it can result in ineffective sourcing strategies, poor candidate experience, and ultimately, subpar hiring outcomes. An RPO partner brings specialised recruitment expertise and best practices, including market insights, sourcing strategies, assessment techniques, and employer branding, which can enhance the quality of your hires. 5. Your recruitment is cost and resource heavyManaging the recruitment process in-house can be resource-intensive and costly, involving expenses such as job postings, recruitment tools, background checks, and interview logistics. Outsourcing your recruitment process to an RPO provider can provide cost-effective solutions, as they can leverage economies of scale and optimise recruitment resources. 6.    You need your recruitment efforts to scaleIf your hiring needs fluctuate seasonally or due to rapid business growth, you may need to scale your recruitment processes quickly. An RPO partner can provide the flexibility to scale up or down the recruitment process based on your organisation's needs, without the need for significant internal restructuring. 7. You’d like your talent acquisition to be more strategic An RPO partner can help elevate your talent acquisition function from a transactional approach to a strategic one. RPO providers can work closely with your organisation's leadership team to align recruitment strategies with business goals, create robust talent pipelines, and implement workforce planning and analytics to drive strategic talent acquisition initiatives. 8. You’re expanding into an unfamiliar geographical locationIf your organisation is expanding its operations into Thailand, navigating local recruitment practices, cultural nuances, and compliance requirements can be complex. An RPO partner, such as JacksonGrant, offers local expertise that can help you effectively manage recruitment across Thailand and Southeast Asia, ensuring compliance and consistency in hiring practices. 9. You are experiencing high turnover or low retention rates84% of Thai businesses are worried about retaining skills and expertise. High turnover or low retention rates may indicate issues in your recruitment process or candidate selection. An RPO partner can conduct thorough candidate assessments, background and reference checks to ensure that you are hiring candidates who are the right fit for your organisation, reducing turnover and improving retention rates. 10. Your focus is on core business functionsIf your organisation wants to focus on its core business functions and doesn't want to allocate significant resources to manage the recruitment process internally, partnering with an RPO provider can allow you to outsource the recruitment function while maintaining focus on your core competencies. Outsourcing your recruitment to JacksonGrant’s RaaS model Whether you are based in Thailand or are an international entity looking to break into the Thai engineering and technical markets outsourcing your recruitment to JacksonGrant has never been easier or more effective. As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Our distinctive Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) model means you always have access to a bespoke, cost-effective strategy that achieves the right outcomes for your business and can adapt quickly and easily to your changing goals and the fast-paced global market.  Learn more about JacksonGrant’s unique RaaS service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
Cross-Cultural Understanding: How Thai, Japanese, and Western Work Cultures Differ
May
22
Cross-Cultural Understanding: How Thai, Japanese, and Western Work Cultures Differ

Working with colleagues from different cultures can present challenges and opportunities. Cross-cultural working environments have become increasingly common in today’s interconnected world. These environments bring together individuals from different cultural backgrounds, each with their own unique perspectives, beliefs, and traditions. While these diverse cultures can foster creativity, innovation, and a broad range of ideas, they can also present challenges. One of the most significant challenges of working in a cross-cultural environment is communication - or more specifically, miscommunication. Misunderstandings and confusion can occur when people have different cultural interpretations of speech and body language. To overcome these differences, it is essential to ensure that everyone is speaking the same language, both literally and figuratively. Another challenge is cultural differences in work ethics and practices. Different cultures have varying attitudes towards punctuality, hierarchy, and the importance of workplace relationships. To avoid friction, it is important to appreciate and respect these differences by adapting and finding common ground. Cultural diversity also creates opportunities for personal and professional growth. By embracing cultural differences, individuals can gain new perspectives and develop cross-cultural skills, becoming more empathetic and globally aware. I’d like to share my observations from more than 20 years working in cross-cultural environments with Thai, Japanese, and Western organisations. I hope these insights can lead to greater understanding and appreciation amongst colleagues. Please keep in mind, these are generalisations; there are always exceptions to these cultural norms, but they are honest observations from my personal work experience with American, European, and Asian companies. Thai Working Culture:  Thai working culture places great value on respect, harmony, and enjoyment in the workplace, with an emphasis on hierarchy and personal relationships. Here are some general observations to help understand how Thais approach work relationships. Respect for authority – Thai working culture places great emphasis on respect for authority figures such as managers or bosses. This is reflected in the use of formal titles and language. Hierarchy and seniority – Thais also place great importance on hierarchy and seniority. Senior employees are expected to make the decisions. Younger employees are expected to show deference and respect. Thai working culture is hierarchical, and employees are expected to show this respect to their superiors, not only during working hours, but whenever they meet. Politeness and saving face – Thai employees value politeness and courtesy. They are extremely sensitive to avoiding embarrassment or loss of face, to themselves or others. This means that they may be hesitant to offer criticism or feedback – when they do express themselves, especially to superiors, they will soften their opinions. Indirect communication – Thai people prefer indirect communication. This is considered polite behaviour. To express strong opinions, or to say ‘No’ directly could be considered rude.  Loyalty and harmony - The concept of sanuk, or sabai sabai (that life should be fun, lighthearted and enjoyable) is important in Thai culture. This notion is often prioritised over individual ambition or competition. As a result, loyalty to the team and maintaining harmony are highly valued.  Work-life balance, and the value of family and relationships – Although Thai people work hard, they place a big priority on their personal lives. It is common practice to take time off from work to attend family events and celebrate traditional religious holidays. Thai culture values relationships, so building a strong relationship with your Thai coworkers is important to maintain a positive working environment. Gift-giving and hospitality - Thais are known for their hospitality and generosity. Gift-giving is common in many situations, including business meetings. Be aware that if you politely refuse a gift, it may be taken as a rejection, rather than an expression of humility. Cooperation & respect - Thai working culture is more cooperative and mutually respectful: employees are expected to work together to achieve company goals. Japanese working culture: Punctuality and focus – Being on-time is a crucial aspect of Japanese work culture. Tardiness is seen as a sign of disrespect. Employees are expected to arrive on time and studiously focus on their work. Long working hours and overtime – Japanese employees are known to work long hours, sometimes up to 12 hours a day. This is considered an indicator of dedication and commitment to the company. Employees are often expected to work beyond scheduled business hours, even if there is no overtime compensation. Collective and group harmony – Japanese working culture emphasises group harmony. Employees are expected to prioritise the needs of the group over individuals. Harmony and unity are of paramount importance, and employees are expected to work together towards a common goal. Respect for hierarchy – Japan's hierarchical culture is deeply ingrained in the workplace. Age, seniority, and rank play an important role in how employees interact with each other. Employees must always keep their superiors informed: Every decision, no matter how small, should go through the chain of command and get the stamp of approval from the boss. Employees should immediately report any problems to their bosses before trying to take care of it on their own.  Work life balance – The concept of work-life balance is not as prevalent as in other countries. Employees of Japanese companies are expected to prioritise work over their personal lives. Formal or indirect communication – To avoid confrontation, Japanese communication is often formal, polite, and indirect. Openly expressing personal opinions or criticising others is considered disrespectful. Lifetime employment – In the past, Japanese companies would offer lifetime employment to their employees. While not as common today, this practice does persist in some sectors. Many Japanese companies still offer long-term job security and good benefits. We can see a higher proportion of Japanese employees who work most of their lives and retire from the same company, compared to other cultures. Loyalty & respect – Loyalty and respect for the organisation and its members are highly valued, and employees are expected to show respect to their superiors. The Japanese workplace is more formal: most staff wear a uniform or wear gray, navy, or black suits. Wearing ties and suits is common, even in the Thailand’s tropical summers. Hanging out after work & drinking – When the workday is over, Japanese colleagues go out to socialise with one another. They often hang out in karaoke bars or restaurants for nomikai, a drinking party. With everyone seated around one big table, co-workers are expected to drink, share meals, and engage in friendly conversation. Western Working Culture: Western cultures generally prioritise efficiency, productivity, and individual achievement in the workplace. In Europe and North America, employees are expected to work long hours, be competitive, and strive for professional success. The workplace is often hierarchical, with clear lines of authority and decision-making power. There is an emphasis on clear, direct communication and problem-solving. Compared to Asian office culture, Western employees are encouraged to speak up and share their opinions. Typical ‘farang’ work values also include: Individualism – The Western work culture is more individualistic; employees are expected to work independently to achieve their targets.  Punctuality – Being on-time is of the utmost importance. Employees are expected to arrive punctually for meetings and appointments. Direct communication – Westerners are known for a more direct communication style; they prefer to communicate their ideas and opinions clearly and openly. Europeans may be more indirect and reserved, while Americans tend to have a more direct and open style of communication. Attitude towards authority – In my experience, European organisations have a more relaxed attitude towards authority. American organisations often have a more hierarchical workplace structure, where greater deference is expected to be shown to the boss. Innovation and creativity – The work culture in American organisations is typically more focused on innovation and creativity, something that is greatly valued in start-ups and tech. European organisations tend to place more emphasis on tradition and legacy. Work-life balance – Western culture places great importance on work-life balance, and employees are generally given greater freedom to manage their time. Still, work is prioritised over personal life. Employees are expected to put in extra hours or work on weekends. Depending on the organisation, taking vacation time can be stigmatised or discouraged. In recent years, recognition of the importance of work-life balance has grown; many companies now are beginning to offer more flexible work arrangements. Diversity and inclusion – DEI is becoming more important to Western companies. Many organisations are striving to create a more diverse workforce and promote equality and inclusivity in the workplace. There is also a growing trend towards remote work and telecommuting, as technology makes it easier to work from anywhere in the world. Embrace Cultural Relativism Working in a cross-cultural environment requires embracing cultural relativism. This is the idea that a person’s beliefs and behaviours should not be judged, but better understood through the lens of the person’s own culture. The norms and values of one culture cannot be objectively evaluated by using the norms or values of another culture. If you are aware of different cultural norms, and put them in proper context, you will better understand the behaviour of your international colleagues, and forge more productive, mutually beneficial and friendly working relationships. For example, if you are an American or European coming to work in Thailand, you may want to adopt a softer approach – tone down strong opinions, and literally speak more softly to avoid being perceived as rude. If you are a Thai working for a western company, this may be a chance for you to come out of your shell a bit, and feel more free to express yourself without fear of losing face. If you are a Thai, American, or European joining a Japanese organisation, you should demonstrate respect for elders, and show great deference to senior executives. These are indispensable principles in a Japanese work environment. Japanese value decorum and respectability, in public and in the workplace, so if you keep this in mind it will help you gain face with your colleagues. By embracing cultural relativism, I’ve learned how to place high-calibre candidates who not only have the proper credentials and capabilities – I can tell when a candidate will fit into the new company culture, and when they might struggle a bit despite having the perfect resume. The Value of Cross-Cultural Work Relationships I love working in cross-cultural working environments with people from various backgrounds, who have been trained in different disciplines. I find their input helpful for my personal growth and progress. Because they are by design more diverse environments, cross-cultural workplaces are generally free from prejudice and discrimination. Each individual has a unique set of abilities and skills that other members of the team value and benefit from. Every day, when I am exposed to different cultures, working methods, and viewpoints, I develop and learn new things from others.  These experiences help me as a recruitment consultant role to better support the growth of my clients, especially multinationals expanding their operations in Southeast Asia.  If your company is looking to hire overseas talent, or if you are interested to work for an international company with operations in Thailand, I’m happy to help. Please reach and send me an email: Surichai@jacksongrant.io      

View
Looking for RPO services in Thailand? Try out RaaS
May
15
Looking for RPO services in Thailand? Try out RaaS

Recruitment Process Outsourcing or RPO recruitment is a popular recruiting model designed to help companies streamline their hiring process and improve the quality of their hires. RPO involves outsourcing some or all aspects of recruitment to a third-party provider who acts as an extension of your internal recruitment team. This can include sourcing and attracting candidates, screening and assessing them, and coordinating interviews and job offers for entire teams, departments, offices or locations.  JacksonGrant’s Recruitment as a Service model (RaaS) takes the best elements of RPO and combines it with the essentials from other recruitment models, such as Project Recruitment and Executive Search. This means you are able to access a fully integrated, sustainable and holistic talent acquisition solution which can be customised to suit your business. What is RPO recruitment and why use an RPO service? RPO providers use their expertise and technology to create a bespoke recruitment strategy that aligns with your unique business goals. By outsourcing recruitment, you can save time and resources, reduce recruitment costs, and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your hiring process. Helping you attract the best talent for your organisation at speed and scale. Recruitment Process Outsourcing can: 1. Lower hiring costsRPO can lower hiring costs in several ways. RPO providers use their industry expertise and access to recruitment technology to optimise recruitment processes, reducing the time and resources required to source, screen, and assess candidates. You can even reduce advertising and sourcing costs by tapping into an RPO service provider’s knowledge of the best recruitment channels for your needs. Additionally, RPO providers can leverage their network and database to attract and connect with high-quality candidates, reducing the need for expensive external recruiting resources.   2. Improve quality of hireDeveloping a customised recruitment strategy aligned to your business’ needs, goals and culture alongside the ability to attract and screen candidates more effectively ensures that only the most qualified candidates are presented for consideration.   3. Scale easilyBecause RPO models are flexible they can be scaled and adapted easily to meet your recruitment needs, respond to changes in demand or improve your access to specialised expertise. RPO providers can ramp up or down their recruitment efforts as needed meaning you are only ever paying for the support you really need.   4. Provide better reporting and analyticsBy leveraging technology to capture and analyse recruitment data, RPO providers can give you valuable insights into the effectiveness of your hiring process. The data collected can include metrics such as time-to-fill, cost-per-hire, and quality-of-hire. RPO providers use this data to identify areas for improvement, optimise recruitment processes, and help you make data-driven decisions about your recruitment strategy. By providing better reporting and analytics, RPOs can help you continuously improve your recruitment efforts and achieve better hiring outcomes. Unlike other RPO recruitment agencies, JacksonGrant's unique RaaS model helps you integrate all aspects of your recruitment process. Resulting in high rates of candidate engagement, optimised lead times and long-lasting placements, all whilst keeping your recruitment costs low. How can RPO benefit the Thai employment economy? Alongside improving hire quality and reducing costs, RPO recruitment brings other benefits to companies operating in Thailand that can not only improve their operating success but strengthen the Thai employment economy as a whole. RPO can contribute to: Retaining valuable skills and experience in the workforceProviding a positive candidate experience, developing a strong employer brand, and ensuring candidates with the right cultural fit are hired improves employee engagement, job satisfaction and retention. Meaning that the risk of valuable skills and experience leaving the business, industry or the workforce is reduced. RPO providers can also help end-clients develop effective onboarding and retention programs to further support employee retention.   Increasing the labour force participation of underrepresented groupsDeveloping targeted recruitment strategies that focus on diversity and inclusion and on attracting and screening candidates from diverse backgrounds, ensures the candidate pool is representative of the broader population. RPO providers can help businesses develop policies and practices that support diversity and inclusion, creating a more welcoming and inclusive workplace culture that encourages underrepresented groups, such as women, to apply for and remain in positions.   Supporting fast expansionBy providing the recruitment resources and expertise to rapidly scale up hiring efforts, RPO can help organisations quickly fill critical roles, expand their workforce, and enter new markets, enabling them to capitalise on growth opportunities and stay competitive in a rapidly changing business environment.   Accessing local talentHiring local talent can help businesses save costs associated with relocation, can speed up onboarding and increase employee engagement by fostering a sense of community. Most crucially, it gives you access to much-needed local knowledge and expertise. An RPO provider with experience in the Thai employment market can help you attract and retain local talent.   Complying with local regulationsThat local experience and understanding can also help you comply with local employment laws and regulations. Compliance with these regulations is essential to avoid legal issues, fines, and reputational damage. RPO providers can help businesses navigate complex regulatory environments and ensure that recruitment processes are compliant with local laws and regulations, mitigating risk and ensuring compliance.   Outsource your recruitment with JacksonGrant’s RaaS model Whether you are based in Thailand or are an international entity looking to break into the Thai engineering and technical markets, outsourcing your recruitment to JacksonGrant has never been easier or more effective. As Thailand's leading engineering and technical recruitment agency, we can support your expansion into Thailand and Southeast Asia and help you hire experienced, technically proficient, English-speaking candidates. Our distinctive Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) model means you always have access to a bespoke, cost-effective strategy that achieves the right outcomes for your business and can adapt quickly and easily to your changing goals and the fast-paced global market. Learn more about JacksonGrant’s unique RaaS service offering or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

View
Thailand’s Manufacturing Sector Faces Market Headwinds
May
8
Thailand’s Manufacturing Sector Faces Market Headwinds

Economic data reflects Thailand’s resilience amidst a looming global slowdown. Manufacturing industry executives are rightfully exercising caution. Hiring activity is subdued, but strong demand exists for specific skillsets.  The latest macroeconomic figures show an expected slowdown in Thailand’s industrial output, as slackening global demand continues to put downward pressure on exports. The good news is the drop in production activity is not as severe as predicted. Industrial production declined 2.71% in February, year-on-year. This is a slightly better performance than the 2.8% drop that market analysts had predicted (at one point a 4.81% drop was forecast). It’s the fifth straight month of decline in industrial output, but the pace of decline is less. Reduced consumption in belt-tightening Western countries, along with a weakened global demand for exports, may not necessarily indicate a recession, but we are watching these metrics closely. In Thailand, plastics and throw-away consumables, computers & peripherals (down 35% year-on-year), and garment manufacturing sectors are feeling the pain. Thailand’s Factories Continue To Show Resilience The Purchasing Managers’ Index March number was 53.1, a slight slowdown from February, but this is the fifth consecutive month we’ve seen improvement in this bellwether, which measures the volume of raw materials companies are purchasing. Thailand has one of most resilient global PMI figures. Domestic production rates are being maintained; I attribute this mainly to clearing a backlog of demand. Rising prices for raw materials and energy are having a negative effect on margins, and labour costs are going up. Petroleum, oil refining and automotive sectors are performing strongly.  The auto industry registering nearly 7% year-on-year growth. We have seen a significant increase in foreign direct investment in Thailand’s EV supply chain infrastructure, specifically from Chinese brands such as BYD and Changan. Overall factory output is expected to increase by 1.5-to-2.5% this year in Thailand, down from a previous forecast of 2.5-to-3.5%. Food product output is also growing steadily.  Hiring Outlook The executive leadership I have spoken to are feeling generally cautious. Some planned hiring and CAPEX decisions have been delayed. General hiring expansion is muted for many established businesses, with a few exceptions: as ever, we are seeing strong demand for certain technical expertise and niche subject-matter experts. Despite this, I am seeing a robust trend in senior leadership changes. It feels like we are entering a period of increased turnover in executive positions. I think this is because a lot of people in leadership positions feel weary; they have been in non-stop battle mode for the past three years. After enduring covid and navigating a volatile business landscape, people understandably want a change of scenery or a bit of time off.   Burnout is a real phenomenon. According to Deloitte’s 2023 Human Capital Trends report, 70% of C-suite executives are “seriously considering leaving for a job that better supports well-being.”  There is another reason we may be seeing some more changes at the top end of the hierarchy this year: during covid, many companies transitioned towards more sustainable local leadership. During the past two-to-three years, it has been more important to be close to your people. Besides, relocating executives around the world wasn’t especially practical with covid restrictions in place. Now that we’ve returned to normality, businesses are transforming once again. Many manufacturing operations are looking to bring in new perspectives and skills from outside of Thailand to optimise their business models and adapt. Strong Demand For Specific Skillsets Despite a general hiring reticence, manufacturing businesses still have high demand for cutting-edge tech skills in areas such as project management, and digital manufacturing. The talent pool in Thailand is still relatively small for these particular skillsets. As a result, we see a lot of opportunities for young engineering talent, mainly from Europe or North America, with companies that need tech-savvy talent, but can’t afford to populate their team with expats on expensive overseas relocation packages. Early-to-mid career millennials in their late 20s-early 30s are a source of attractive, relatively cost-effective new hires. These candidates are generally sought after for shorter term assignments. Thailand’s Learning Curve One of our clients recently set up a new factory in Thailand. They need dozens of talented high-value workers. But the technology being employed at their manufacturing facility is at the forefront of their field, and there simply are no advanced degree graduates within Thailand who are qualified to do this kind of work. So, the company is taking the novel approach of hiring local candidates and paying to send them overseas for advanced degrees. There has been significant government investment in production + logistics infrastructure. But not enough has been done to equip Thailand’s academic institutions to keep up with the ever-changing demands of the labour market. Efforts to fill the gap with Public-Private Partnerships may mitigate the talent shortage somewhat; the government has been working with technical colleges and corporate employers to create programmes to train Thai students in cutting-edge technology.  Speaking Of Infrastructure … The Thai government has reiterated its commitment to the 2.2 trillion-baht investment programme in the Eastern Economic Corridor. We are 18 months into the programme; infrastructure improvements should be completed by 2027.   Much of this investment is directed towards sectors where future technology is being developed, such as biotech. But we do not see enough concurrent investment in higher education to support this growth, in terms of staffing needs. JacksonGrant At Your Service Does your company have a need for professionals knowledgeable in the most advanced technology for manufacturing, marketing, food production, biotech, supply chain & logistics? Our recruitment consultants have extensive networks in specialised fields to help find the talent you need. Contact us to discuss your needs and see how we can support the optimisation of your business.

View
Management Trainee Programme Success Signals Increased Demand For Young Talent
May
2
Management Trainee Programme Success Signals Increased Demand For Young Talent

Management Trainee Programme Success Signals Increased Demand For Young Talent JacksonGrant hired to expand trainee recruitment programme for global food retailer. In my last blog, I shared a success story about a very big, complex, high-stakes special project. It involved screening several hundred applicants for a prestigious management trainee programme with a well-known global company. The client is a household name in retail food sales and a high-volume F & B wholesale distributor. Our high-profile client was so satisfied with the young talent that JacksonGrant provided in Q1 for the management training programme, that they came back and asked us to continue recruiting for this project all year long. Many of the fresh graduates and young professionals who were accepted as trainees have since signed contracts and are now working as permanent staff.  Searching For Management Trainees In response to our client’s request, we are expanding our recruiting efforts in Q2 and casting a wider net for promising young management candidates for the trainee programme. I have added more staff, and my team at JacksonGrant is now carefully reviewing around 80 CVs per day from hopeful applicants.  We are looking for candidates under 26 years old, with a university education, from anywhere in Thailand. To be considered, candidates must be able to work upcountry and be willing to travel up to six days per week. If you happen to know a recent university graduate or a sharp, ambitious young professional, please share this article with them. The deadline to submit your resume is 31 May. If you, or someone you know is interested, you may submit your CV via email to: management_trainee@jacksongrant.io Candidate Selection Process There are several steps to the trainee selection process. It’s quite rigorous, because our client is looking for candidates who will become long-term employees, on a track to management positions. Applicants must pass an online aptitude test and psychological evaluation before reaching the preliminary interview stage. Candidates who are short-listed by JacksonGrant will then be invited to our client’s HR assessment centre, where their problem-solving, leadership skills, and teamwork abilities will be evaluated in group sessions. Applicants who pass this HR evaluation stage will be granted a final interview with the client’s HR team and senior management.  The Bigger Picture For Recruitment And The Labour Market This trainee programme is emblematic of some wider trends I am observing in HR and recruitment post-Covid. When the pandemic subsided, people returned to their normal lives, and HR departments at big organisations started gearing up to restore their workforce to previous levels. This management trainee search is part of that overall effort. Compared to the pre-covid era, we’ve seen some organisations modify their hiring strategies. More chances are available now for fresh graduates and less experienced talent. This is creating a lot more new opportunities at the entry-level position.  Give The Youth A Chance Many new graduates are proving to large corporations that they are responsible, capable workers. Our client has been very satisfied with the performance of the first wave of management trainees. They are asking for more of the same kind of people, with the anticipation that fresh grads can be developed and groomed to rise through the ranks of the organisation and become a real asset to management.  Positive Feedback Our client has found that Gen Z employees have a unique character that comes from being born and raised in the digital age. They easily adopt and adapt to new technology and are internet-savvy. This new generation of trainees is proving to be assertive, comfortable expressing their opinions, highly energetic, and quick learners. The skill sets and psychological profiles we have identified are a good fit, and our client is hungry for more bright young talent. High-powered energy is required in some fields, such as sales and production creative work. New graduates have the required abundance of energy to learn, and grow. When they are assigned a task, this group of ambitious Gen Z’ers will work tirelessly to demonstrate their ability to complete it. Promising Outlook For More Trainees Many organisations are presently seeking out new graduates for entry-level positions. Our client is looking for a new crop of management trainees to hire each year. Selected candidates will be carefully trained and closely evaluated during their six-month initial trial work period, to see where they will best fit in as full-time staff. Every quarter this year we will conduct another round of trainee searches, evaluations and interviews. By the end of the year, we expect to place around 400 applicants into temporary positions – in finance, operations, supply & logistics, and marketing. About 10 percent of these will be offered contracts for full-time roles, in what we all hope will be the start of a long and prosperous career with our client. There will be a clear path for career advancement for these promising new talents.  Advice For Applicants Don’t be shy to apply for positions that are not necessarily related to your university degree. Employers are more flexible than you may think. Your character is often a more valuable asset than academic credentials. Our client is looking for the following qualities: punctuality and reliability, adaptability, resilience, and a positive attitude. Candidates should do their best to highlight these characteristics when they reach the interview stage. Don’t worry about whether you have experience in a particular field; the company will train you. Remember, we are looking for the right people as much as the right skill set. We will continue this management trainee recruiting programme throughout the year. Two more rounds will follow after the May 31st deadline, so keep coming back to this website for more updates on how and when to apply for the next round.

View
Mind the Gap: How Different Generations Approach Work and Office Culture
Apr
24
Mind the Gap: How Different Generations Approach Work and Office Culture

Attitudes towards work vary widely amongst the age groups.  To ensure a harmonious workplace, HR and corporate leaders need to understand the differences between Gen X, Gen Y, and Gen Z. By Supak ‘June’ Prompila, JacksonGrant Recruitment Consultant I am fortunate to work in an office where three generations – X, Y and Z – work together harmoniously. Different age groups have different approaches to their careers, and different work habits. At JacksonGrant we’ve learned to acknowledge and adapt to these different attitudes, in order to achieve our shared goals and objectives. Navigating the generation gap is not always easy or straightforward. The young people of Generation Z entering the workforce have a very different approach towards work compared to their supervisors. Generally speaking, Gen Z does not share the same work ethic as Generation X. This can be a source of tension between older management and younger staff. It’s increasingly important for different age groups to understand one another and communicate effectively to keep up morale – and prevent any misunderstandings or toxicity in the workplace. Sea Change - Technology and Covid Disruption Gen X-ers were born and raised without high-speed internet, without smartphones and iPads; there was no wifi or instant messaging, and nobody ever got to work from home. There were no crypto-millionaires: ordinary people couldn’t even invest in stocks without paying steep brokerage fees. From a Gen X point of view, the only way to get rich quick is winning the lottery, or breaking the law. The Gen X managers and executives who run regional and global organisations don’t believe in short-cuts: you must work hard for a long time before the company will reward your efforts. In Thailand, it’s the same: Middle-class Gen X-ers had to strive and sacrifice for decades to achieve success. Generation Z doesn’t really believe in that old-fashioned work ethic: they want to work from home, they want flexible hours, and they want immediate rewards. This is a function of rapidly advancing technology, of course, but also two-to-three years of covid disruption: young office workers are accustomed to a very long leash, something that Gen X and Gen Y never had early in their careers. How the Generation Gap Plays Out in the Workplace As a recruiter, I am in constant communication with executive clients and HR colleagues. I regularly follow up with candidates I’ve placed, to see how they are getting on in their new roles. Here are some of the important generational differences I see that can lead to potential conflicts if not properly understood:  ·       Communication styles The young generation is more straightforward, quick to offer constructive criticism, individualistic, with a more casual approach. Gen X values hard work and long hours, a/k/a ‘The Grind’ – they are more skeptical, formal, and uncompromising.  Work ethic and values The young generation has been raised with social media and an emphasis on personal growth, prioritising the self over the collective, and achieving a work-life balance. As a result, they tend to value flexible work arrangements and prioritise a sense of fulfillment in their careers more than traditional values of sacrifice, loyalty, and putting in long hours. They want to work by remote. As much as compensation, Gen Z values diversity, inclusion, and a sense of purpose. They expect quick results, an expectation that is not always realistic. Generation X is far more pragmatic. The older generation sees no substitute for hands-on experience. They value action and achievement more than ideals, place a high importance on learning by doing, trial and error. As we might expect from our elders, they are more patient. They also have a tendency to romanticise hardship. Leadership styles The young generation is extremely open-minded. They resist micromanagement, and resent pressure. Their Generation X supervisors, on the other hand, are intensely focussed on the organisational processes that brought the company success; they prioritise results and the bottom line. Gen Y Can Bridge the Gap Given the wide divergence in values, we can see an inherent conflict between the Gen X management style, and the attitudes of the Gen Z staff that they are supervising. As a Gen-Y recruiter, I am in the middle of both groups, so I try to help Gen X and Gen Z work together more harmoniously, and adapt to changing workplace dynamics. I firmly believe that Gen Y can function as a bridge – because we understand both sides, it is up to us as future managers to help our senior management and junior staff get along. What does this mean for recruitment? Recruiters need to be aware of these generational differences. We need to understand our clients’ company culture intimately and implicitly. Even more importantly, we must ascertain the character of the candidates we are putting forward, to ensure a seamless fit. Red flags may pop up during preliminary interviews. Even if a candidate has the right skill set, it’s a mistake to place an individual with a staunchly Gen-Z personality in a conservative Gen-X environment. Dig deeper: ask job-seekers what is their ideal working culture, what motivates them, what are their life goals? We also must understand our niche industries in great detail. For example, tech employees often thrive in a fast-moving, dynamic culture. The manufacturing sector is more strict, less flexible:  many have six-day work weeks, something that many tech workers won’t accept. What does the widening generation gap mean for employers? Gen X managers and executives need to understand it is much harder in today’s marketplace to find the kind of talent they demand. The upcoming generation often lacks the sort of dedication that companies have come to expect from entry-level staff.  To attract talent with a more old-fashioned work ethic, companies will likely have to pay more, or spend an extended period of time searching for appropriate candidates. Ultimately, in some cases employers may need to accept that the standards they have set for junior staff may be unrealistic, given today’s workforce. Strategic Solutions To attract the best Generation Z talent, businesses should consider how they can soften their workplace, and make policies more flexible. By embracing and accommodating Gen-Z values as much as possible, companies will find it easier to retain younger talent. Here are a few suggestions: ·       Flexibility: Gen Z values flexible work schedules and office hours. Employers should provide hybrid or work-from-home arrangements whenever possible. ·       Technology: Gen Z is a tech-savvy generation that grew up with modern technology. Employers should provide them with the most advanced technology to work with, such as the latest computers, software, and communication tools. ·       Diversity and Inclusion: DEI is extremely important to young people. Organisations should strive to create an inclusive workplace where employees of different backgrounds and cultures feel valued and respected, with equal opportunities for promotion.  ·       Continuous Learning: Gen Z values training and development opportunities. Employers should provide regular training programmes, workshops, and mentorship to help the next generation improve their skills and education. Advice for Generation Z Job-seekers also need to compromise if they want to achieve success. Gen Z are mostly entry-level and junior staff; they need to understand that they don’t run the world – not yet, anyway. Their opinions about work-life balance and compensation may have merit, but they are untested at the organisational level. Entry-level workers must accept that they will need to work harder: unless your family owns the company, the only way to succeed in the corporate world as junior staff is to put in more effort than your colleagues. There simply aren’t as many shortcuts in the corporate world as there are in social media entrepreneurship, for example. Some hard truths about Gen Z, from an elder’s perspective: ·       Gen Z is in too much of a hurry. They are impatient for change, but organisational changes take time, especially in big organisations. Young professionals need to appreciate that institutional change doesn’t come in the blink of an eye, despite how quickly technology is changing the world. ·       First prove that your new way of working is faster, better and more sustainable. Only then will Gen X bosses consider new ideas. ·       Young Gen Z workers often think they deserve a seat at the table, and the right to influence company policy. But they haven’t proven themselves yet. It is unrealistic to expect big rewards so early in your career. Meeting in the Middle Misunderstandings and disagreements between Gen X and Gen Z are to be expected in the workplace, just as in life. Gen Z needs to appreciate that the world is slowly adjusting to their preferred way of doing things, but a quick revolution is not going to happen. To convince Gen X of your talents, you need to adopt a more measured approach. Gen X and Y need to be open-minded about what Gen Z has to offer. Give junior staff an opportunity to speak their mind and make suggestions about adapting to new technology. At the same time, help them to cultivate the self-discipline required to implement the changes they desire. Gen Z needs help to develop their time management and organisational skills. Moving Forward  The two-to-three-year covid lockdown put Gen Z in a bubble that they haven’t completely emerged from. They have not been fully socialised and initiated into the corporate world as previous waves of graduates have. Covid did not create a ‘new normal’. It was a temporary pause. New up-and-coming talent has tremendous potential, and lots to offer; but they have not learned yet how to apply their skills within traditional structures. For this they need Gen X and Gen Y’s guidance. Both sides of the age divide can foster a more productive and happier workplace if they understand and appreciate the ‘other’. This can be achieved by showing mutual respect for each group’s contributions, strengths, and accomplishments. Gen Z and Gen X should be open to change and embrace new technologies and work methods. Gen X can share their knowledge and experience with Gen Z, while Gen Z can share their knowledge of modern technology and trends. Knowledge-sharing can create a more productive and innovative workplace. If your company is having difficulty sourcing the right young talent to fits your office culture, I can help. Please reach out to me here.     

View
What should you expect from a Recruiter?  And what should a Recruiter expect from you?
Mar
27
What should you expect from a Recruiter? And what should a Recruiter expect from you?

I have made my career in recruitment and it makes me very happy to see that the days of mass transactional recruitment appear to be almost over. We are returning to an environment where a proper consultative approach and genuine industry expertise are appreciated by both companies and candidates. So, as a potential candidate, what are the things you should look for from a recruiter? Your recruiter should be someone you can trust to genuinely help you make a considered and massively important decision – developing your career. Your recruiter should have a decent understanding of your industry sector and/or job function and they should have a profile that ensures they “know the market.” It is much more common for a recruiter to contact you with a specific opportunity in mind; it’s not so common for them to reach out just to get acquainted. I recommend establishing a relationship with one or two recruiters whom you value and trust. A trusted recruiter can provide invaluable advice on how to improve your current job situation – which often is the right step for your career a lot of the time. “I think you should stay in your current job” is not something we hear often enough from recruiters. Your recruiter should evaluate your CV and “matchability” to a specific position. But they should also take the time to explore your feelings, career goals, and outlook in your life as a whole. If you do not trust your recruiter to “add value” in this way, then you should not work with them. When your recruiter discusses an opportunity with you, they should demonstrate that they know the company that they are representing very well. It is their client, after all: they should know the key people involved in the hiring process, know how the hiring process will proceed, and understand the company environment and culture. The recruiter should provide guidance and advice to the point where you can confidently and comfortably make an informed decision on whether to take advantage of a new opportunity. Your recruiter should stick with you closely through the process of resignation, notice period, and onboarding in a new role. These times are really crucial to create a solid foundation for success in a new environment. Ideally, you should like your recruiter. You should feel that there is genuine empathy during meetings and phone conversations; communication always should be clear and constructive. What do recruiters expect from you in return? This is a very simple answer: openness and honesty. Once you have determined that you are interested to discuss new opportunities or your career in general with a recruiter, you should openly share your thoughts and feelings. Speak candidly about your previous career decisions and how things are going in your current job. You should share information about your hobbies & interests, and let your recruiter know what’s going on in your life: the best career decisions always are made when your personal feelings and long term goals are taken into account. Please feel free to get in touch with us at JacksonGrant if you want to discuss how to improve your current job situation, or seek a new opportunity.

View
Cornerstone Thailand : Thailand National Outlook 2023
Mar
20
Cornerstone Thailand : Thailand National Outlook 2023

As a representative of Cornerstone International Office in Thailand, our Managing Director Richard Jackson has written "Thailand: National Outlook 2023", which sheds light on the country's economic recovery from the pandemic. THAILAND: NATIONAL OUTLOOK 2023  Thailand’s economy is coming back after the covid pandemic. Analysts project the economy will return to pre-covid levels by the end of 2023. A strong tourism recovery is underway, and there has already been a steady increase in infrastructure investment. The global economic headwinds we are currently experiencing will impact Thailand’s exports: 2023 will be a difficult year for the Supply Chain and Logistics sector. Observer remain optimistic that Thailand will continue to attract foreign investment because it is a global hub for key industries that supply important global supply chains. MACROECONOMIC INDICATORS We are seeing a steady recovery, but it is uneven. Thailand’s GDP growth is projected to be 3.5-3.8 percent this year. This is a continuation of a recovery that saw GDP grow by 1.4 percent and 3.2 percent in 2021 and 2022, respectively. The country’s GDP contracted by more than 6 percent in 2020. Exports make up roughly 60 percent of Thailand’s GDP, but global economic jitters are already impacting export volumes. Covid actually boosted to the Logistics industry, but now that boost is over and affecting shipping prices. This could be the start of a rough time for logistics companies, as export volumes are expected to drop 10-15%. From November to December 2022, we saw the value of exports from Thailand reduced, from 22.4 to 21.7 billion USD.  Tourism made up 19 percent of Thailand’s pre-covid GDP; now it is hovering around 10 percent. Last year, Thailand welcomed over 10 million foreign tourists; twice as many are expected in 2023. However, a complete recovery of the tourism sector is dependent on a continued increase of Chinese arrivals. The agriculture sector is picking up:  in 2022, agricultural trade increased by 20 percent, making Thailand the 13th-largest exporter of agricultural products in the world. Thailand is still struggling with inflation, which peaked at 8 percent last year; it’s now around 5 percent. The problem is not merely the rate of inflation: the prices of daily staples like cooking oil, rice, eggs, & pork means real hardship for the working class. Add rising oil prices to the mix, and inflation could add to political problems, and present a barrier to full economic recovery. ALL EYES ARE ON CHINA Thailand’s fortunes depend in large part on what happens in China this year. Political and economic developments in China will affect Chinese tourism and consumer demand for Thai exports. There are three main ways that the Thai economy  benefits from dynamics in the Chinese economy: tourism, factory relocation, and the post-covid increase in China’s domestic consumer spending. Consumer Electronics, Electric Vehicles (EVs), Biotech, and Aerospace are the main industries benefitting from the relocation of Chinese factories. Global supply chains that are overdependent on products made in a single country have proven to be extremely vulnerable. Multinational manufacturers – and Chinese firms themselves – have expanded, or are planning to establish new production and export hubs in Southeast Asia. Thailand is a beneficiary of this trend, especially the electronics and automotive industries. Since 2018, Thailand has been the second-most popular destination for factory relocations from China to Southeast Asia, next to Vietnam. The government is actively promoting the kingdom as a modern centre of manufacturing: for auto & EV production, advanced electronics, smart agriculture & food production, renewable energies, healthcare, defence and robotics. Over 92 percent of Sony’s camera production has been relocated from China to Thailand. From now on, all Sony cameras sold in the US, Japan and Europe will be manufactured in Thailand. Meanwhile, tourism officials anticipate 25 million foreign arrivals in 2023, a figure that has been revised upward due to the unexpectedly fast pace of economic recovery in China. The lifting of covid restrictions is also ramping up Chinese demand for imported products, something that may buoy Thai export volumes somewhat. SECTORS TO WATCH: EV MANUFACTURING Thailand is making great strides in the EV market. Examples of this development include FoxConn’s JV with the national oil company; Toyota’s announcement of a partnership with CP, one of Thailand’s most influential corporate entities. Other Major Japanese automakers are setting up EV manufacturing bases here; Elon Musk’s Tesla is operating in Thailand as well. The government is pushing for EVs to constitute 50 percent of domestically manufactured vehicles by 2030. To make EVs more accessible, 24 billion baht (approximately 717 million USD) in subsidies has been earmarked to support EV battery cell production. The current administration also intends to cut excise taxes for battery manufacturers to 1 percent. PTT, the state-run oil company is setting up an EV charging network infrastructure, with 7,000 outlets planned by 2030. Today there are only 139 charging stations nationwide. PTT inked a JV agreement with Taiwan’s Hon Hai Technology Group earlier this year to manufacture battery-powered electric vehicles (BEVs) in Chonburi. Chinese firms are also keen to manufacture batteries and EVs in Thailand. Automotive companies such as GWM, MG, BYD and DFSK are selling EVs at a lower price point to try and increase market share. Chinese automakers’ brand reputation has a long way to go, but Chinese firms have signalled they are ready to invest significantly in Thailand operations. Thai firms are expanding EV operations abroad.  The CEO of Energy Absolute, Somphote Ahunai, met with Malaysian premier Anwar Ibrahim in January. The company has a JV plan in motion to produce and distribute electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries, and charging platforms in Malaysia. It must be noted that the global semiconductor shortage will likely continue for some time, and could be a short-term obstacle to Thailand's ambitious EV plans. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY & EVOLUTION The tech sector is doing well, but elevated interest rates are reducing the availability of private equity capital that fuelled much of the recent rapid tech growth. Google, Amazon, and Facebook parent company Meta are cutting headcounts. Digital retailers Lazada and Shoppee are following suit, cutting thousands of jobs in Thailand. I predict the tech slowdown will impact recruiting for other industries. There may be a reverse migration of talent away from the tech sector, as tech professionals look for more stable, predictable industries in need of their expertise in digital marketing and analysis. Thailand’s position as a primary technology and innovation hub in Southeast Asia is bound to continue,  despite this temporary slowdown in global tech. New long-term residency visas are being offered to foreigners with certain advanced technological skills. DEI & ESG Sustainability, gender equity, and DE&I has become even more important to multinational actors, and I think this trend will accelerate.  Thailand is at the forefront of developing Southeast Asia’s Green Economy, especially with their EV policy. Most C-suite executives are now prioritising ESG and DEI, which are now an essential element of corporate policy. Efforts to end LGBTQ+ discrimination in the workplace is a big issue in the West. Thailand’s culture is more accepting of gay and transgender people, and they are far less likely to experience discrimination in the workplace. Gender equity in recruitment is making progress in Thailand, as companies make a concerted push to recruit more females proactively for senior leadership roles. TRENDS & POLITICAL DEVELOPMENTS With international travel returning after covid, the MRO and aerospace industry is primed for growth in the region, especially Thailand. The U Tapao military base near Pattaya has been repurposed as an MRO hub with passenger terminals. Malaysia’s workforce is less skilled, and Singapore is more expensive so I expect Thailand will experience significant growth in the MRO industry, and as a logistics and tourist travel hub. Soon voters will go to the polls to elect the next Thai prime minister. Investors are hopeful that election results will provide greater clarity and stability, but it’s still unclear who will emerge the victor. No matter who wins the election, it’s safe to say that Thailand will remain receptive to business. The economy in Thailand has historically been resilient, regardless of domestic politics. WHAT THIS ALL MEANS FOR RECRUITMENT Current market conditions call for a renewed focus amongst executive recruiters on their clients’ organisational preparedness. Top leaders should cultivate the acuity needed for rapid adaptation in the event of market disruptions. Risk may need to be taken, ina proactive, calculated fashion, and innovation must be embraced. During the past two years, 52 percent of our executive placements have been female. We are responding to the increasing demand for DE&I in corporate leadership, and this trend will continue in 2023. I am seeing a movement towards skills-based assessment in 2023, another key recruitment trend. In response to rapid technology advancement, companies are transforming – this creates the need for new positions at every level.  There is a greater need for Data Scientists, Directors of DE&I, and Sustainability Managers, for example. HR & C-Suite leaders need to re-examine the types of talent profiles required for these new roles, and adapt their hiring policies accordingly. Beside Thailand insight here, you can discover more 36 countries outlook here. For expert executive recruitment advice, we welcome you to contact JacksonGrant to learn more about how to prepare your leadership for future challenges and success. Our consultants are ready and able to help.

View
What is it like working as a Recruitment Consultant in Thailand
Mar
8
What is it like working as a Recruitment Consultant in Thailand

Recruitment is an essential aspect of any business, and it is no different in Thailand. As a country with a growing economy and a diverse range of industries, there is a constant need for skilled and talented individuals in various fields. Working in recruitment in Thailand can be a rewarding and challenging experience, and in this article, we will explore what it is like to work in this field. First and foremost, recruitment in Thailand is a people-focused industry. This means that as a recruiter, your primary responsibility is to connect employers with the right candidates for their vacancies. This involves sourcing potential candidates, reviewing resumes and applications, conducting interviews, and making hiring recommendations to your clients. One of the unique challenges of working in recruitment in Thailand is the diverse cultural and linguistic landscape. Thailand is a country with a rich and complex culture, and this is reflected in its people. As a recruiter, you must be aware of cultural differences and understand how they can impact the recruitment process. It is also essential to be able to communicate effectively in both English and Thai, as these are the two primary languages used in business settings. Another challenge that recruiters in Thailand face is the competitive nature of the job market. With a growing economy and a high demand for skilled workers, there is often a shortage of qualified candidates in certain industries. This means that recruiters must work harder to find and attract top talent. Additionally, with so many recruitment agencies operating in the country, competition for clients can be fierce. Despite the challenges, working in recruitment in Thailand can be a highly rewarding career. The industry is constantly evolving, and there are always new opportunities to learn and grow. Recruiters play a vital role in helping companies find the right people to drive their success, and this can be a fulfilling experience. Furthermore, Thailand is a beautiful and vibrant country with a rich culture and friendly people. As a recruiter, you will have the opportunity to work with people from all walks of life and experience different industries and job roles. This can be an enriching and educational experience that can broaden your horizons and provide you with valuable insights into the Thai business landscape. In conclusion, working in recruitment in Thailand can be both challenging and rewarding. Recruiters must be able to navigate a diverse cultural and linguistic landscape and work hard to find top talent in a competitive job market. However, the industry offers opportunities for growth and development and the chance to make a real difference in the lives of both employers and candidates. If you are considering a career in recruitment in Thailand, it can be a fulfilling and exciting career path. If you are interested in a career in recruitment in Thailand please reach out to our Director of Recruitment Operations at Alexander@jacksongrant.io

View
JacksonGrant Supports Clients’ Sustainability Goals
Feb
21
JacksonGrant Supports Clients’ Sustainability Goals

Isawan Kaeochotchuangkul is a rising star in the Sustainability sector: she was recently appointed Global Head of Sustainability at Rhenus A & O. Sustainability is a core value of JacksonGrant, and we welcome the chance to work with our clients on strengthening their Sustainability credentials.  Khun Isawan is an excellent role model for aspiring young female Thai professionals, especially those who are interested in pursuing a career in logistics; also for any aspiring manager who is passionate about Sustainability.  Isawan holds a Masters in Transport & Logistics from Technical University of Munich, where she also studied Marketing and Business Management. She graduated with honours from Thammasat University’s Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology. Nick Padovan, head of JacksonGrant’s Supply Chain & Logistics team, has worked closely with Isawan on a number of projects. We hope you will enjoy this conversation between Nick and Khun Isawan about how her career path led to a high-profile global role in the Sustainability field. Nick: Can you tell us about your career path? How did it start?  Isawan: In 2015, I joined Rhenus as an Asia Pacific management trainee. Rhenus provides a unique opportunity for recent graduates to move between countries every six months and explore multiple departments. This gave me the opportunity to strengthen my skills from various points of view while getting involved in international strategies and several projects from different angle; Product, IT, HR, Commercial, as well as general Management. Over the years, I've come to realise that being able to see the big picture is something that really intrigues me. Rather than simply connecting ideas and getting things done, it's a process of gathering the pieces together to successfully reach a common goal.  Nick: How did you transition into a Sustainability role?  Isawan: Growing up in an area where water flows freely and air quality is ideal, I grew to truly appreciate direct access to it. However, through my travels and a few relocations to different countries, I have seen how fragile these necessities are in some parts of the world; how people who are less fortunate often must simply accept whatever is available to them. This can have huge impacts on their lives, as certain things may be impossible for them to do or acquire because of the environment and circumstances beyond their control. For this reason, I believe that clean air and water should be a fundamental right for all people, regardless of their place of residence. When the global discussion about Sustainability at Rhenus was underway and a position presented itself to be a part of that effort, I jumped right in. This industry contributes 20 percent of world-wide carbon emissions, so I saw this as a great chance to make a meaningful contribution. Nick: As Director of Sustainability, what do you hope to accomplish? Can you elaborate on Rhenus’ initiatives and the importance of sustainability in the logistics sector? Isawan:  My goal is to ensure the organisation is working together towards a clear, achievable strategy for reaching sustainability. It is important for organisations to have a clear strategic direction that is communicated and adopted by every division and all employees. This intent should be communicated and cascaded down to each Rhenus employee so that everyone has a shared understanding of our goals and objectives, as well as how their job contributes to achieving them. With this understanding in place, we can work together towards a common goal – sustainability. At Rhenus Air & Ocean division, We separated our initiatives into three key areas:  Transport Solutions: We highly focus on providing emissions visibility on the shipment level to our customers before providing options to make their supply chain more sustainable, cleaner, or carbon neutral. We are also focused on building long-term relationships with partners who have the same values as ours. Environment: We care deeply about managing our emissions scopes 1 & 2, from our assets and energy use to the materials we acquire for operations and our level of internal decision-making. Moreover, we strive for a positive impact in our scope 3 activities derived from assets outside of our ownership or control. We track all the data and work on a roadmap for continuous improvement to ensure that we remain accountable to society. People: We place importance on the good health and well-being goals as well as gender equality from the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. We develop initiatives in our training that are implemented within our organisation and bring visibility of these decisions to key decision-makers. NICK: What makes Rhenus different from its other competitors in terms of its Sustainability drive? Isawan: We are in a period of unprecedented change, as we transition from a carbon-emitting economy to one built around sustainable energy. As we attempt to meet this challenge, I strongly believe that logistics providers should be able to provide accurate, trustworthy figures regarding their emissions to design an effective strategy that can achieve carbon neutrality.  At Rhenus, we understand the importance of sustainability, how it is crucial to our customers, and most importantly, to us all as global citizens. We've collected data from all aspects of our operations to create a comprehensive picture and solid plan to drive our sustainability agenda. We share this information with our key stakeholders and clients to help them make informed decisions that reduce emissions and maximise their savings. Rhenus strives to make a long-lasting and positive impact on sustainability. We aim to deliver value to our customers that will help them revolutionise their supply chain.  Nick: Do you have any advice for fresh graduates and young professionals pursuing a career in sustainability logistics?  Isawan: Sustainability is a (very) broad topic, and in my opinion there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach. Therefore, don’t stop learning, be creative, and keep challenging the status quo!

View
4 Ways to make sure you get the right job for you
Feb
17
4 Ways to make sure you get the right job for you

Congratulations, you’ve decided that now is the time to find a new job in Thailand! If you’ve begun to look for a new role, you’ll know that there are thousands of jobs posted every day. But knowing which new job is right for you can be a challenge. If you don’t try to narrow down your options you can spend too much time applying for jobs that don’t offer you the right career progression, learning development, salary or benefits. And we know that can be time consuming and demoralising! But with a little thought at the beginning of your job search you can make sure that you are applying for jobs that use your skills and meet your needs. How to know if a new job is right for you Before you begin your job search it’s helpful to sit down and write out a list of things you need from a role, and things you would like from a role. Ask yourself the following questions: What do you need from a new role in this moment? This can be things like pay, working hours and healthcare benefits. But also, the chance to work in a multinational environment, opportunities to work overseas or to flex your language skills by working at a predominantly English-speaking company. Anything that you want a job to provide you right now. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? How about the next ten? What are you aiming for in terms of your short and long-term career progression? Do you want to be a senior executive, are you looking to switch fields, work abroad or even start your own business. What skills and experience will you need to achieve those milestones? To reach those ambitions you’ll need specific technical skills, soft skills, and experience in other roles. Any job you are looking for should provide you opportunities to develop those. How you answer those questions will help you determine the things you require from a job role such as: Opportunities for growth The chance to develop new skills Clear career progression Good work-life balance  Competitive pay and benefits Once you know clearly what you want from a role it becomes much easier to know if a role is right for you by looking at the job description. The next step is to build useful strategies into your job search to help you get the job offer you want. 4 strategies to help you find a job that supports your goals These four steps will provide you a framework for your job search and will help you secure your dream job offer: 1. Decide what you want from your next role By asking yourself the questions above you can determine what you need from a role right now and what will be useful to help you meet your long and short-term goals.  2. Review the top employers in your area Put together a list of top employers in your area and the roles they offer. Use job descriptions to note down the skills that are most in-demand. This will help you establish a benchmark of what employers in Thailand are offering and what skills and experience they are looking for in return. It will help you focus on areas you need to upskill. 3. Update your CV and professional channels  The jobs market in Thailand is changing and employers are now increasingly looking for business English and digital skills in the technical and engineering industries. If you don’t have the skills employers are looking for in your dream role, now is a good time to take an extra class or online qualification. Make sure your CV is up to date. It can also be good practice to tweak your CV for each role based on key words and skills you can find in the job description. You should also take some time to update your professional social channels, such as LinkedIn. Make sure you have a professional photo and that you have included your latest jobs roles, skills, and experience. You want to ensure you are making the best first impression to potential employers or even recruiters! 4. Get in touch with a specialist recruiter like JacksonGrant! A specialist recruiter, such as JacksonGrant, can be an excellent way to be sure you are applying for the roles that fit your ambitions and job requirements. Our consultants will always work with your short, medium, and long-term employment objectives in mind. That way you always get jobs that match your skills and experience, making for a smoother job search and better results. Our support doesn’t end when you find your perfect role. We continue to work with you throughout the different stages of your career, providing objective and impartial career advice and feedback allowing you to grow and develop as a professional. Find your dream role today! At JacksonGrant we put our candidates first. We only send you relevant roles that match your interests, skills, experience, and industry knowledge. Cut down your job search time and connect with technical employers across Thailand with the opportunities to help you grow and develop professionally. Check out our current vacancies or submit your CV directly.

View
How I Got Started in Recruitment: By Leaving My Comfort Zone Behind
Feb
13
How I Got Started in Recruitment: By Leaving My Comfort Zone Behind

My journey to become a successful recruiter with JacksonGrant has helped my personal growth and development. Embrace the Potential for ChangeA couple of years ago, I was working as an investment consultant. It really wasn’t my thing. It was a high-pressure environment, intensely competitive and cutthroat. Even worse, it was boring. I was unfulfilled; I felt like my career was stalling.I wanted to find a new job. But first I had to open my mind to the possibilities.I have a close friend who has experience in the recruitment business. She knows my skill set and personality, and suggested I might be good at recruiting. I have experience in sales, so it seemed a good fit. JacksonGrant Recognised My TalentI began doing some research online, looking at all the recruitment agencies operating in Bangkok, big and small. I reached out to all of them via email, and applied for every headhunting vacancy I could find on the job boards. As I learned a bit about the business, I started to feel that a big international agency might not take the time to really train and teach me; it takes time to become a good recruiter. JacksonGrant is the only agency that called me back. They saw my potential and wanted to train me from scratch, even though I didn’t have any recruitment experience. JacksonGrant gave me the opportunity to really learn and build a new career. Exceeding ExpectationsI had no idea what it would be like to work in recruitment. I didn’t know anything about the job, I only know it was possible to make good money as a recruiter. I wasn’t very enthusiastic at first, but neither did I have any preconceptions – it’s important to start a new job with an open mind. When I started to actually do the work, I found it really interesting. A new recruiter needs to do a lot of research to understand our clients, to learn about the different jobs and skill sets required. Most of all I found it fascinating to learn about the various industries. Recruiters have a unique perspective on the economy. All of the research we do to keep track of the job market provides an overview of how the economy is shifting, and where multinational investment is being directed. As a recruiter, especially a junior recruiter, I have to be ahead of the curve.For example, if I am working with clients in the Logistics industry, I need to compile comprehensive lists of companies operating in the region. I need to find out what they are good at – and where they are perhaps struggling. I look into market share, emerging trends, all the data I can find to understand the big picture. I found I have an aptitude for research and analysis. It has given me an inside view on the industry landscape in Thailand and beyond, and that helps me be a good recruiter.I also enjoy the work environment at JacksonGrant. It’s more interesting than my old finance job, and the office is more close-knit. Headhunting can be frantic and a bit of a mess sometimes, but I am surrounded by friendly human beings who lift my spirits and share a common goal.MentorshipJacksonGrant has really given me the chance to learn that I was looking for. Alex Grant has been a great mentor. He allows me to make my own mistakes and learn from them. He sees the potential in me and invests time and effort in my career development. We have honest conversations about what I want to learn and achieve. The process involves a lot of self-reflection. Together, we identify my weaknesses and the areas where I want to improve. I am encouraged to attend training sessions and seminars. We Need to be ResilientAs a recruiter, you are in the middle – between the client and the candidate. Your stakeholders are human beings. Unlike finance, there are no fixed variables in the equation. The variables in headhunting are always changing and moving.I love the personal touch involved with recruitment, but that is also the most difficult part: recruiters need to balance everyone’s needs and desires. When your stakeholders are human beings, you have to accept that you do not have control in the same way you do with financial investments. It is frustrating when I think I’ve made a deal that will satisfy all stakeholders, but at the last minute a candidate changes their mind about making a move. People change their minds, and there are a lot of factors in their decision-making, things happening in their personal lives, that you just can’t control. At moments like this you need to be more resilient and accept that this is a very personal business. Like surfing, sometimes you must go with the flow. Sometimes you will crash out. It happens to the best recruiters. We need to accept that we can’t control the outcome, and move forward despite any setbacks. Resilience is a key aspect of successful recruiting.Building ConfidenceAfter the first four or five months, I almost gave up. I felt really desperate. I had made a few placements, but I didn’t think my performance was good enough. I felt like I was failing. I told the management team that I may not be cut out for this. Thankfully my bosses listened to my concerns, and moved me to the Supply Chain and Logistics division. Then something clicked. After changing specialisations, I started to be more successful. I got to know the market and my clients better; I became more familiar with the candidates; my network reached a tipping point and started to expand. “Maybe I can do this,” I thought. I began making more placements, and started to feel proud of myself. Before I had no confidence. But now I was working in an industry that felt like the right fit for me.This year I am working with Manufacturing and Engineering sectors, and increasing my knowledge about more industries in Thailand. Closing a Big DealLast year, I started to achieve my goal of closing senior roles. My biggest placement was the head of new product development for a luxury consumer electronics company. Our client has a big production hub in Thailand. The company was setting up a new team dedicated to expanding operations, and created a high-profile new position to lead this team. JacksonGrant got the recruitment contract to fill this role. I worked hard on it, and closed the deal just before the end of 2022. It was a tough position to fill, and strategically very important for a blue-chip company. It is the most senior position I have hired so far, and I will always remember that feeling.Keep an Open MindI didn’t expect recruiting to be interesting. I just knew it could be profitable. But now that I’m a year-and-a-half into the job, I really enjoy it. Now I’m in it for the long haul.I am working very hard, but I feel energised and refreshed. It took five or six months to adapt and get up-to-speed.When I completed my first year at JacksonGrant, I was approached by a big global recruitment firm. But I’m not interested to leave JacksonGrant for a giant international agency. I learned so much in my first 18 months about recruiting, manufacturing, engineering, supply chain and logistics. I feel there’s so much more to learn here. I like working at a smaller firm.I want to tell everyone who reads my blog that it is so important to keep an open mind and try new things. When I started this job, I had no idea what recruitment was about.I was ready to jump out of my comfort zone. That’s when you will see the world differently. You will see what you are really capable of, if you go out into the world and see for yourself how many things you can learn. But you must be open-minded to learn new things. When you see the world in a bigger perspective, you will change your attitude and your mindset about what you can do and achieve.If you’re looking to hire personnel, or you are a candidate ready to seek new opportunities, I’d like to hear from you. Please visit my LinkedIn profile and send me a message for more details.

View
JacksonGrant Special Projects: Management Trainee Recruitment
Feb
6
JacksonGrant Special Projects: Management Trainee Recruitment

When clients are faced with a unique HR challenge that requires special expertise, it’s my job to find a solution.Recently, one of our most important clients needed help finding talented young professionals for their management trainee programme. It was a big assignment, and a difficult one: we were asked to find 100 promising trainees with management potential – and we had only two months to do it.A High-Priority Project, for a High-Profile ClientThe client is a global food retailer and wholesale F&B distributor, a household brand recognised around the world. JacksonGrant enjoys a very close and trusted relationship with this client. We have an exclusive agreement to do all their recruiting in Thailand. Because this is such a valuable client, I was feeling the pressure to succeed!First Step: Build A Talent PoolThe client wanted management trainee candidates under 26 years old, with a university education. They could be based anywhere in Thailand. To be considered, candidates must be able to work upcountry and be willing to travel up to six days per week. I assigned five junior JacksonGrant recruiters to work on this project as a team. We started our search by looking for recent graduates with no more than four years of experience. We had to identify candidates with clear management potential. Casting a Wide Net My team started gathering resumes for the talent pool with an intensive social media search, using apps like LinkedIn, JobsDB, JobtopGun, and JobThai. We posted advertisements, and pulled resumes from electronic databases. Soon we had a pile of CVs from 2,000 candidates. To narrow it down, we spoke personally to everyone on the list. Each recruiter on my team made 50 phone calls per day for an entire week. After these preliminary interviews, 1,200 candidates made it through to the testing phase of the selection process. Testing & EvaluationBefore management trainee candidates could be interviewed by the client, they must first pass an online aptitude test and a psychological profile evaluation. We needed to find trainees who met the client’s criteria for technical knowledge and education. Successful candidates also needed to fit a certain psychological profile, because the trainees would be groomed for management positions in the future. Our client needed us to identify young people who would be likely to stay with the company for the long-term, to make it worth the significant investment in their training and development. Only 30 percent of the 1,200 candidates passed the aptitude test and psychological evaluation. Around 400 trainee candidates made it though to the client interview stage of the process.InterviewsNow we had a short list of 400 candidates who met the client’s management training programme criteria. These short-listed candidates were invited to the client’s HR assessment centre. They spent a day participating in group sessions and work project simulations, to evaluate their problem-solving abilities and leadership potential, and observe how they work as a team.The trainee candidates who passed the client’s HR assessment made it to the final cut: the client interview. The client’s HR team and senior management conducted final interviews to identify the best leaders, who also possess entrepreneurship qualities, and the right attitude to fit in with the company’s culture. The final decisions were made by senior management. Mission AccomplishedI was really proud to lead my team through this project to a successful conclusion. It was a big challenge, with high stakes. We spent two months working very closely together on this project; my team is more close-knit and efficient now. It was great experience for my junior recruiters.Evaluating who will be a prospective long-term employee, with management potential is rigorous and time-consuming. The selection process was very tough, and extremely thorough. Only the most dedicated, patient, determined candidates made it to the final cut. It was not easy to find candidates who could pass the initial screening, so we had to continually widen the scope of our search.It is super-challenging to find the right psychological profile for a management trainee; because in today’s workplace, young people are not necessarily looking to stay at the same job for five-to-ten years, especially early in their careers. That was probably the most difficult part of this recruitment project.The successful candidates are now working with the company, training for a six-month trial period. If they are successful, they will be offered a full-time contract of employment. The management trainees start from zero, and work their way up, getting to know all the different roles that they will one day oversee as managers and executives.Job SatisfactionOur big client is happy with their trainees. We’ve received feedback that our candidates were of high quality, and they are doing well in their probationary period of training. They plan to continue this programme every year, with management trainees needed for logistics, engineering, and supply chain divisions. In fact, we’re already identifying candidates for the next management trainee programme. If you, or someone you know is interested, you may apply here or Management_trainee@jacksongrant.io Does your company have a recruitment challenge that is too big for your internal HR department to handle on their own? Let’s talk about how outsourcing your recruitment needs to JacksonGrant can be a win-win for everyone involved. Please feel free to me here or email me at sureeporn@jacksongrant.io

View
How to recruit your leaders with ED&I in mind in engineering, manufacturing and supply chain
Jan
30
How to recruit your leaders with ED&I in mind in engineering, manufacturing and supply chain

Equality, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) in business is a hot topic around the world. There are many advantages for your business in having a more diverse and inclusive workforce. Diverse businesses are more productive, more innovative, and ultimately more profitable. Being more inclusive can also help you attract and retain employees with sought-after skills and experience. But some industries are less diverse than others and some groups, particularly women, face difficulties in reaching senior leadership positions because of this in Thailand. There is good news! Thailand currently ranks 79th out of 146 countries in the World Economic Forum’s 2022 Gender Gap Report. In 2020 the WEF estimated that by the end of the year women would make up roughly 35% of top management positions in firms and 16% of representatives in parliament. Those figures have been supported by the fact that Thailand is now one of ten countries in East Asia and the Pacific which have seen an increase in the share of women in senior positions such as legislators, officials, and managers. Our own efforts have contributed significantly to this development as 52% of our placed candidates in 2022 were female.   4 leadership hiring techniques to promote diversity when hiring in Thailand Developing strategies to improve equality, inclusion, and diversity in the ways we hire often leads to an increase in the numbers of diverse entry-level candidates. However, promoting diversity in leadership requires a unique approach. If we want to create equal-opportunity recruitment strategies for senior leadership positions, we need to create a workplace where highly-qualified candidates from diverse backgrounds want to develop and grow their careers. Here are four leadership hiring techniques you can employ: 1. Make ED&I a company priority Placing ED&I strategies and initiatives at the core of your company values and mission is attractive to high-quality leadership candidates. A survey by the Boston Consulting Group found that South East Asian employees saw a correlation between diversity and competitiveness yet only 58% of those surveyed said that their employers had established formal diversity and inclusion programmes compared with 96% globally.  Committing to making ED&I a priority, rewarding work on diversity initiatives, and communicating your commitment in your employer branding can position you as an employer that values inclusion. 2. Encourage internal talent When a leadership position becomes available in an organisation the default choice can often be to hire an external candidate. However, that can lead to talented people within your company being overlooked for promotion despite possessing the skills and experience you need.  Looking internally and even considering moving personnel horizontally from other teams and departments can be a cost-effective and efficient way to encourage diverse viewpoints and champion diverse talent. Putting in place mentorship programmes and offering leadership training to high-potential employees can help you nurture internal talent. 3. Improve diversity in mid-level roles To ensure you have enough internal candidates available for leadership positions, it’s important to improve diversity when hiring lower down the ladder, particularly in mid-level roles. Unconscious bias, where hiring managers and interviewers form opinions about candidates based on their gender, ethnicity or age, can make the process unfair and result in your business missing out on talented individuals.  Standardising your recruitment process for all roles, working to eliminate unconscious bias when hiring and considering accessibility and flexibility in your hiring process can help you attract diverse talent. Explore new talent pools and consider ways you can bring talent into the sector. For example, re-entry programmes can help women return to the workforce following maternity leave.  Follow this diversity hiring checklist: Remove biased language from job descriptions Rethink what your ideal candidate looks like Use blind recruitment methods Seek out diverse candidates and talent pools Use your employee networks for referrals Offer internships or mentorships to diverse groups Use your employer brand to show the diversity of your organisation 4. Develop a culture of inclusion  A culture of inclusion goes a long way to increasing retention and, most importantly, encouraging diverse candidates to develop their career with you long enough to grow into leadership roles. 57% of employees would consider leaving their current employer to join a more inclusive organisation. Employee Resource Groups, mentorship schemes, re-entry programmes and other support systems can help you build inclusivity into the culture of your organisation. It can be important here to get feedback from your employees and respond to that feedback to improve inclusion efforts. Close the gender gap in manufacturing and supply chain leadership with JacksonGrant If you are looking for help in promoting female leadership and in attracting and retaining diverse candidates, we can help. We specialise in finding exceptional talent for the manufacturing, engineering, and supply chain industries in Thailand and have the reach and network to source the right diversity of qualified candidates for your organisation. Set up a free consultation with one of our consultants or submit a vacancy today.

View
New Year Reflections on the Recruitment Industry: How Much Has Really Changed?
Jan
30
New Year Reflections on the Recruitment Industry: How Much Has Really Changed?

At the beginning of a new year, we have a natural tendency to reflect on where we’ve been, where we’re at, and where we’re going.30 Years in the Recruiting BusinessI’ve been in the recruitment business for 30 years now; I started out in 1992.My first recruiting job was in the UK. I was assigned to work the IT sector. It was a run-of-the-mill agency that focused on permanent job recruitment. I went in with absolutely no experience. Those were the days before email, before the internet, when recruitment was done entirely over the phone and in-person. every person for themselvesIt was an aggressive, sales-driven office culture. We had stand-up desks, and it was a noisy, hectic, wide-open environment. It was every person for themselves, standing up all day shouting into the phone, except when you went to a private room to interview candidates. Success was based on your ability to forge and maintain strong relationships with clients and candidates. That remains the case today, despite all the changes we’ve experienced in technology and the global economy.The Telephone Era Back then we were on the phone all day (and night) because there was no other way to find stuff out. We spent all day talking to people – that was how we conducted research. You couldn’t log on to a computer and google the top 15 companies in a particular industry. The only way to get accurate information from reliable sources was by consulting with a small handful of people who had a unique industry perspective and inside information. Everything was analog. We’d sort through big files of CVs, page by page. It was a raw industry. There were no digital tools, no guidelines; you’d just do whatever you could with the resources at hand to close a deal.The Internet Disrupts Search and ResearchThe advent of the internet changed the search part of a recruiter’s job. The evolution of job boards and social media networks means we can now identify and profile candidates easily. Today, instead of barking on the phone, pacing back and forth, I see recruiters spending a lot of time seated at their desks, using their laptops electronic devices to look at databases and scroll through social media tools like Linkedin and job boards like JobsDB.com.Digital technology makes mass communication easy. With email and social network apps, it is no longer necessary to make 100 phone calls each day. The internet allows headhunters to recruit by remote. I spent six years of my career recruiting for jobs in Tokyo; all that time I was based in Bangkok. The More Things Change, the More they Stay the SameThere is no denying the massive benefits of internet technology. But strong relationship-building skills are still the hallmark of a successful recruiter.For example, if I do not understand my clients’ business and office culture intimately, I won’t be able to find a candidate who is the perfect fit.We’ve got to know our job candidates closely as well. When people change jobs, the decision generally has something to do with changes in their life situation: a child on the way, a move to another city, a divorce. A recruiter needs to understand this as well: sometimes it’s about more than just matching skillsets with a resume. Without a profound understanding of the people you are dealing with, it is very difficult to do a good job as a recruiter. It is not enough to just find somebody a job, or fill a position for your client. We need to find people the right jobs, so they can settle in and be happy long-term.Specialisation is a PrerequisiteNowadays, recruiters need to specialise in a particular industry sector. Because if you’re going to have a comprehensive understanding of your clients and candidates, you must understand their business – the trends, the technology, the jargon.For example, I need to know what companies across the logistics sector are doing, in order to help the companies I am working for in the most effective way. Likewise, I won’t have the gravitas required to earn a candidate’s trust if I am not also an expert in the field who can speak their language. The best candidates get approached form all directions now. There are so many recruiters buzzing in their ears, the only way I can stand out and get their attention is if I have real industry expertise. ESG: More Important Than EverThe competition to hire the most qualified, capable candidates is tight in today’s market. Elite candidates know this, and they are more discerning about what company’s they will consider working for.Take interviews, for example. Before, an interview was essentially one-way traffic: a company representative looks at a candidate’s resume, asks a series of questions. If the candidate gives satisfactory answers and is technically qualified, they’ll probably be offered the job.The balance of power has shifted recently. Now, interviews are just as much about the candidate asking questions of the employer as vice-versa.ESG issues have become important to job seekers, especially those who are in demand. If a recruiter wants to attract the best candidates in today’s market, they need to understand shape and flavour of the company they are recruiting for. To close a deal with mediocre talent, it often doesn’t take more than a modest salary raise. But if your client demands top talent, the office culture and company values must be a strong match: elite talent cares as much or more about ethics, diversity, and environmental standards, as the job description and salary.Reputation is KingAs a recruiter I need to be careful with the clients I represent: if I work for a company that has a reputation as a polluter, or as has a poor track record in terms of labour disputes, it reflects poorly on me. Reputation is king in this business.The reputation of a recruiter is important not only in terms of expert knowledge and industry specialization. We also need to know enough about the industry and the major players in the sector to know which companies are the best brands to work for. If I have a shoe store, I need to stock the best shoes, the most popular brands that people want to wear, the ones that represent a certain status, or lifestyle, or values.  Similarly, as a recruiter, I need to partner with and represent great companies, if I want to succeed. Even with advanced technology, the reputation and character of the recruiter is often the most important element for closing a placement. The best candidates are only going to listen to an approach from a recruiter who is knowledgeable; who will take the time to understand and get to know them personally; who will talk sincerely, and help them find the best opportunities. The internet is a phenomenal resource. The benefits for doing business are undeniable. But it also generates a lot of noise that we struggle to cut through. Like any other business or shop with a presence on the internet, a recruiter needs to be perceived as having a unique brand. He or she must have excellent reviews and high ratings. When a candidate lands on your LinkedIn profile, they want to see that you are connected to the right people. Like everyone else in the information age, recruiters are under a microscope in a way they never used to be.In the old days, I simply needed to be as good a salesman as possible, and to get the best information available from industry sources. Now I need to be a marketeer, with a social media presence that builds my own unique brand. The Future of RecruitmentIf I can make one prediction about the future of the business, it is this: The days of contingency recruitment are numbered.Contingency recruitment does not suit the nature of the industry. It is unfairly priced for all parties involved. The average success rate for contingency recruiting is 20 percent. This makes contingency recruiting a free-for-all: the client ends up paying a big fee, because agencies price their commissions at high levels to make up for the majority of work done on placements that they ultimately do not get paid for.The contingency model at JacksonGrant is gradually being replaced by Recruitment as a Service (RaaS). RaaS is a subscription model that gives a company greater flexibility. For a monthly fee, clients can access the full breadth of an agency’s resources as they see fit. RaaS allows for a true partnership between recruiter and client, because the interests of both parties are more closely aligned.I see lots of recruitment companies around the globe shifting to RaaS. It is undoubtedly the future of recruitment. It benefits candidates, our clients pay less, and it encourages recruiters to develop expertise and specialisation to work more intimately with clients. This in turn leads to greater credibility with candidates. It is a win-win for everybody.If you’d like to learn more about how JacksonGrant’s RaaS subscription model can help your company attract the best talent, I’m happy to have that conversation: please reach out to me here. 

View
JacksonGrant Recruitment is not all Champagne and Roses
Jan
23
JacksonGrant Recruitment is not all Champagne and Roses

It is likely that this is the most honest and vulnerable article that I have or will ever write. Although many people have congratulated me on my success, it comes at a price, and I must make more sacrifices if I wish to develop further.  After writing this I realise that: a) This is a pretty lengthy piece; and b) It will likely require a Part Two. For ease of reference, I have broken the article into the following sections: Work-Life Balance Winding Down Relationship Health  Friendships Imposter Syndrome and Self-Doubt Management  Disappointment Self-Branding Partnership Candidate Management Deep breath, let's get started! Work-Life Balance What's that! I honestly can't remember the last time I packed up at the end of the day and was able to relax. As well as living almost 50km from the office, I usually do recruitment work or respond to emails when I am at home. A successful recruitment consultant is not a 9-to-5 job in my opinion; if someone knows a way, please share with me. To then manage and lead a company, well there aren't enough hours in the day.  I would advise those who wish to become recruiters to make sacrifices and add some time to their week outside of office hours when they are willing to do additional work. Although I cannot or would not force anyone to do this, I simply don't think you can be successful without putting in the extra effort. I must stress here: you can be successful working a 9-5, I just don’t know how.  You also need to make time for face to face engagements with clients and candidates and this often has to be outside of office hours. Winding Down It is often impossible for me to do this. At the end of the day there are so many balls to juggle my brain refuses to switch off and I struggle to sleep. It really is hard to let go. As I can't turn off my brain, I can't sleep as my mind is constantly thinking of things to do the next day. Relationship I got married almost 3 years ago and whereas my wife and I are very happy there is an incredible strain on my relationship due to the business I am in. Luckily my wife is also a workaholic and often works 7 days a week. In fact, she makes me feel lazy. As a result of her hard work, she is becoming a very successful businesswoman.  We are at the stage where we are planning a family – to be honest, when you get home at the end of the day and it's the magic time to make babies, it often doesn't feel like the timing is right.  Health Wow, where do I start? At the beginning of 2022 I was weighing in at a hefty 92.5 kg (14.5 stone) and something needed to give. I was lucky to find a personal trainer to help me, and since I started training in late March, I have reduced my weight to 85kg. I still have a poor diet which is the result of not wanting to cook after a long day, and taking the chance when I can find the time to stuff my face. I am aware my eating habits are not conducive to good health, but needs must.  My hair! My ex-colleagues in the government in the UK will say I always had a 50p sized hole in the back of my head but now you can probably fit in a few in a couple of pounds’ worth. I have grayed at the sides – and let's not mention the wrinkles. My doctor says I am close to acute stress and need to manage this carefully. I have conducted personality tests which have shown I have an above average level of resilience, but I don't want to drop dead of a heart attack one day. Friendships I have severely neglected my circle of friends in Thailand and the ones in the UK are almost non-existent, bar a few. My job involves talking, communicating, socialising and generally being good with people; and it's draining. I am not shy or introverted, but when socialising is part of the job, you also need some downtime.  Imposter Syndrome & Self-Doubt As a child I was raised in a wonderful family that was very much working class. I grew up in a tough city. Although not involved myself in violence, drugs and crime, it was a part of daily life. I wasn't the best educated, as I worked from a young age to provide the material trappings I thought I needed. I was always taught by my father that I didn't have to be the smartest, I just had to outwork people, and this is a principal which has led to becoming a partner in my company. That said, I do suffer from imposter syndrome. My accent and language are not the most polished; and whereas I have fantastic manners (thanks mum), I am not the most cultured. In my role negotiating with CEO's and MD's who are much more educated and higher class than me it can lead to self-doubt. It took me a long time to come to terms with this.  Management By far the hardest part of my job is being a manager and leader: the reason, simply put, is people. Without people (your staff), you are nothing. Nothing prepared me for being a manager in Thailand and the intimate details that you learn about their lives. I share the burden of their stresses to support them; to a large extent I need to be selfless.  As a person who admittedly can be selfish at times, this is a really tough challenge. I had to make the transition from being a top biller, to being a top manager who can still bill high while enabling others to become high billers too; it's a completely different job description.  On top of this, you need to have clear boundaries: whereas I would like to be closer friends with my staff, to maintain professionalism, I just can't.  Disappointment As a recruiter, we are never the masters of our own destiny. As a recruiter you need to take criticism with a smile, disappointment with a shrug, and rejection as the norm. Failure to do so will result in the collapse of your career.  At my company I strive always to provide the best service. I see recruitment as a complex puzzle to solve. Sometimes you fail, and when the stakes are high, it really hurts.  I remember the first big deal I lost. I stupidly counted the commission before the deal was done and was planning all the lovely things, I was going to treat myself to. That was a mistake I have never repeated. I always educate my staff that we really don't matter in the grand scheme of things. We are a conduit to make things happen, and we can celebrate in the background. Self-Branding  This is something I have been teased and ridiculed on now for a few years and again it stings. I realize the importance of branding and social media and I do think sometimes the recruitment industry overdoes it.  I’ll let you in on a secret: we aren't posting to flaunt our successes; we are using social media as a tool to attract the best recruiters out there. Hiring is a big challenge, especially because we are trying to find consultants that want to grow and challenge themselves.  Partnership Working closely with Richard is tough. For those that know him he is a no-nonsense, workaholic who demands the very best. He will not ask people to do anything he wouldn't do himself –as the Managing Director he is our leader.  He is certainly my role model and coach and I have immense thanks and gratitude for him making me his partner – but that doesn't always mean we see eye to eye. We have had shouting matches that I probably lost, but what keeps us working together is that no grudges are held, we shake hands at the end of a heated discussion, and he is always right (I say that tongue in cheek). Candidate Management Candidate relationships are massively important but sometimes it is impossible to speak to everyone that wants to talk to you. I receive a lot of messages and emails asking for consultations, but there are only so many hours in the day. I hate disappointing people, but as my role grows it is becoming nearly impossible to keep up with the demand. Without candidates, however, my role is redundant, so I try to meet as many as humanly possible.  If you found value in this piece, I am happy to follow up with a Part 2. For all other communications you can reach me on LinkedIn, or email at alexander@jacksongrant.io Published: 24 January 2022

View
Our predictions for 2023 recruitment trends in Thailand
Jan
16
Our predictions for 2023 recruitment trends in Thailand

Recruitment in Thailand has been an exciting place to be over the past year. While challenges and opportunities were available to Thai businesses, with increasing digitalisation and advancements in technology, and globalisation, a shortage of skilled candidates made it a challenging market. We’ve discussed how those changes affected jobseekers looking to move roles, but here’s how 2022 shaped the recruitment market for employers in Thailand.   Big trends affecting recruitment in Thailand last year   1. Global crises caused fluctuating employment rates The global economy continued to experience shocks in 2022. Supply chain difficulties and the increasing costs of energy have slowed recovery in the manufacturing and engineering sectors, among others. This has meant different sectors continue to experience fluctuations in employment levels with tech recovering quickly – unsurprisingly - as other sectors struggle.   2. Increasing interest from overseas businesses  Thailand offers a wealth of opportunities for businesses from the manufacturing, supply chain and engineering sectors. The favourable conditions have attracted interest from large international corporations from the UK, EU and US and is fuelling demand for candidates in those sectors with high-level English skills and who are a good cultural fit.   3. Widespread consequences of digitalisation  Digital technologies are impacting all areas of business in Thailand. The increasing digitalisation of the economy has allowed skilled candidates to work remotely and attracted an influx of international businesses to Thailand in 2022. It is also behind the increasing demand for digital, IT and technical skills from all businesses.     Our predictions for recruitment trends in 2023   Many of these factors will be prevalent as we head into 2023. But there are several emerging trends that we predict will have a huge impact on how recruiting in engineering, supply chain and manufacturing may change in 2023. Here are our top five recruitment trends to look out for:   1. An even greater focus on ED&I in leadership roles Large multinational companies operating in Thailand are extremely aware of the importance of strong Equality, Diversity & Inclusion (ED&I) policies. Companies that embrace gender diversity amongst leadership teams are more competitive and more profitable than those that don’t. Not to mention diverse companies are more attractive to younger workers with 47% of millennials looking for ED&I commitments from their employers.    2. Recession does not necessarily mean fewer opportunities A dichotomy is emerging between those businesses who are anticipating a recession and those who are experiencing significant growth in their fields. Those who are experiencing growth are open to entering new regions and markets. Thailand is especially attractive to overseas manufacturing and engineering businesses seeking to expand or relocate.   Opportunities to hire talent in such a market are high as skilled candidates may be looking to transfer from industries and businesses who are struggling.   3. Candidates with technical skills will continue to be highly sought after  Technical and digital skills will remain in high demand. It is estimated that there are 10 million manufacturing roles currently unfilled due to a lack of technically-skilled candidates. As a result, employers are on the lookout for candidates with easily transferable skillsets who can be brought in from other industries.     The digitalisation and transformation of the Thai manufacturing, engineering, and logistics sectors means leaders in those industries will be looking for candidates with cyber security, Cloud, IT infrastructure and project management skills.   4. An escalating need for English skills  Thailand is an attractive destination for foreign investors and international businesses thanks to solid economic growth, tax breaks for companies relocating to Thailand and government support for manufacturing and digital businesses. With Thailand as a commercial focal point in South-East Asia, demand for employees with proficiency in English remains high.     5. Employers must focus on retention As employers struggle to recruit candidates with digital, English and technical skills there will be a greater focus on retention going into 2023. This comes as candidates re-evaluate what they want from the workplace, with a recent study suggesting up to 73% of employees in Thailand would consider moving roles if salaries don’t increase.    Candidates are also weighing up the pros and cons of higher salaries versus professional development opportunities. We call this the “earn vs learn dilemma.” Whilst higher salaries are attractive in the short term, smart employers can attract and retain high-calibre candidates by offering training in business-critical skills, technical skills and leadership skills.   Take advantage of 2023’s Thai recruitment trends with JacksonGrant   Are you a manufacturing, engineering and technical businesses looking to attract and retain the best talent for your business in Thailand? Our expert consultants get right to the heart of your needs and, using their in-depth knowledge of Thailand’s exciting recruitment market, can build you a recruitment strategy that is both cost-effective and achieves the right outcomes for your business.   Whether you're based locally or are an overseas organisation looking to break into the Thai markets, we can find high-quality candidates who are knowledgeable in international and local engineering, supply chain, manufacturing, infrastructure, life sciences and digital & technology industries.   Get in touch to set up a free consultation or submit a job vacancy today.  

View
Meet the Newest Member of JacksonGrant’s Management Team: Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn
Jan
9
Meet the Newest Member of JacksonGrant’s Management Team: Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn

To support JacksonGrant’s plans for future growth, veteran recruiter Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn – Khun Pui – has joined the agency as Director of Customer Success. With a 20-year career in recruiting, Khun Pui brings a wealth of experience to the team. In this week’s blog, she discusses the benefits of working for a close-knit agency, and JacksonGrant’s game-changing Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) strategy.       A New Job Title, A New Role I joined JacksonGrant in the third quarter of 2022, in anticipation of the rebranding initiative. It was a huge career move. I left a big global consulting firm where I had worked for more than 17 years, as Associate Director of Recruitment.  Now I am embarking on a new journey with JacksonGrant in a newly created role: Director of Customer Success. I am responsible for providing client support in day-to-day operations, strategic business growth development, and maintaining profitability. I am also the team leader for important Retail client accounts. I feel lucky to have this new job with JacksonGrant. I am excited about managing a new team, and serving as project manager on key accounts.   Making the Move from a Giant Global Agency  Previously in my career, I specialised in Finance, Accounting, and HR, with a global consultancy firm that has many divisions and offices throughout the world. It was a wide-ranging role that required a different kind of focus and perspective than the more personal, close-knit culture we have at JacksonGrant. JacksonGrant is a smaller organisation, but what hasn’t changed is that I still manage a motivated team of recruitment professionals dedicated to helping our clients succeed. I am coaching junior consultants with lots of on-the-job training. It takes a lot of attention and care to build and mentor my team. I show them the best way to handle candidates and clients, ensure industry best practices are followed, and advise them how to manage different (and sometimes difficult!) personalities.    A Refreshing Office Culture At my old job, it was impossible to know everyone in the company. At JacksonGrant everyone is very close, we all know each other. It’s very easy to communicate with the MD because he sits right next to me! It’s an open office environment, it does not feel like a hierarchical culture: everyone is very approachable. When I see junior staff struggling to find a solution to a challenge, I will suggest taking a different approach, depending on the client or candidate involved. At the same time, I can freely share my opinions and expertise with our executive leadership, and I feel it is always valued and appreciated. All this makes it easier to get help and support from the team if you get stuck in a search.   More Advanced Search Technology JacksonGrant may be a smaller agency, but we have more advanced search technology here than my previous employer. I am learning more about how technology can better support recruitment and client service. There is more robust database support, better information available about clients and candidates, and we consistently track candidates even after they’ve been considered for a position. This helps us build more effective talent pools, giving JacksonGrant access to a wider variety and greater number of candidates.    Recruitment as a Service (RaaS): A More Personalised & Sustainable Business Model The main difference between JacksonGrant and bigger, global firms is the contractual relationship that we have with clients. Under the sprawling, global consultancy model, I worked strictly on contingency. JacksonGrant’s revolutionary Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) is a different type of mutually beneficial arrangement. Clients can secure an exclusive relationship with JacksonGrant for a fixed monthly subscription fee. Our team of experts work closely with each client on their account, with the aim of developing a much closer, long-term relationship.  With an RaaS subscription, consultants can work more assuredly and harmoniously with clients. We find that greater shared mutual interest results in a more long-term, sustainable business relationship. JacksonGrant works together with our clients more like partners, in contrast to traditional headhunting agencies. One of the main benefits of the RaaS model is the increased attention we can give to filling less high-profile roles. With a subscription, clients are assured that recruiters make a strong commitment to source small or junior roles that often are ignored by the big agencies who work on contingency. In the recruitment business, consultants at global organisations do not have much incentive to prioritise searches for lower-salaried roles.    Junior management roles in SouthEast Asia may not pay a big salary, but these roles are crucially important for regional businesses. Because the contingency fees are fairly low for finding candidates for junior positions, headhunters at worldwide agencies often do not give these searches the attention that clients deserve.  But with RaaS, junior roles that need to be filled are bundled together as part of a bigger subscription package that includes executive recruitment. At JacksonGrant, each and every job vacancy merits the attention of experienced recruiters. Candidates, meanwhile, won’t notice the difference between RaaS and contingency job-hunting: they will receive the same award-winning service and personal attention as always.  Our goal in 2023 is to encourage more clients to subscribe to our unique RaaS offering. We are confident that is the best way to ensure customer success, deliver the best results possible, and sustain a long term, mutually beneficial partnership between client and recruiter.   For more information please feel free to check out the JacksonGrant website at JacksonGrant.io or reach out to our Linkedin at Jackson Grant Recruitment Co., Ltd. 

View
Do you need to upskill or recruit to meet industry 4.0?
Jan
3
Do you need to upskill or recruit to meet industry 4.0?

In the current drive to increase automation and digital transformation, particularly in engineering and manufacturing, a skills gap is increasing. This fourth revolution in industry, Industry 4.0, is unprecedented. According to a study by PWC, 45% of jobs in Thailand will be automated in some way and the talent shortage caused by widespread digital transformation could cost the Thai economy34 billion USD by 2030. This gives employers two options: to upskill their existing workforce, a strategy which has many benefits but can be slow. Alternatively, businesses could consider hiring new staff with experience in the required technologies who could hit the ground running, however, hiring at scale can be time consuming and costly. Successful businesses will be those that combine both strategies for a holistic solution to the talent shortage. Whichever strategy your business chooses, you’ll need a dedicated recruiting partner who understands the manufacturing and engineering sector and the technological trends that influence the skills you need. A recruiting provider like JacksonGrant can help you build a long-term strategy that will future-proof your business. Upskilling advantages and disadvantages Investing in your current workforce and building training and development plans for upskilling is an attractive prospect for many employers. Not only is it a cost-effective means of acquiring new skills, but it allows you to focus on obtaining only the skills and abilities you need both now and in the future. Upskilling has other benefits too. By showing commitment to your current workforce you: Reduce hiring costs Improve staff engagement and morale Reduce turnover and staff attrition Attract new talent Provide a better quality of service However, upskilling can be a slow process. Training employees up to a high standard in new skills takes time and sometimes results in pushback from staff who don’t embrace change. The other danger is that your employees become increasingly attractive to your competitors, meaning you may have to work harder to retain key employees.  Recruiting advantages and disadvantages Hiring for the skills you need is a quick way to target candidates with the expertise and technical experience in the required technologies who can provide strategic insight for your business. It allows you to address skills gaps instantly and reduce pressure on your current workforce.  Hiring new employees can also: Introduce new perspectives Boost employee morale  Grow your business and reach new clients Provide support to internal training programmes To achieve maximum success when deciding to bring new employees into your business you must ensure that your onboarding procedures are robust and capable of bringing new employees up to speed with your corporate practices, systems, and values. Hiring new employees is costly and you want to ensure you get the quickest return on your investment. Finding new talent for in-demand skills can also be a challenge, as competition is high. Many candidates may simply not possess the skillset you need. Only by providing an attractive environment to the most desirable candidates will you beat your competitors.  Build a long-term strategy and meet Industry 4.0 with a recruitment partner  Whether you choose to focus on upskilling, are committed to hiring for new skills or are considering a blended strategy JacksonGrant can act as your dedicated Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) partner. At JacksonGrant we focus on providing the best solutions to fulfil your recruitment needs. Combining knowledge of the manufacturing and engineering industries with experience of the Thai hiring market and the latest recruitment technology we offer adaptable, agile RaaS solutions. This unique RaaS model is sustainable and holistic, helping you integrate every aspect of your recruitment processes. From optimised hiring lead times and streamlined onboarding to increasing candidate engagement to ensure long-lasting placements. We aim to act as an extension of your business and to ensure that you are ready for whatever the future of industry in Thailand holds. Get in touch to set up a free consultation, submit a job vacancy or explore other existing content on our insights page.

View
How Your Business Can Benefit by Building a Talent Pool
Dec
19
How Your Business Can Benefit by Building a Talent Pool

Building a talent pool is a proactive way to help organisations fill future positions – some of these roles may not even exist yet, but often are crucially important for future operations. A talent pool is much more than just a database of relevant candidate profiles: in my opinion, it is the best tool that we have for proactive recruiting. What is a Talent Pool?A talent pool is a database that recruiters maintain for specific companies. It is a collection of candidates who may have expressed an interest in working for your organization, or who have a specialised set of skills that are a good fit for your business. The database often includes candidates who applied in the past and interviewed well, but who didn’t make the final cut. It may include individuals working in the region who have demonstrated a high degree of scientific or engineering mastery. It could also be comprised of individuals with a general profile and character who a recruiter knows will be a match for your company’s workplace culture. A talent pool may include individuals who work in similar roles for competing organisations, but have signalled to a headhunter that they would consider making a career move. Workers who may have previously worked for your organization and left amicably might also be included.In short, a talent pool is a group of qualified professionals who an experienced recruiter has identified as potentially ideal candidates to work for your company. The more experienced and sophisticated your recruiter, the more effective and powerful your talent pool will be. For example, I often use talent pools compiled specifically to find highly skilled candidates for the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries in Southeast Asia, my area of specialisation. Some of these roles include a senior hire in Regulatory Affairs for a well-known pharma company in Thailand; a Country Manager for a medical device manufacturer in Vietnam; the National Sales Director for a hospital group in Thailand; a Senior Manager OTC for a pharmaceutical company in Malaysia; and the Vice-President for a global healthcare group in Singapore.  How to Start Building Your Talent PoolThe first step is to identify future hiring needs. Given the trajectory of your business, your organisation's strategy, and market dynamics, ask yourself where skills gaps are most likely to appear. Your recruiter should act as a trusted partner in this process. It’s important to discuss the development of your organization, so the recruiter can understand and weigh variables such as employee turnover, upcoming promotions, business growth, market headwinds, and other factors that will affect your hiring needs. Once I am familiar with my clients’ business, I can provide better analysis, and ask more pertinent questions to ensure we are putting in place the best management team possible to navigate future market conditions. For example, I can recall asking clients the following questions: Does the Sales Manager you are promoting have any demonstrable SFE experience? Does your Regulatory Affairs Manager have any submission experience in your new target countries? Does your HR Director have management experience to lead a larger team? Is your IT Function upskilling in line with new technologies that are coming to market? Depending on the answers, I can adjust my search accordingly, and fine-tune the customised talent pools that we maintain for each client.Talent Pools in ActionThere has been a sharp uptick in demand for talented leaders in the life science field within Southeast Asia. Proactively identifying client needs and setting up talent pools will give your organisation an edge over the competition. Recently my team at JacksonGrant has been working on market mapping key senior leadership positions within the ASEAN healthcare space. An up-to-date talent pool enables us to make vital hires over a prolonged period. Plus, we can execute the hire as soon as the vacant position goes live. Our strategy recognises that to place the most suitable candidate for a particular opportunity, we require a large talent pool of applicants to choose from. Candidates who are included in the pool are routinely contacted by JacksonGrant consultants. This way, when a client has an urgent need for talent, we don’t need to concern ourselves with building new relationships or ‘selling’ the position to random candidates. By the time the need for a new position arises, the groundwork has already been done.As specialist recruiters, JacksonGrant is constantly engaged with and cultivating the talent pools our clients require: whether that is sourcing for current vacancies, attending industry networking events, or continually engaging new talent through referrals, we are in constant communication with the people your business will need.When you have the legwork and hustle required to develop effective talent pools, and blend it together with the global network of life science professionals I have built up over a decade in the industry, it is a recipe for recruiting success. With a combination of market-mapping analysis, maintenance of talent pools, and years of developing personal relationships at the highest levels of the healthcare industry, I am uniquely well-equipped to identify and engage key leaders in healthcare and pharmaceutical industries for my clients.If your business needs to execute critical hires almost immediately, whilst saving time and money on ad hoc recruitment fees, then reach out to me today to learn how JacksonGrant Life Sciences can build and manage your customised Talent Pool.

View
Introducing : JacksonGrant  A new name for our improved recruitment services
Dec
15
Introducing : JacksonGrant A new name for our improved recruitment services

2022 has been an incredible year for our business, culminating in being awarded Outstanding Small Company of 2022 at the BCCT King Power Thailand Business Awards (TIBA). Having also celebrated the milestone of our ten-year anniversary, we realised that we wanted to continue to build upon our success in new ways. As a result of this reflection, we’ve set about making some changes to better demonstrate our service offering, culture, ambitions and goals. We hope that many of those changes will become clear over time through our continued dedication to providing the highest levels of service for both our clients and candidates. One of the largest changes we’re making is the adoption of a new name for the business. We are proud to introduce our new name, JacksonGrant. Why we’ve changed our name The landscape of recruitment in Thailand has changed dramatically since we opened our doors in 2012. The adoption of new technologies and an increased focus on candidate experience and engagement has meant recruiters have to speed up the recruitment process and has changed the way we build relationships with both clients and candidates. Throughout all these changes, the partnership between our MD, Richard Jackson, and Director of Recruitment Operations, Alex Grant, has been one of our greatest strengths. Richard’s exceptional understanding of the Thai recruitment market has been complemented by Alex’s experience and skill at executive search and dedication to the principles of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion. Our new name JacksonGrant is a celebration of Richard and Alex’s collaboration and the combination of their strengths. How becoming JacksonGrant helps our team Becoming JacksonGrant will help to strengthen our team of talented and passionate recruiters by giving them the tools and opportunities to work hard for our clients and candidates. Our focus will be on: Developing internal talent and creating a team of leaders Creating a collaborative culture where we learn from each other Working with leading clients in the Thai technical industry space Bringing the best service possible to candidates and clients How our new name benefits you, our clients and customers For our valued clients, both new and old, we will be well placed to provide: Better services to help build out your leadership and executive teams Better penetration in the Thai labour market for niche hiring Better ideas about improving retention during talent shortage Better technology and out-of-the-box thinking for your hiring strategies Our customised, integrated RaaS (Recruitment as a Service) which blended combines elements of RPO, Project Recruitment and Executive Search for unparalleled results and cost savings And for our candidates, we will continue to aim to be your life-long recruitment partner, with our attention focussed on:  Ensuring you have access to great career paths with leading employers and the opportunities to develop your skills and experience. Finding roles that fulfil your goals and ambitions as well as providing excellent organisational fit Providing exceptional guidance and advice at every stage of the recruitment journey, including salary advice, career goalsetting and CV and interview support. Enjoy our new brand and services If you’re ready to take your career to the next level with JacksonGrant, check out our latest roles. Or if you’re looking for outstanding hiring services, get in touch.

View
What’s the secret to JacskonGrant’s success? Alex Grant explains
Nov
22
What’s the secret to JacskonGrant’s success? Alex Grant explains

RLC,now known as JacksonGrant, was named the Outstanding Small Company of 2022 at the BCCT King Power Thailand Business Awards (TIBA) last month. It’s the second significant accolade RLC has received this year: In September the agency won the Best in Client Service Award (Asia) at Vincere’s Vinny Awards. Why has JacksonGrant been receiving so much recognition lately? JacksonGrant’s Brand & Marketing Executive Chanuchida ‘Cook-Kik’ Korranut interviews Alexander Grant, Director of Recruitment Operations, to learn more about how the agency manages to punch above its weight and stay on top of an increasingly challenging marketplace.COOK Kik: Were you surprised that we won the BCCT award?Alex Grant: Yes. There was a lot of competition, and a lot of innovative companies nominated, so it came as a huge surprise. Perhaps it shouldn’t have come as such a great surprise, because this is 2nd prize we’ve won this year, along with Best in Client Service from Vincere. In any case, it is a big honour to be named the Most Outstanding Small Business in all of Thailand.I think these accolades & recognition are down to the fact that we continuously try to provide innovative solutions in recruitment, during a time when the industry is becoming increasingly transactional.A lot of companies are mainly engaged in CV-farming, whereas we develop relationships with candidates and clients on a personal level; we build deeper, long-lasting ties with the people we work with.In essence, we make an effort to go the extra mile to serve clients and job-seekers alike.Cook Kik: What are some of the innovations that JacksonGrant has introduced? Alex: We are now providing Recruitment as a Service [RaaS]; it’s a game-changer.The benefits include massive cost savings for clients, easy-to-forecast billing, an affordable monthly subscription plan, time-saving, integrated expertise, and dedicated client support.We’ve also introduced new technologies, such as our BI dashboards, which provide comprehensive data and additional insights for our clients on their end-to-end hiring timeline.By working in partnership, rather than on a contingency basis, we are providing more than just a recruitment service. With the aid of cutting-edge technology, we are building client algorithms … this means that the more we search, the better the results become.Cook-Kik:Why is Raas better than the traditional contingency recruitment model?Alex:The traditional model has a service rate, or success fee of 18-25%. On average, with contingent recruitment, only 20% of the jobs that consultants work on are successfully placed. This means that consultants will, on average, waste 80% of their time on non-billing activities under the contingency model. They are more likely to move onto another job before finding a solution for the client. With contingency recruiting, the client is often left unsatisfied, with their much-needed position remaining unfilled. Recruiting consultants naturally give up on a search after a period of time, because there is no incentive to push on and solve the problem. It becomes a function of diminishing returns for their labour.With RaaS, our consultants are motivated to push through the barriers that are inherent with contingency recruiting: there’s no wasted time.  Cook Kik:Can you give an example of how RaaS works in practice?Alex:Sure. One of our clients recently had six positions remain open for 15 months. During that time, they advertised extensively online, but failed to find matching candidates. They gave these positions to multiple recruitment agencies; they all failed to fill the positions. Then they came to us and signed up for RaaS. We faced the same challenges that others faced; however, we conducted a deeper analysis into why the candidates weren’t matching. We determined that the seniority levels were incorrect, and the job descriptions did not precisely match with the work each position entailed. We have managed to place five out of those six vacancies in three months. And we haven’t given up on the sixth.Cook-Kik:How was JacksonGrant able to achieve in 3 months what several other agencies could not in more than one year?Alex:Our subscription model truly enhances our ability to find the right candidates.We’ve put in a tremendous amount of legwork over the past 10 years, and now we – and our clients –are reaping the rewards of the relationships we’ve cultivated. JacksonGrant consultants develop detailed talent maps that reach all the way from junior positions to the senior executive level.People whom we placed in junior to mid-level jobs five years ago are now running entire country operations or leading regional divisions; we know where they are at and where they came from, they are our friends. We helped them get to where they are today. This is why our network is so powerful, and why we continue to get results when others fail.Cook-Kik:How does the special technology you mentioned help with RaaS?Alex:In past we had to do a lot of manual research. Now, by using advanced tech and algorithms, and Boolean searches, it drastically reduces the time it takes to do these things.With this mapping technology, and deep experience with consulting, our clients are able to get more well-rounded advice based on facts and less on conjecture … our analytics are data-driven, not emotional, not someone’s opinion. It gives us more time to spend on what’s more important, which are namely our candidates and the clients. Cook Kik:What do you have planned to stay ahead of the pack in 2023?Alex:We will expand our RaaS service, we will scale back our rec-tech [contingency] efforts, and we will strengthen our executive search division.We anticipate a lot of activity in Manufacturing, Engineering, and Supply Chain in the coming year. A lot of our focus will be on these sectors. We also will continue to invest in the latest recruitment technology software to stay ahead of the curve – at no extra cost to our clients.

View
MD Richard Jackson Reflects on RLC Recruitment’s 10th Anniversary
Nov
7
MD Richard Jackson Reflects on RLC Recruitment’s 10th Anniversary

RLC celebrates our 10th anniversary this year. It’s amazing how fast the time has flown by, and how much has changed in the recruitment business since we founded RLC in 2012. We’ve grown quickly: from a startup, to Thailand’s leading technical recruiter, in only 10 years. Then and Now: Recruitment in Thailand has ChangedIt is striking how much technology has changed the recruiting landscape. When we started out 10 years ago, online networking tools like LinkedIn were not universally used; job boards were much simpler – listings were predominantly in Thai language, and the formatting was basic, using early-stage technology. When we founded RLC, English-language fluency was not so common in professional circles. It has grown by leaps and bounds since then.Our main challenge back then was locating candidates. In 2012, the dynamic of recruitment in Thailand was fairly straightforward. The focus was mainly on search: Our job mainly revolved around finding resumes with technical skill sets that matched our clients’ needs in emerging manufacturing, logistics and supply chain industries.I feel fortunate to have established RLC and laid the foundation for my career during these simpler times. Back then, recruiters had to invest more in building relationships. There was no such thing as a video interview, or working by remote. Zoom meetings did not even exist. We used Skype, but I can remember jumping on the bus several times a month to travel south from Bangkok to Rayong and Pattaya, to meet candidates with whom I am still close friends with today. Face-to-face engagement was an indispensable part of the job.The Emergence of Advanced Technology & Candidate EngagementThe biggest changes happening in the recruitment business are due to the rapid emergence of new technology platforms.In the past three years, the explosion of technology means recruiters must expedite the search and vetting process. Video technology especially is cutting things short, and this has a knock-on effect with candidate engagement.Individual engagement with the job application process is reduced when a candidate can apply for 50 jobs on LinkedIn in less than an hour. Recruitment Still Needs a Human TouchI’ve always been a big proponent of the human side of the recruitment business.Technology should support human interaction, building relationships, help us to improve the emotional management of candidates, to understand their motivations, and establish real connections. In short, technology should support human relationships, not replace it. If we were to digitise all of our interactions, then our relationships become strictly transactional. In fact, we cannot digitise influencing and relationship-building. Our relationships are fundamentally the result of taking the time to build trust with another human being: it is an art as much as a skill.Unfortunately, many companies have a mistaken perception about the recruitment process. In some quarters, the idea persists that all headhunters really do is sift through and identify CVs. But the elevated churn rates we’re experiencing now should serve as proof that there is much more to recruitment than resume-searching.What makes the difference between a good and great recruiter is the ability to build communities. Personal relationships lead to strong referrals. It’s how we determine if a candidate is a good fit for our clients’ office culture. It’s how we ascertain a candidate’s real-world capabilities. This is stuff you don’t get from reading a resume. The best recruiters in the market have made consistent efforts to build relationships that endure. ‘Pressing the flesh’ is still important.Getting to know candidates as they develop their careers, helping and guiding them to the next level, and sharing success is how we reach the next stage of recruiting excellence. When industries mature and reach a certain market saturation point, we often see an artisanal movement arise. Craft beer and farm-to-table eateries are a perfect example of how dedicated restauranteurs have tried to preserve authenticity in their trade, while other proprietors seem to rush towards providing lower priced, lower quality, high-volume products for the masses.Strategies for Survival vs ThrivalWorking as a recruitment consultant can be very stressful. There is the potential for great rewards, but no guarantee of success, and a huge demand on recruiters’ personal time. If we are to compete effectively to recruit and retain talent for ourselves, I think the recruitment industry needs to recognise that we are at a crossroads. We need to think about how we can balance productivity with an attractive life-career balance for employees. As an industry, we need new client solutions to suit the new workforce situation.How do we achieve this?I see two emerging strategies, and the choice between them is a fork in the road.1 – We accept that the recruitment industry will always have a high churn rate. The response is to develop a factory-style recruiting process. Sourcing consultants can be trained quickly, and agencies can remain competitive by dropping fees. Ultimately, this is a race to bottom that views recruitment as purely transactional. It is not my preference.2 – Add genuine value in the more intangible, creative aspects of the job. This includes more intensive and improved client management, strengthening offline connections in specific industries and local communities, and a consultative business-partnering approach. This is a more human, less transactional approach to recruitment, the one that I favour.This is why, moving forward, RLC is developing ‘Recruitment as a Service’ (RaaS) as our IP value proposition. RaaS establishes more of a long-term, mutually beneficial partnership between the recruitment company and client.I am confident that the successful implementation of the RaaS strategy will help us to thrive and grow for another 10 years. During these increasingly disruptive times, the RaaS framework provides clients with a reliable pipeline of talent and RLC’s expert HR consulting services. I believe it is a more sustainable model – both for our firm, and our valued clients.My approach to optimisation is to combine the personal elements of great recruiting with new technologies that streamline the administrative aspects of the process. RLC will always aim to strengthen the human element of our business – not replace it. Plenty more innovations are in the pipeline – so keep watching this space! 10 Years of GratitudeI want to conclude this message with a massive ‘Thank You’: to everyone who has been a part of RLC’s journey. To the companies, job-seekers, and executives who trust RLC with their hiring needs and the future of their careers: I have so much appreciation for the clients and candidates who have partnered with us over the years, and I am grateful that so many of you have become lifelong friends.To the RLC team: recruiting consultants and staff, you are all responsible for making this company a success. I feel so much pride in the collaborative, innovative, and supportive work culture we have built together. You all make me look forward to arriving at the office every day. Together, we are working to establish a genuine game-changing model in the recruitment industry.  With such a great team alongside me, we can be certain of continued success!A special ‘Thank you’ goes out to Alex - my right hand in the revolution!And finally, I give thanks for my wife, without whom none of this would be possible. Her support and love makes me a better man, and positively contributes to every step I make.

View
Welcome to the new JacksonGrant. Designed for you.
Oct
25
Welcome to the new JacksonGrant. Designed for you.

JacksonGrant is pleased to announce the launch of our brand-new website! We have designed in carefully with both our clients and candidates in mind to offer better functionality and more valuable services. The new site is clean and easy to navigate, helping you find the information you’re looking for quickly and easily. We are also proud that it better represents who we are as a company and the level of service we offer as an experienced recruiter in Thailand’s booming manufacturing and supply chain sectors.New features for our clients As Thailand’s leading engineering and technical recruiter, we wanted to make it easier for hiring managers, business owners and client companies to find the talent they need to excel in the rapidly evolving world. As technology is becoming more and more fundamental to sophisticated business management and output in these sectors, they need talent solutions that are equally as cutting edge.Our new website allows you to find the right recruitment solution to suit your needs, and we provide detailed information on the Executive Search, Technology-Driven Recruiting, Outsourced Staffing and Project, Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) and RPO services we offer. You can also find information on the latest trends in recruitment and advice on how to keep your management and hiring capabilities working at the highest level in our news and insights page.Streamlined experiences for our candidatesWe know how hard our candidates work to grow their careers. JacksonGrant’s new website makes it easy for you to find and apply for roles in manufacturing, logistics and supply chain, infrastructure, life sciences, and digital technology industries across Thailand and Southeast Asia. Our new job search functionality lets you find the right role for you based on your industry expertise and you can also better access our personalised support features. Get in touch today to find out how we can act as a partner to your entire career. We also believe in supporting our candidates with up-to-date insights on what’s driving change in their industry and how they can better progress in their careers. Our blogs and insights page is also full of handy advice and tips on how to hone your skills, develop your CV and be interview ready as well as industry-specific trends you should be aware of. The highlights of JacksonGrant’s new website:Industry-specific pages focussed on the sectors you work in so candidates can find the perfect new roleDetailed breakdowns of the types of recruitment services we offer that shows exactly how we can help you develop the most effective staffing solution for your needsA regularly updated blogs page with the latest news and trends in Thailand’s recruitment industry as well as useful advice for both clients and candidatesMore information about the team behind JacksonGrant and what sets us apartWe will frequently be adding interesting content to the new website, including blog posts, vacancies, and newsYou can also follow us on social media such as LinkedIn, Facebook and TwitterLet us know if you like our new lookOnce you’ve had a chance to look through our new website, we’d be interested in hearing your thoughts – get in touch today.

View
How can JacksonGrant help you get a job?
Oct
11
How can JacksonGrant help you get a job?

Finding a new job can be time consuming and involve a lot of work. The average job search in Thailand takes around three to four months. That’s right, months! And if you are working full time whilst trying to find a new job it can be hard to find the time and energy to look through vacancies, fill out job applications and organise interviews. If you are thinking “I need help finding a job now” then you may have considered using a recruitment agency, like JacksonGrant. However, many job seekers are reluctant to use recruiters, either because they don’t know how to find a recruiter who works in their specialism, or they don’t know what services a recruiter can provide to jobseekers. Possibly they’ve used recruiters to hire before and feel uncomfortable on the other end of the process! How do recruiter’s work?Using a recruitment agency to find a job is simple. At JacksonGrant, we work directly with employers across Thailand in the manufacturing, logistics & supply chain, infrastructure, life sciences, and digital technology industries. This means we’re able to connect candidates quickly and easily with employers in those sectors. A recruiter is always paid by the employer, and often only when a position is filled, meaning using a recruiter won’t cost you anything. Once we have the details of the role the company is looking to fill, the job description, salary range, any benefits offered, the hard and soft skills needed, the start date and any other relevant information, we post the job and start reaching out to candidates who have submitted their CV to our database who we feel would be a good fit for the role.Our consultants will always sit down with you to talk about your career goals and aspirations so we’ll only ever send you roles that match your interests, skills, experience, and industry knowledge and that will help you advance your career.When you’ve had a chance to review the role, we will facilitate contact with the employer, set up any phone, video or face-to-face interviews needed and can even offer you advice, feedback, and support. Pros and cons of using a recruiter to find a jobNow you know how a recruiter like JacksonGrant works, what are the pros and cons of using a recruiter to help you find a job?Pros of using a recruiter in your job search:1.   They have industry expertiseRecruitment consultants often have first-hand experience of working in the industries they are recruiting for. At JacksonGrant, we have over a decade of experience working in the Thai manufacturing, engineering, and logistics sectors. This means we are aware of how they work, the current industry trends and what skills employers are looking for right now.2.   They have extensive connections Large networks and connections with leading employers mean recruiters can source jobs before they hit the jobs boards. Additionally, strong relationships with employers mean recruiters can put your CV to the top of the pile. 3.   They can help you land a role quickly A recruiter can help you manage your job search. If you’re applying for many roles, it can be hard to keep track of applications, interviews and whether you need to follow up. A recruiter can take care of this for you, giving you more time to polish your interview skills. Recruiters can also help target roles that you’d be perfect for, saving you from applying to large numbers of unsuitable jobs. This means finding your perfect role quickly and more efficiently. 4.   Good ones offer CV and interview advice Recruiters can offer your more than just access to jobs. At JacksonGrant we offer support and guidance on how to structure your CV, how to prepare for interviews and how to make the most of your skills and experience. We’ll also offer feedback post-interview and once you land your perfect job, we’ll check in to make sure your onboarding is going well.5.   They are genuinely invested in your successAt JacksonGrant we’re invested in your career. So, when you are ready to make that next career move, we’ll be able to provide you with support and advice. Developing an ongoing relationship with a recruiter can also be beneficial to your work if you work in HR, allowing you to transition from candidate to client.Cons of using a recruiter:1.   It can be hard to find the right recruiter for youWith so many recruiters operating in Thailand, it can be hard to find the right partnership for you. Don’t be afraid to do some research and ask questions to determine if a recruiter is a good fit.2.   They might match you to a job you don’t wantSome recruiters may be more invested in meeting quotas and tailoring CVs to their clients. If you are worried that your CV will be watered down, or you’ll be pushed for roles you don’t want, remember that you can always say no to an interview.  3.   They may try to undersell youPoor recruiters without in-depth knowledge of your industry may undervalue your skill set. Make sure you talk to specialist recruiters, such as JacksonGrant, who know your value in the current market. You’re never under an obligation to work with a specific recruiter so it doesn’t hurt to ask around, do your research and work with a recruiter who is a good fit for you.JacksonGrant can help you find your next role in the engineering and technical industries!Are you ready to take advantage of the current market and find your next role in the technical industries? Maybe you're looking to take on more responsibility and progress your career?There are many reasons to consider looking for a new job, why not check out our most recent vacancies and start your journey?Find your new role today.

View
Is Your CV Strong Enough to Secure Your Next Role? How to Improve Your CV
Sep
23
Is Your CV Strong Enough to Secure Your Next Role? How to Improve Your CV

Digital transformations and changes to the way businesses work across Thailand have deeply affected the skills and competencies employers are on the hunt for in candidates. Employers are looking for highly-skilled candidates with technical skills and competencies but what those technical skills involve is changing. Looking beyond technical ability, to be a top candidate you should also be demonstrating in-demand soft skills, emotional intelligence and inter-cultural sensitivity, to boost your resume.In-demand skills to boost your resumeFuture employers in the technical, engineering, manufacturing and logistics sectors in Thailand are looking for highly-motivated candidates with leadership abilities and a creative mindset. As a candidate, you need to be a well-rounded individual who not only has excellent technical ability but possesses strong soft skills too. Here are five of the top in-demand skills sought by employers in the current market you should be demonstrating :1. Leadership skillsHaving leadership ability is crucial if you are looking for senior level roles, however, they are also highly sought after by employers whatever your role. Employers are looking for individuals at every level who lead by example, foster a sense of community culture and are inspired by the company vision.There are leadership resources available, such as books and online courses, but you can take steps in your current role to practice your leadership skills. Put yourself forward to lead a project, find a leadership mentor, and practice active listening and problem solving.2. Intercultural intelligence Employers in the engineering and technical industries in Thailand are generally looking for candidates with a good, demonstrable English skills, particularly business English at senior levels to help to facilitate overseas business. But beyond an understanding of English top candidates demonstrating inter-cultural intelligence and empathy skills will be highly sought after. Intercultural intelligence is the ability to bridge cultural divides and avoid misunderstandings and miscommunications that may affect business outcomes. High levels of intercultural intelligence and empathy are crucial in today’s global business world. You can demonstrate intercultural intelligence to employers by discussing times you have worked cross-culturally and your experiences of other cultures.3. Self-motivationEmployers want candidates who are proven self-starters, who are passionate, motivated to take on tasks and who are willing to invest time in their own development. You can show this by being proactive in seeking out challenges and anticipating important tasks as well as demonstrating that you have independently worked on your skills.4. Innovation & creativity Businesses across the technological and manufacturing sectors are seeking candidates who can solve problems creatively and come up with innovative products and solutions. Broaden your knowledge, analyse products and applications you interact with daily and brainstorm solutions and ideas to improve them.5. Unlearning!In the modern business world change is rapid. Whether it is changes to market conditions, unforeseen global events or technological advances our skills can rapidly become outdated and replaced with new ways of working. Top candidates need to demonstrate that they are aware of advancements, keep on top of trends and have the ability to manage rapid transitions and new methodologies.You can show this in your CV by giving examples of new skills you have developed, that you are aware of industry trends and are active in your community and that you have experience of managing change and keeping teams aligned and moving forward in your current role.How to improve a CVBut how can you identify any areas where you need to upskill to ensure that you have the skills employers want? And how can you make sure your skills and abilities come across to hiring managers and employers?Take the following steps to ensure you have the skills employers want and that those skills are showcased in an eye-catching CV:Compare your current skills against industry requirementsTake a quick look at the descriptions and requirements for jobs similar to your current role, or for your dream position, and compare what employers are looking for with your skill set. You can also look at industry trends to see what skills will be in demand going forward. This will show you what skills you already have, any areas need to focus on and give you a benchmark of excellence to work towards.Identify areas you can upskill inOnce you know what skills are in high demand in your industry and where your current skills are sitting, you can prioritise areas you want to work on. You may not have the time or resources to address every skill at once but choose one or two to focus on.Customize your CV based on the job description It may seem time consuming to adjust your CV for every application you submit. But taking the time to pick out key phrases, competencies and power words from the job description will help your CV stand out and show you fully understand what the employer is looking for and how you fit that brief.Summarize your skills and key accomplishmentsThe average hiring manager spends 6-7 seconds looking at a resume. That’s right, seconds! This means you must get their attention quickly. Start your CV with a quick summary of your skills, technical abilities, and accomplishments to grab their attention. Make sure that you put any skills and keywords from the job description here too.Focus on resultsDon’t just list responsibilities. Emphasise your successes with quantifiable results and data. For example: Led a team of ten employees and implemented new work management software that led to an increase in efficiency and a 20% increase in sales revenue.  Highlight your personal developmentFocus on what you have learned from your past positions and show how you have advanced your skills and experience through self-motivated personal development. This shows your commitment to your development and willingness to learn new skills.Show your industry insight and connectionsDemonstrating that you are familiar with industry news, trends and changes will show employers you have industry knowledge and an interest in your sector. By showing your networking ability you show valuable communication skills.Find your next job in the technical industries with JacksonGrantAre you ready to take advantage of the current market and find your next role in the technical industries? Maybe you're looking to take on more responsibility and progress your career?There are many reasons to consider looking for a new job, why not check out our most recent vacancies and start your journey?Find your new role today.

View
6 Reasons Why Now Is the Time to Get A New Job in Thailand
Sep
16
6 Reasons Why Now Is the Time to Get A New Job in Thailand

If you’ve spent a fair amount of time in your current job, then you probably can’t imagine yourself working for another company. As time goes by, it becomes harder and harder for you to figure out when the right time is to make a switch in your career. However, taking the next step at the right time can lead you to increased compensation, greater career progression, and several other benefits. It's time to get a new job in Thailand!With that said, it can be hard to figure out when the “right time” is. For many people, the question of “should I stay, or should I go?” is one of the hardest questions they can answer. In this article, we’re going to help you determine if you should consider taking the next step in your career.When should you look for a new job? Six signs it’s time to find a new role:Determining whether or not it's time to take the next step in your career is hard. After all, having a stable job is very comfortable and comes with a lot of benefits, so why consider leaving in the first place? While that is a completely valid argument, there are times when you might need to look for a new job to bring yourself new career progression opportunities, a better working environment, and even a higher salary.So, if you feel like you’re on the edge and aren’t quite sure whether or not you should start looking for a new role, we have six signs that it’s time for you to start looking for a new job.1. Your current role lacks progression opportunitiesIt’s always important to look to the future and know what your next step is going to be. Making consistent steps in your career over the years is the key to reaching your professional goals. So, if you see that your current career doesn’t offer enough options for progression, that alone is a big sign that you should leave and seek a new role.This doesn’t mean that your current employer is bad. Rather, it means that you have given your employer everything you have to offer and it’s time for the next step forward. The consultants at JacksonGrant are experts in connecting candidates looking for development opportunities with employers that have a culture of investment in their employee’s and who offer excellent skills training.2. You're being paid less than you're worth in the current marketOne thing to keep in mind about the jobs market in Thailand is that it goes through constant changes - and that often impacts the salary professionals within their respective fields are compensated.If you’ve been working in your current role for a while, you are probably much better at your job but have also capped out your career progression within the company. And while that’s good - it doesn’t mean that you’re being paid what the current market can offer you.As a result of that, every now and again, it’s worth checking out the salary range that you could potentially secure in the current market, and if your current job isn’t paying as well, that is a big sign to start looking for a new role.3. You haven't learnt a new skill or technology in the last 6 monthsStagnation at the workplace is one of the worst phases an employee can ever go through. And if you haven’t learned a new skill or how to use a new piece of technology relevant to your industry recently - then you should probably leave your current employer and seek a new and more challenging working environment that will help you grow as a professional.If you are looking for roles in your industry that will challenge you and help you grow in your chosen profession then a specialist recruiter can help. At JacksonGrant our consultants listen to what you want, expect and need from your job role and use our industry connections and experience to match you with employers that offer exciting opportunities.4. Your current role disrupts your work-life balance causing stress or burnoutIt’s important to keep your work life and personal life in balance. If you believe that you can’t stop thinking about work and the job is becoming too stressful for you, you risk burning out. Burnout can lead to a lot of health problems and could be a sign that you need to take a step back and reconsider your career.Your job may have felt fine at the start. But if you were slowly given more responsibilities that are getting in the way of your personal life, then there’s nothing wrong with leaving your job for something better.5. Your skills are in high demand right nowIf you find that your skills are in-demand, there’s a high chance another employer would compensate you much better and offer better benefits in exchange for your skills compared to your current employer. As mentioned earlier, the job market is constantly changing, and if you’ve been in the same job for a while, it’s worth doing some research and seeing if the demand for professionals in your industry has increased. And if it has, that might be one sign that you should look for a new job.If you have skills that are in high demand from employers it can be difficult to sort through opportunities and find those most relevant to your skills, experience, and expectations. A specialist recruiter such as JacksonGrant can do that for you meaning you only spend time applying for roles that are right for you. 6. There are more opportunities to progress your career as technical industries expandSometimes, taking a step away from your current employer is the right decision if you want to progress. Manufacturing, engineering, digital, automotive and many other industries are on the rise right now in Thailand, which opens the doors to many different opportunities. And if you feel like you can succeed in these emerging industries, you might want to consider taking the next step in your career.What is the average time to find a new job?Even with all these emerging industries, it can take a while to find the right job. In our experience, it can take a person an average of three to six months to land a new job, even if they have the skills, experience, and qualifications for it.But there are ways to make it easier.Instead of finding all these companies and employers yourself, you can submit your qualifications and preferences to a recruiter. From there, the recruiter will find potential matches for you, so you won’t have to spend your time looking for your next job.Find your next job in the technical industries with JacksonGrantAre you ready to take advantage of the current market and find your next role in the technical industries? Maybe you're looking to take on more responsibility and progress your career?There are many reasons to consider looking for a new job, why not check out our most recent vacancies and start your journey?Find your new role today.

View
The Jobs Market is Changing in Thailand! It's Time to Think About Your Next Career Move
Sep
9
The Jobs Market is Changing in Thailand! It's Time to Think About Your Next Career Move

Every couple of decades, the jobs market goes through a cycle where we see a massive increase in demand for skilled workers in certain industries while other sectors see the opposite effect. That is exactly the trend that we are seeing in Thailand, which we expect will continue for many years to come.Advancements in modern technology, globalisation, and various other factors are pushing Thailand’s job market into unforeseen territory. And that’s great news for you as it could be the right time to think about your next career move.In this article, we’re taking a closer look at how Thailand’s job market is changing, the reasons behind the shift, and what this means for candidates looking to enter this new jobs market.5 Factors spurring recruitment in ThailandThere are many different factors that have played a crucial role in changing the job market in Thailand. In the section below, we will take a look at the top five.Rising demand for skilled candidatesAs companies all over Thailand grow and start moving towards the digital space, the need for skilled workers to fulfil the new unique needs of these companies rises, which in turn increases the demand for skilled candidates.Bear in mind, however, that increased demand doesn’t always translate to higher compensation or better progression – or even development! Business budgets and salary bandings are often fixed but monetary compensation is not all you can gain from a career shift. Consider whether the role in question is a “Learn” or “Earn” opportunity, both have value if you go in aware of what you’re getting out of the situation.Many may be hugely tempted to go for Earn rather than learn. However, skipping over an opportunity that offers you an investment in your skills and personal development for a higher wage package can mean pressure to deliver straight away. It is usually a safer option to look for those employers that want to put time and effort into your skills and growth and understand that everyone is on a learning curve.If you’re current role doesn’t offer any opportunity for growth, consider reaching out to a specialist recruiter like JacksonGrant who can help you identify and reach out to employers who have a culture of investment in their employee’s personal development. Increased interest from overseas businesses to set up in ThailandConnected to the point above, increased interest from overseas businesses to set up a manufacturing base or satellite office in Thailand has also increased the demand for skilled candidates. Organisations from the EU, US and UK are particularly interested in the wealth of manufacturing opportunities Thailand has to offer. This is great news for individuals that are skilled and experienced in the manufacturing industries who also have exceptional English language skills, as employers are keen on sourcing these skills.The unstoppable rise of digitalisationThe current jobs market is seeing a big shift into the digital world. Digitalisation has allowed skilled professionals from Thailand not only to work remotely for businesses in Thailand, but to also work for international clients from all over the world.This is arguably the biggest benefit to skilled candidates as they have a much wider choice for employment and are not restricted to their own town or city.Prioritisation of English and IT skillsAlong with digitalisation comes globalisation. The current Thai jobs market is focused on two main skills: English proficiency and IT. With the rise of technology, skilled IT workers are a huge priority for companies. Technological integration is a top priority for modern companies, which is why skilled IT professionals are a must-have for many different industries.And as we have already mentioned, companies are prioritising candidates with good English skills. Communication is key in this day and age, and employees need to be able to communicate with people in English since it’s one of the most widely spoken languages in the world.Candidates with in-demand skills might find it difficult to filter through large numbers of job roles to find those which are most relevant to them and their desired career path. This is where JacksonGrant’s specialist consultants can be vital in matching you with roles that suit your skills and experience and that offer you the next step in your career progression.Fluctuating unemployment for different age groups and sectorsTypically, mass fluctuation in employment rates for different age groups and sectors is very rare. However, that is exactly what we are seeing in Thailand, which has had a massive impact on the current job market.Such events typically happen in the event of global crisis, where businesses must remain shut, which forces workers from many different age groups and sectors out of work. We saw such a scenario during the pandemic, but other scenarios that can force such an event would be an economic crash and other unforeseen circumstances.What does this mean for candidates looking for a job in Thailand?A changing job market can be scary, but it can actually be a great opportunity - especially for workers that possess those in-demand skills. When the job market changes, it gives people the opportunity to adjust their plans and skills to better fit the market . That way, they have a higher chance of landing in-demand jobs that offer better pay and employment benefits.There’s no better time than now to start exploring the market for new opportunities and make a change in your career. Aside from the evolving job market, there are many modern technological advancements that make it easier for you to find a job in a new industry or even work for an employer from an entirely different country to Thailand.Find your next job in the technical industries with JacksonGrantAre you ready to take advantage of the current market and find your next role in the technical industries? Maybe you're looking to take on more responsibility and progress your career?There are many reasons to consider looking for a new job, why not check out our most recent vacancies and start your journey?Find your new role today.

View
Importance of Exclusivity for Passive-Candidate Recruitment
Apr
25
Importance of Exclusivity for Passive-Candidate Recruitment

Albert Einstein famously said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result. I’ve been seeing rising cases of insanity amongst employers in the recruiting world, by Einstein’s definition. Some companies continue to approach hiring in the same way: They always use multiple recruiters, and post on multiple job boards. They do not work in strategic partnership with their recruiter. I do not understand why these clients do not make changes to their process when things don’t go the right way. It just doesn’t make sense. Case in point: A client recently approached me because they need help filling a role that has been vacant for 4 months. This client came to me because they know I can find a suitable candidate; however, they would not commit to an exclusive recruiting agreement. I passed on the opportunity to work on this role, and the position is still open. Employers should understand that if you want to achieve recruitment goals in the current environment, exclusivity is a must. Personally, I cannot commit to a non-exclusive account anymore due to time constraints managing multiple business units. Nowadays, the most experienced consultants in the business can generally pick and choose the roles they will support clients on. Without a partnership agreement, you may struggle to find the correct solution to your hiring problem. Recruitment companies who accept a recruiting job without an exclusive agreement will almost certainly shuffle it off to a more junior consultant who lacks the gravitas to attract passive candidates – those in-demand professionals who aren’t necessarily looking to make a move. Run-of-the-mill agencies provide average candidates. What is an ‘average candidate’? They have weaker CVs, with questionable work histories. Average candidates have average motivation levels. Average candidates are the equivalent of low-hanging fruit: they are more likely to be approached by several potential employers and recruiters at once. If you’re not willing to work as an exclusive partner with a recruiter, you are probably going to be sorting through a pile of average candidates, because it takes extra effort from senior recruiters to find the most desirable passive candidates. Why are passive candidates more desirable? They are less likely to use your opportunity as a bargaining chip, because they are not looking at multiple opportunities. Passive candidates who have been recruited by an experienced headhunter are more loyal and discerning. As a senior consultant it is imperative that we understand candidate motivations, skill sets, and character. The opportunities we bring to passive candidates are more likely to be a perfect fit: which means it is more likely they can be enticed to leave their current position for a new opportunity. The best recruiters know and understand our clients and candidates more intimately. We understand human psychology, with an innate ability to read people. We have deeper insights into the market; some might even call it foresight. There are levels to the recruitment industry. If you want the most capable consultants to work on your behalf, exclusive partnership is a must. I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: The recruitment game is not about just finding the candidates anymore. Finding them is easy. Nowadays it’s more about courting and managing passive candidates, to convince them that joining your company is a winning move. If you are not getting the right candidates for your company, do you at least understand why? HR managers who are not achieving the desired level of success need to ask themselves: Are you listening to feedback and following your recruiter’s advice? Have you given your recruitment agency an exclusive agreement? Without exclusivity, consultants don’t have the incentive to pull out all the stops and approach those prized passive candidates.

View
5 Tips, How to Get the Best Results from a Recruitment Partner
Feb
22
5 Tips, How to Get the Best Results from a Recruitment Partner

We are seeing a massive influx of jobs that need to be filled in the first quarter of 2022, and I do not see this trend slowing down anytime soon. This means that candidates have more choices, increasing their power and leverage in the marketplace. Now, more than ever, it is essential for companies with staffing needs to have a long-term strategic recruitment partner. With the job market in a state of flux, these 5 tips will help you to get the best out of a recruitment agency, and ensure that you are receiving a true value for the money invested.1. FlexibilityMy clients often tell me that that traditional big recruitment agencies are just not getting the job done anymore. One of the greatest benefits of working with a boutique agency like JacksonGrant is that we provide a more customised service to fit your specific needs.This customised service includes a more hands-on approach: flexible terms, adapting recruitment methods (one size does not fit all), a more tailored way of presenting candidates, and a more personalised style. In a word, flexibility.With a more flexible approach, JacksonGrant provides a more innovative solution for your hiring needs2. Deeper Market InsightsIf your preferred candidate declines a position with your company, do you know the reason why?Do you understand the latest salary market trends?Are you searching for a candidate with a highly technical, specialised skill set that is hard to find?Do you want to know what your competition is doing to get the inside track?By working with a trusted recruitment partner like JacksonGrant, you will get answers to all these questions.Bigger recruitment companies often struggle to provide this sort of detailed intel due to the sheer volume of work they take on, and because of a bureaucratic culture with various levels of seniority that must be navigated in order to do business. A smaller firm will spend more time working face-to-face with their clients: this is why we deliver more valuable intelligence.3. Core ValuesAt JacksonGrant,our core values are Integrity, Innovation, and Reliability.We are always forthright and transparent with our clients about the searches we conduct on their behalf. If a client wants to know how we executed a search, we will share all of our related market intelligence.We provide upfront feedback about any challenges we encounter; we don’t shy away from uncomfortable truths.We won’t walk away from an assignment if it becomes more difficult than anticipated. Instead, we collaborate more deeply with our clients to overcome any hurdles that arise, and implement necessary changes. This nimble approach is the great advantage of working with small-to-midsize agencies. Nobody gets it right 100 percent of the time: we are pleased whenever a client shares constructive criticism, so we can improve and evolve.4. Personal TouchAs previously mentioned, at JacksonGrant we love to add a personal touch to what we do. As consultants, of course it is important to share resumes with our clients — but equally important, we provide valuable feedback.We routinely provide our clients and partners with detailed recommendations on company fit, potential culture clashes, guidance on compensation packages, transparent timelines, and onboarding assistance.5. Going Beyond RecruitmentAt JacksonGrant, we aim to become our clients’ trusted partner. To do this we go beyond traditional recruitment support, with a broad spectrum of HR Consultancy services.This includes Payroll, Outsourcing, Training, Consultancy, Workforce Management tools, Innovative Learning Platforms, Blue Collar Technology Hiring Tools, 360 PDPA compliant Referencing Tools, Legal Guidance and more. To learn more please check out our website at www.jacksongrant.io

View