Talent. Optimised.

Find your next role or hire with the leading engineering and technical recruitment agency in Thailand.

Talent. Optimised.

Find your next role or hire with the leading engineering and technical recruitment agency in Thailand.

Talent. Optimised.

Find your next role or hire with the leading engineering and technical recruitment agency in Thailand.

Why
choose us?

JacksonGrant is an engineering and technical recruitment specialist experienced in supporting companies and candidates in Thailand's booming manufacturing and supply chain sectors.

Whether you are simply expanding your team, hiring for short-term projects, ongoing partnerships or recruiting for executive and leadership roles, we offer a range of recruitment approaches customised to suit your requirements. Our innovative recruitment technology, consultancy resources, digital tools and revolutionary Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) model enable us to work in partnership with you to craft a bespoke recruitment solution that best meets your needs.

If you're based locally or are an overseas organisation looking to break into the Thai markets, we can find high-quality candidates who are knowledgeable in international and local engineering, supply chain, manufacturing, infrastructure, life sciences and digital & technology industries.

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AESC logo
Mercedes
Ford
DB Schenker
Rhenus Logistics
Accenture
Line
Johnson&Johnson
DKSH
Continental
Lumentum
Grab
Stanley
Schneider Electric
Valeo
PCS
Rhenus Logistics Co., Ltd.

JacksonGrant understands the logistics business. The company’s excellent network and consultative approach has ensured it is a vital business partner for our growth in Thailand & SE Asia. JacksonGrant’s groundbreaking RaaS solution has revolutionised our talent acquisition strategy. Having ongoing access to the full range of the JacksonGrant team’s experience means we can always get the right solution.

East-West Seed International Limited

I have been working with JacksonGrant both as a candidate and a client.

JacksonGrant has a distinctive approach to executive search: they strive to understand both the client’s and candidates’ cultures, expectations and motivations by establishing a close personal relationship with all parties. JacksonGrant genuinely cares for a mutually beneficial outcome. Besides, I was personally always impressed by the follow up post placement. I warmly recommend JacksonGrant as a very reliable and professional partner in executive search.

Cushman & Wakefield Services (Thailand) Co., Ltd.

Since becoming our approved recruitment partner, JacksonGrant has has consistently impressed me with their holistic approach to recruitment and HR support. The consultants are always quick to respond and their specialist understanding of our industry ensures we were able to quickly hire candidates with the right fit for our business. JacksonGrant ask the right questions and look to add value at every stage of the process.

It is my pleasure to recommend JacksonGrant to any company looking for professional recruitment support in Thailand.

Lumentum International (Thailand) Co., Ltd.

As our company grows in Asia and especially in Thailand, it has been a true customer experience to work with JacksonGrant whilst going through the process of searching, filtering and appointing a senior executive.

JacksonGrant was able to quickly understand our needs very precisely, mainly because of their experience and practical understanding of the roles. We have a very successful partnership with JacksonGrant on all our professional opportunities in line with our strategy of growth.

JacksonGrant is able to take a lot of the heavy lifting from our shoulders to allow us to focus on the needs of the business in order to get the right mix of talent either locally or from their worldwide network.

As we move forward in our growth model, JacksonGrant will be in step with us, advising and supporting our challenges in executive recruitment.

Stanley Black & Decker Inc

JacksonGrant has helped Stanley Black & Decker fill several key engineering positions in Thailand over the last few years. JacksonGrant’s attention to detail, their understanding of our business needs and their access to excellent candidates has made them a key partner to the development and growth of our business.

DB Schenker

I have worked with JacksonGrant for a number of years and during this time they have successfully identified several key people for our company from middle management to executive Country & Cluster leadership

As one of the leading global logistics providers, we require employees with a combination of multicultural skillsets, languages and attitudes. JacksonGrant’s network of local Thai and expatriate logistics professionals in SE Asia is exceptional and allows them to access candidates with specific technical skillsets when required. They are experts in their field and this market knowledge empowers their recruitment support.

JacksonGrant has a very personal and friendly approach to business and offer a supportive, motivating and highly professional service. I would have no hesitation in recommending them to others looking for recruitment support.

Datapath Ltd

We have worked with JacksonGrant for recruiting senior sales roles to cover Southeast Asia, our engagements are always smoothly and successfully executed.

On each occasion, JacksonGrant impressed us with their responsiveness, professionalism, speed, pragmatism, transparency, and general ‘ease of working together’ throughout the process – from understanding our business and our target candidate profile, identifying and introducing appropriate candidates, arranging interviews and ‘backchannel’ liaising with candidates, and appropriately advising on expectations and next best steps. 

I would not hesitate to work with JacksonGrant for any future recruitment needs, and can confidently recommend JacksonGrant to anyone seeking recruitment services in the region.

KSB Pumps CO. Ltd.

I have worked with JacksonGrant for over eight years, whilst leading two different technology companies. Throughout this time, JacksonGrant has demonstrated experience and domain knowledge from support staff to front line technical and commercial leadership. We look forward to continuing a long-term partnership with JacksonGrant.

Diversey Holdings, Ltd.

When operating in the Thailand job market with 0.5% unemployment rates and millennials dominating the work space, having a reliable recruitment partner is paramount to the success of any business. That’s what we found in JacksonGrant. 

JacksonGrant spent time understanding the nuances of our business and the requirements for each job and they were able to provide us with good quality candidates, almost instantly. This is especially true for mid to senior level jobs. It’s a pleasure working with this team that blossoms everyday under Richard’s leadership.

Optimise the Talent
You Need

We can support your hiring through Executive Search or Tech-Driven recruitment, Project, RPO and RaaS, as well as Outsourced Staffing services. Our tailored approach considers your business strategy and requirements and matches it with our in-depth industry expertise to provide the right consultant, service and the best outcomes for you.

Attract, retain, and develop the best talent with JacksonGrant and ensure your business is primed for success.

Start your
recruitment journey

At JacksonGrant the attitude and culture of our people is our top priority. We are competitive but collaborative, professional yet personable and everyone has a voice and can make a genuine impact on our business. Our position in the market means you will be working in an exciting, fast-paced, and international company that provides the highest level of service to our client partners.

Everyone in our team, whether they are experienced recruiters or just starting out in the business, is offered the opportunity to learn and grow their skills through tailored learning development. Graduate consultants will be given the opportunity to help high-quality manufacturing, engineering and logistics candidates realise their potential, and experienced recruiters will get exposure to some of the leading employers in Thailand who are building the future of our world.

Career &
hiring insights

JacksonGrant Special Projects: Management Trainee Recruitment
JacksonGrant Special Projects: Management Trainee Recruitment
Feb
6

When clients are faced with a unique HR challenge that requires special expertise, it’s my job to find a solution.Recently, one of our most important clients needed help finding talented young professionals for their management trainee programme. It was a big assignment, and a difficult one: we were asked to find 100 promising trainees with management potential – and we had only two months to do it.A High-Priority Project, for a High-Profile ClientThe client is a global food retailer and wholesale F&B distributor, a household brand recognised around the world. JacksonGrant enjoys a very close and trusted relationship with this client. We have an exclusive agreement to do all their recruiting in Thailand. Because this is such a valuable client, I was feeling the pressure to succeed!First Step: Build A Talent PoolThe client wanted management trainee candidates under 26 years old, with a university education. They could be based anywhere in Thailand. To be considered, candidates must be able to work upcountry and be willing to travel up to six days per week. I assigned five junior JacksonGrant recruiters to work on this project as a team. We started our search by looking for recent graduates with no more than four years of experience. We had to identify candidates with clear management potential. Casting a Wide Net My team started gathering resumes for the talent pool with an intensive social media search, using apps like LinkedIn, JobsDB, JobtopGun, and JobThai. We posted advertisements, and pulled resumes from electronic databases. Soon we had a pile of CVs from 2,000 candidates. To narrow it down, we spoke personally to everyone on the list. Each recruiter on my team made 50 phone calls per day for an entire week. After these preliminary interviews, 1,200 candidates made it through to the testing phase of the selection process. Testing & EvaluationBefore management trainee candidates could be interviewed by the client, they must first pass an online aptitude test and a psychological profile evaluation. We needed to find trainees who met the client’s criteria for technical knowledge and education. Successful candidates also needed to fit a certain psychological profile, because the trainees would be groomed for management positions in the future. Our client needed us to identify young people who would be likely to stay with the company for the long-term, to make it worth the significant investment in their training and development. Only 30 percent of the 1,200 candidates passed the aptitude test and psychological evaluation. Around 400 trainee candidates made it though to the client interview stage of the process.InterviewsNow we had a short list of 400 candidates who met the client’s management training programme criteria. These short-listed candidates were invited to the client’s HR assessment centre. They spent a day participating in group sessions and work project simulations, to evaluate their problem-solving abilities and leadership potential, and observe how they work as a team.The trainee candidates who passed the client’s HR assessment made it to the final cut: the client interview. The client’s HR team and senior management conducted final interviews to identify the best leaders, who also possess entrepreneurship qualities, and the right attitude to fit in with the company’s culture. The final decisions were made by senior management. Mission AccomplishedI was really proud to lead my team through this project to a successful conclusion. It was a big challenge, with high stakes. We spent two months working very closely together on this project; my team is more close-knit and efficient now. It was great experience for my junior recruiters.Evaluating who will be a prospective long-term employee, with management potential is rigorous and time-consuming. The selection process was very tough, and extremely thorough. Only the most dedicated, patient, determined candidates made it to the final cut. It was not easy to find candidates who could pass the initial screening, so we had to continually widen the scope of our search.It is super-challenging to find the right psychological profile for a management trainee; because in today’s workplace, young people are not necessarily looking to stay at the same job for five-to-ten years, especially early in their careers. That was probably the most difficult part of this recruitment project.The successful candidates are now working with the company, training for a six-month trial period. If they are successful, they will be offered a full-time contract of employment. The management trainees start from zero, and work their way up, getting to know all the different roles that they will one day oversee as managers and executives.Job SatisfactionOur big client is happy with their trainees. We’ve received feedback that our candidates were of high quality, and they are doing well in their probationary period of training. They plan to continue this programme every year, with management trainees needed for logistics, engineering, and supply chain divisions. In fact, we’re already identifying candidates for the next management trainee programme. If you, or someone you know is interested, you may apply here or Management_trainee@jacksongrant.io Does your company have a recruitment challenge that is too big for your internal HR department to handle on their own? Let’s talk about how outsourcing your recruitment needs to JacksonGrant can be a win-win for everyone involved. Please feel free to me here or email me at sureeporn@jacksongrant.io

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How to recruit your leaders with ED&I in mind in engineering, manufacturing and supply chain
How to recruit your leaders with ED&I in mind in engineering, manufacturing and supply chain
Jan
30

Equality, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) in business is a hot topic around the world. There are many advantages for your business in having a more diverse and inclusive workforce. Diverse businesses are more productive, more innovative, and ultimately more profitable. Being more inclusive can also help you attract and retain employees with sought-after skills and experience. But some industries are less diverse than others and some groups, particularly women, face difficulties in reaching senior leadership positions because of this in Thailand.There is good news! Thailand currently ranks 79th out of 146 countries in the World Economic Forum’s 2022 Gender Gap Report. In 2020 the WEF estimated that by the end of the year women would make up roughly 35% of top management positions in firms and 16% of representatives in parliament. Those figures have been supported by the fact that Thailand is now one of ten countries in East Asia and the Pacific which have seen an increase in the share of women in senior positions such as legislators, officials, and managers. Our own efforts have contributed significantly to this development as 52% of our placed candidates in 2022 were female.4 leadership hiring techniques to promote diversity when hiring in ThailandDeveloping strategies to improve equality, inclusion, and diversity in the ways we hire often leads to an increase in the numbers of diverse entry-level candidates. However, promoting diversity in leadership requires a unique approach.If we want to create equal-opportunity recruitment strategies for senior leadership positions, we need to create a workplace where highly-qualified candidates from diverse backgrounds want to develop and grow their careers. Here are four leadership hiring techniques you can employ:1. Make ED&I a company priorityPlacing ED&I strategies and initiatives at the core of your company values and mission is attractive to high-quality leadership candidates. A survey by the Boston Consulting Group found that South East Asian employees saw a correlation between diversity and competitiveness yet only 58% of those surveyed said that their employers had established formal diversity and inclusion programmes compared with 96% globally. Committing to making ED&I a priority, rewarding work on diversity initiatives, and communicating your commitment in your employer branding can position you as an employer that values inclusion.2. Encourage internal talentWhen a leadership position becomes available in an organisation the default choice can often be to hire an external candidate. However, that can lead to talented people within your company being overlooked for promotion despite possessing the skills and experience you need. Looking internally and even considering moving personnel horizontally from other teams and departments can be a cost-effective and efficient way to encourage diverse viewpoints and champion diverse talent. Putting in place mentorship programmes and offering leadership training to high-potential employees can help you nurture internal talent.3. Improve diversity in mid-level rolesTo ensure you have enough internal candidates available for leadership positions, it’s important to improve diversity when hiring lower down the ladder, particularly in mid-level roles. Unconscious bias, where hiring managers and interviewers form opinions about candidates based on their gender, ethnicity or age, can make the process unfair and result in your business missing out on talented individuals. Standardising your recruitment process for all roles, working to eliminate unconscious bias when hiring and considering accessibility and flexibility in your hiring process can help you attract diverse talent. Explore new talent pools and consider ways you can bring talent into the sector. For example, re-entry programmes can help women return to the workforce following maternity leave. Follow this diversity hiring checklist:Remove biased language from job descriptionsRethink what your ideal candidate looks likeUse blind recruitment methodsSeek out diverse candidates and talent poolsUse your employee networks for referralsOffer internships or mentorships to diverse groupsUse your employer brand to show the diversity of your organisation4. Develop a culture of inclusion A culture of inclusion goes a long way to increasing retention and, most importantly, encouraging diverse candidates to develop their career with you long enough to grow into leadership roles. 57% of employees would consider leaving their current employer to join a more inclusive organisation.Employee Resource Groups, mentorship schemes, re-entry programmes and other support systems can help you build inclusivity into the culture of your organisation. It can be important here to get feedback from your employees and respond to that feedback to improve inclusion efforts.Close the gender gap in manufacturing and supply chain leadership with JacksonGrantIf you are looking for help in promoting female leadership and in attracting and retaining diverse candidates, we can help. We specialise in finding exceptional talent for the manufacturing, engineering, and supply chain industries in Thailand and have the reach and network to source the right diversity of qualified candidates for your organisation.Set up a free consultation with one of our consultants or submit a vacancy today.

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New Year Reflections on the Recruitment Industry: How Much Has Really Changed?
New Year Reflections on the Recruitment Industry: How Much Has Really Changed?
Jan
30

At the beginning of a new year, we have a natural tendency to reflect on where we’ve been, where we’re at, and where we’re going.30 Years in the Recruiting BusinessI’ve been in the recruitment business for 30 years now; I started out in 1992.My first recruiting job was in the UK. I was assigned to work the IT sector. It was a run-of-the-mill agency that focused on permanent job recruitment. I went in with absolutely no experience. Those were the days before email, before the internet, when recruitment was done entirely over the phone and in-person. every person for themselvesIt was an aggressive, sales-driven office culture. We had stand-up desks, and it was a noisy, hectic, wide-open environment. It was every person for themselves, standing up all day shouting into the phone, except when you went to a private room to interview candidates. Success was based on your ability to forge and maintain strong relationships with clients and candidates. That remains the case today, despite all the changes we’ve experienced in technology and the global economy.The Telephone Era Back then we were on the phone all day (and night) because there was no other way to find stuff out. We spent all day talking to people – that was how we conducted research. You couldn’t log on to a computer and google the top 15 companies in a particular industry. The only way to get accurate information from reliable sources was by consulting with a small handful of people who had a unique industry perspective and inside information. Everything was analog. We’d sort through big files of CVs, page by page. It was a raw industry. There were no digital tools, no guidelines; you’d just do whatever you could with the resources at hand to close a deal.The Internet Disrupts Search and ResearchThe advent of the internet changed the search part of a recruiter’s job. The evolution of job boards and social media networks means we can now identify and profile candidates easily. Today, instead of barking on the phone, pacing back and forth, I see recruiters spending a lot of time seated at their desks, using their laptops electronic devices to look at databases and scroll through social media tools like Linkedin and job boards like JobsDB.com.Digital technology makes mass communication easy. With email and social network apps, it is no longer necessary to make 100 phone calls each day. The internet allows headhunters to recruit by remote. I spent six years of my career recruiting for jobs in Tokyo; all that time I was based in Bangkok. The More Things Change, the More they Stay the SameThere is no denying the massive benefits of internet technology. But strong relationship-building skills are still the hallmark of a successful recruiter.For example, if I do not understand my clients’ business and office culture intimately, I won’t be able to find a candidate who is the perfect fit.We’ve got to know our job candidates closely as well. When people change jobs, the decision generally has something to do with changes in their life situation: a child on the way, a move to another city, a divorce. A recruiter needs to understand this as well: sometimes it’s about more than just matching skillsets with a resume. Without a profound understanding of the people you are dealing with, it is very difficult to do a good job as a recruiter. It is not enough to just find somebody a job, or fill a position for your client. We need to find people the right jobs, so they can settle in and be happy long-term.Specialisation is a PrerequisiteNowadays, recruiters need to specialise in a particular industry sector. Because if you’re going to have a comprehensive understanding of your clients and candidates, you must understand their business – the trends, the technology, the jargon.For example, I need to know what companies across the logistics sector are doing, in order to help the companies I am working for in the most effective way. Likewise, I won’t have the gravitas required to earn a candidate’s trust if I am not also an expert in the field who can speak their language. The best candidates get approached form all directions now. There are so many recruiters buzzing in their ears, the only way I can stand out and get their attention is if I have real industry expertise. ESG: More Important Than EverThe competition to hire the most qualified, capable candidates is tight in today’s market. Elite candidates know this, and they are more discerning about what company’s they will consider working for.Take interviews, for example. Before, an interview was essentially one-way traffic: a company representative looks at a candidate’s resume, asks a series of questions. If the candidate gives satisfactory answers and is technically qualified, they’ll probably be offered the job.The balance of power has shifted recently. Now, interviews are just as much about the candidate asking questions of the employer as vice-versa.ESG issues have become important to job seekers, especially those who are in demand. If a recruiter wants to attract the best candidates in today’s market, they need to understand shape and flavour of the company they are recruiting for. To close a deal with mediocre talent, it often doesn’t take more than a modest salary raise. But if your client demands top talent, the office culture and company values must be a strong match: elite talent cares as much or more about ethics, diversity, and environmental standards, as the job description and salary.Reputation is KingAs a recruiter I need to be careful with the clients I represent: if I work for a company that has a reputation as a polluter, or as has a poor track record in terms of labour disputes, it reflects poorly on me. Reputation is king in this business.The reputation of a recruiter is important not only in terms of expert knowledge and industry specialization. We also need to know enough about the industry and the major players in the sector to know which companies are the best brands to work for. If I have a shoe store, I need to stock the best shoes, the most popular brands that people want to wear, the ones that represent a certain status, or lifestyle, or values. Similarly, as a recruiter, I need to partner with and represent great companies, if I want to succeed. Even with advanced technology, the reputation and character of the recruiter is often the most important element for closing a placement. The best candidates are only going to listen to an approach from a recruiter who is knowledgeable; who will take the time to understand and get to know them personally; who will talk sincerely, and help them find the best opportunities. The internet is a phenomenal resource. The benefits for doing business are undeniable. But it also generates a lot of noise that we struggle to cut through. Like any other business or shop with a presence on the internet, a recruiter needs to be perceived as having a unique brand. He or she must have excellent reviews and high ratings. When a candidate lands on your LinkedIn profile, they want to see that you are connected to the right people. Like everyone else in the information age, recruiters are under a microscope in a way they never used to be.In the old days, I simply needed to be as good a salesman as possible, and to get the best information available from industry sources. Now I need to be a marketeer, with a social media presence that builds my own unique brand. The Future of RecruitmentIf I can make one prediction about the future of the business, it is this: The days of contingency recruitment are numbered.Contingency recruitment does not suit the nature of the industry. It is unfairly priced for all parties involved. The average success rate for contingency recruiting is 20 percent. This makes contingency recruiting a free-for-all: the client ends up paying a big fee, because agencies price their commissions at high levels to make up for the majority of work done on placements that they ultimately do not get paid for.The contingency model at JacksonGrant is gradually being replaced by Recruitment as a Service (RaaS). RaaS is a subscription model that gives a company greater flexibility. For a monthly fee, clients can access the full breadth of an agency’s resources as they see fit. RaaS allows for a true partnership between recruiter and client, because the interests of both parties are more closely aligned.I see lots of recruitment companies around the globe shifting to RaaS. It is undoubtedly the future of recruitment. It benefits candidates, our clients pay less, and it encourages recruiters to develop expertise and specialisation to work more intimately with clients. This in turn leads to greater credibility with candidates. It is a win-win for everybody.If you’d like to learn more about how JacksonGrant’s RaaS subscription model can help your company attract the best talent, I’m happy to have that conversation: please reach out to me here.

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JacksonGrant Recruitment is not all Champagne and Roses
JacksonGrant Recruitment is not all Champagne and Roses
Jan
24

It is likely that this is the most honest and vulnerable article that I have or will ever write. Although many people have congratulated me on my success, it comes at a price, and I must make more sacrifices if I wish to develop further. After writing this I realise that: a) This is a pretty lengthy piece; and b) It will likely require a Part Two. For ease of reference, I have broken the article into the following sections:● Work-Life Balance● Winding Down● Relationship● Health ● Friendships● Imposter Syndrome and Self-Doubt● Management ● Disappointment● Self-Branding● Partnership● Candidate ManagementDeep breath, let's get started!Work-Life BalanceWhat's that! I honestly can't remember the last time I packed up at the end of the day and was able to relax. As well as living almost 50km from the office, I usually do recruitment work or respond to emails when I am at home. A successful recruitment consultant is not a 9-to-5 job in my opinion; if someone knows a way, please share with me. To then manage and lead a company, well there aren't enough hours in the day. I would advise those who wish to become recruiters to make sacrifices and add some time to their week outside of office hours when they are willing to do additional work. Although I cannot or would not force anyone to do this, I simply don't think you can be successful without putting in the extra effort. I must stress here: you can be successful working a 9-5, I just don’t know how. You also need to make time for face to face engagements with clients and candidates and this often has to be outside of office hours.Winding DownIt is often impossible for me to do this. At the end of the day there are so many balls to juggle my brain refuses to switch off and I struggle to sleep. It really is hard to let go. As I can't turn off my brain, I can't sleep as my mind is constantly thinking of things to do the next day.RelationshipI got married almost 3 years ago and whereas my wife and I are very happy there is an incredible strain on my relationship due to the business I am in. Luckily my wife is also a workaholic and often works 7 days a week. In fact, she makes me feel lazy. As a result of her hard work, she is becoming a very successful businesswoman. We are at the stage where we are planning a family – to be honest, when you get home at the end of the day and it's the magic time to make babies, it often doesn't feel like the timing is right. HealthWow, where do I start? At the beginning of 2022 I was weighing in at a hefty 92.5 kg (14.5 stone) and something needed to give. I was lucky to find a personal trainer to help me, and since I started training in late March, I have reduced my weight to 85kg. I still have a poor diet which is the result of not wanting to cook after a long day, and taking the chance when I can find the time to stuff my face. I am aware my eating habits are not conducive to good health, but needs must. My hair! My ex-colleagues in the government in the UK will say I always had a 50p sized hole in the back of my head but now you can probably fit in a few in a couple of pounds’ worth. I have grayed at the sides – and let's not mention the wrinkles. My doctor says I am close to acute stress and need to manage this carefully. I have conducted personality tests which have shown I have an above average level of resilience, but I don't want to drop dead of a heart attack one day.FriendshipsI have severely neglected my circle of friends in Thailand and the ones in the UK are almost non-existent, bar a few. My job involves talking, communicating, socialising and generally being good with people; and it's draining. I am not shy or introverted, but when socialising is part of the job, you also need some downtime. Imposter Syndrome & Self-DoubtAs a child I was raised in a wonderful family that was very much working class. I grew up in a tough city. Although not involved myself in violence, drugs and crime, it was a part of daily life. I wasn't the best educated, as I worked from a young age to provide the material trappings I thought I needed. I was always taught by my father that I didn't have to be the smartest, I just had to outwork people, and this is a principal which has led to becoming a partner in my company.That said, I do suffer from imposter syndrome. My accent and language are not the most polished; and whereas I have fantastic manners (thanks mum), I am not the most cultured. In my role negotiating with CEO's and MD's who are much more educated and higher class than me it can lead to self-doubt. It took me a long time to come to terms with this. ManagementBy far the hardest part of my job is being a manager and leader: the reason, simply put, is people. Without people (your staff), you are nothing. Nothing prepared me for being a manager in Thailand and the intimate details that you learn about their lives. I share the burden of their stresses to support them; to a large extent I need to be selfless. As a person who admittedly can be selfish at times, this is a really tough challenge. I had to make the transition from being a top biller, to being a top manager who can still bill high while enabling others to become high billers too; it's a completely different job description. On top of this, you need to have clear boundaries: whereas I would like to be closer friends with my staff, to maintain professionalism, I just can't. DisappointmentAs a recruiter, we are never the masters of our own destiny. As a recruiter you need to take criticism with a smile, disappointment with a shrug, and rejection as the norm. Failure to do so will result in the collapse of your career. At my company I strive always to provide the best service. I see recruitment as a complex puzzle to solve. Sometimes you fail, and when the stakes are high, it really hurts. I remember the first big deal I lost. I stupidly counted the commission before the deal was done and was planning all the lovely things, I was going to treat myself to. That was a mistake I have never repeated. I always educate my staff that we really don't matter in the grand scheme of things. We are a conduit to make things happen, and we can celebrate in the background.Self-Branding This is something I have been teased and ridiculed on now for a few years and again it stings. I realize the importance of branding and social media and I do think sometimes the recruitment industry overdoes it. I’ll let you in on a secret: we aren't posting to flaunt our successes; we are using social media as a tool to attract the best recruiters out there. Hiring is a big challenge, especially because we are trying to find consultants that want to grow and challenge themselves. PartnershipWorking closely with Richard is tough. For those that know him he is a no-nonsense, workaholic who demands the very best. He will not ask people to do anything he wouldn't do himself –as the Managing Director he is our leader. He is certainly my role model and coach and I have immense thanks and gratitude for him making me his partner – but that doesn't always mean we see eye to eye. We have had shouting matches that I probably lost, but what keeps us working together is that no grudges are held, we shake hands at the end of a heated discussion, and he is always right (I say that tongue in cheek).Candidate ManagementCandidate relationships are massively important but sometimes it is impossible to speak to everyone that wants to talk to you. I receive a lot of messages and emails asking for consultations, but there are only so many hours in the day. I hate disappointing people, but as my role grows it is becoming nearly impossible to keep up with the demand. Without candidates, however, my role is redundant, so I try to meet as many as humanly possible. If you found value in this piece, I am happy to follow up with a Part 2. For all other communications you can reach me on LinkedIn, or email at alexander@jacksongrant.ioPublished: 24 January 2022

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Our predictions for 2023 recruitment trends in Thailand
Our predictions for 2023 recruitment trends in Thailand
Jan
20

Recruitment in Thailand has been an exciting place to be over the past year. While challenges and opportunities were available to Thai businesses, with increasing digitalisation and advancements in technology, and globalisation, a shortage of skilled candidates made it a challenging market. We’ve discussed how those changes affected jobseekers looking to move roles, but here’s how 2022 shaped the recruitment market for employers in Thailand.Big trends affecting recruitment in Thailand last year1. Global crises caused fluctuating employment ratesThe global economy continued to experience shocks in 2022. Supply chain difficulties and the increasing costs of energy have slowed recovery in the manufacturing and engineering sectors, among others. This has meant different sectors continue to experience fluctuations in employment levels with tech recovering quickly – unsurprisingly - as other sectors struggle.2. Increasing interest from overseas businesses Thailand offers a wealth of opportunities for businesses from the manufacturing, supply chain and engineering sectors. The favourable conditions have attracted interest from large international corporations from the UK, EU and US and is fuelling demand for candidates in those sectors with high-level English skills and who are a good cultural fit.3. Widespread consequences of digitalisation Digital technologies are impacting all areas of business in Thailand. The increasing digitalisation of the economy has allowed skilled candidates to work remotely and attracted an influx of international businesses to Thailand in 2022. It is also behind the increasing demand for digital, IT and technical skills from all businesses.Our predictions for recruitment trends in 2023Many of these factors will be prevalent as we head into 2023. But there are several emerging trends that we predict will have a huge impact on how recruiting in engineering, supply chain and manufacturing may change in 2023. Here are our top five recruitment trends to look out for:1. An even greater focus on ED&I in leadership rolesLarge multinational companies operating in Thailand are extremely aware of the importance of strong Equality, Diversity & Inclusion (ED&I) policies. Companies that embrace gender diversity amongst leadership teams are more competitive and more profitable than those that don’t. Not to mention diverse companies are more attractive to younger workers with 47% of millennials looking for ED&I commitments from their employers. 2. Recession does not necessarily mean fewer opportunitiesA dichotomy is emerging between those businesses who are anticipating a recession and those who are experiencing significant growth in their fields. Those who are experiencing growth are open to entering new regions and markets. Thailand is especially attractive to overseas manufacturing and engineering businesses seeking to expand or relocate.Opportunities to hire talent in such a market are high as skilled candidates may be looking to transfer from industries and businesses who are struggling.3. Candidates with technical skills will continue to be highly sought after Technical and digital skills will remain in high demand. It is estimated that there are 10 million manufacturing roles currently unfilled due to a lack of technically-skilled candidates. As a result, employers are on the lookout for candidates with easily transferable skillsets who can be brought in from other industries. The digitalisation and transformation of the Thai manufacturing, engineering, and logistics sectors means leaders in those industries will be looking for candidates with cyber security, Cloud, IT infrastructure and project management skills.4. An escalating need for English skills Thailand is an attractive destination for foreign investors and international businesses thanks to solid economic growth, tax breaks for companies relocating to Thailand and government support for manufacturing and digital businesses. With Thailand as a commercial focal point in South-East Asia, demand for employees with proficiency in English remains high. 5. Employers must focus on retentionAs employers struggle to recruit candidates with digital, English and technical skills there will be a greater focus on retention going into 2023. This comes as candidates re-evaluate what they want from the workplace, with a recent study suggesting up to 73% of employees in Thailand would consider moving roles if salaries don’t increase. Candidates are also weighing up the pros and cons of higher salaries versus professional development opportunities. We call this the “earn vs learn dilemma.” Whilst higher salaries are attractive in the short term, smart employers can attract and retain high-calibre candidates by offering training in business-critical skills, technical skills and leadership skills.Take advantage of 2023’s Thai recruitment trends with JacksonGrantAre you a manufacturing, engineering and technical businesses looking to attract and retain the best talent for your business in Thailand? Our expert consultants get right to the heart of your needs and, using their in-depth knowledge of Thailand’s exciting recruitment market, can build you a recruitment strategy that is both cost-effective and achieves the right outcomes for your business.Whether you're based locally or are an overseas organisation looking to break into the Thai markets, we can find high-quality candidates who are knowledgeable in international and local engineering, supply chain, manufacturing, infrastructure, life sciences and digital & technology industries.Get in touch to set up a free consultation or submit a job vacancy today.

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Meet the Newest Member of JacksonGrant’s Management Team: Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn
Meet the Newest Member of JacksonGrant’s Management Team: Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn
Jan
8

To support JacksonGrant’s plans for future growth, veteran recruiter Sureeporn Thumvachiraporn – Khun Pui – has joined the agency as Director of Customer Success. With a 20-year career in recruiting, Khun Pui brings a wealth of experience to the team.In this week’s blog, she discusses the benefits of working for a close-knit agency, and JacksonGrant’s game-changing Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) strategy. A New Job Title, A New RoleI joined JacksonGrant in the third quarter of 2022, in anticipation of the rebranding initiative. It was a huge career move. I left a big global consulting firm where I had worked for more than 17 years, as Associate Director of Recruitment. Now I am embarking on a new journey with JacksonGrant in a newly created role: Director of Customer Success. I am responsible for providing client support in day-to-day operations, strategic business growth development, and maintaining profitability. I am also the team leader for important Retail client accounts.I feel lucky to have this new job with JacksonGrant. I am excited about managing a new team, and serving as project manager on key accounts.Making the Move from a Giant Global Agency Previously in my career, I specialised in Finance, Accounting, and HR, with a global consultancy firm that has many divisions and offices throughout the world. It was a wide-ranging role that required a different kind of focus and perspective than the more personal, close-knit culture we have at JacksonGrant.JacksonGrant is a smaller organisation, but what hasn’t changed is that I still manage a motivated team of recruitment professionals dedicated to helping our clients succeed. I am coaching junior consultants with lots of on-the-job training. It takes a lot of attention and care to build and mentor my team. I show them the best way to handle candidates and clients, ensure industry best practices are followed, and advise them how to manage different (and sometimes difficult!) personalities. A Refreshing Office CultureAt my old job, it was impossible to know everyone in the company.At JacksonGrant everyone is very close, we all know each other. It’s very easy to communicate with the MD because he sits right next to me! It’s an open office environment, it does not feel like a hierarchical culture: everyone is very approachable.When I see junior staff struggling to find a solution to a challenge, I will suggest taking a different approach, depending on the client or candidate involved. At the same time, I can freely share my opinions and expertise with our executive leadership, and I feel it is always valued and appreciated. All this makes it easier to get help and support from the team if you get stuck in a search.More Advanced Search TechnologyJacksonGrant may be a smaller agency, but we have more advanced search technology here than my previous employer. I am learning more about how technology can better support recruitment and client service.There is more robust database support, better information available about clients and candidates, and we consistently track candidates even after they’ve been considered for a position. This helps us build more effective talent pools, giving JacksonGrant access to a wider variety and greater number of candidates. Recruitment as a Service (RaaS): A More Personalised & Sustainable Business ModelThe main difference between JacksonGrant and bigger, global firms is the contractual relationship that we have with clients. Under the sprawling, global consultancy model, I worked strictly on contingency. JacksonGrant’s revolutionary Recruitment as a Service (RaaS) is a different type of mutually beneficial arrangement. Clients can secure an exclusive relationship with JacksonGrant for a fixed monthly subscription fee. Our team of experts work closely with each client on their account, with the aim of developing a much closer, long-term relationship. With an RaaS subscription, consultants can work more assuredly and harmoniously with clients. We find that greater shared mutual interest results in a more long-term, sustainable business relationship. JacksonGrant works together with our clients more like partners, in contrast to traditional headhunting agencies.One of the main benefits of the RaaS model is the increased attention we can give to filling less high-profile roles. With a subscription, clients are assured that recruiters make a strong commitment to source small or junior roles that often are ignored by the big agencies who work on contingency. In the recruitment business, consultants at global organisations do not have much incentive to prioritise searches for lower-salaried roles. Junior management roles in SouthEast Asia may not pay a big salary, but these roles are crucially important for regional businesses. Because the contingency fees are fairly low for finding candidates for junior positions, headhunters at worldwide agencies often do not give these searches the attention that clients deserve. But with RaaS, junior roles that need to be filled are bundled together as part of a bigger subscription package that includes executive recruitment. At JacksonGrant, each and every job vacancy merits the attention of experienced recruiters.Candidates, meanwhile, won’t notice the difference between RaaS and contingency job-hunting: they will receive the same award-winning service and personal attention as always. Our goal in 2023 is to encourage more clients to subscribe to our unique RaaS offering. We are confident that is the best way to ensure customer success, deliver the best results possible, and sustain a long term, mutually beneficial partnership between client and recruiter.For more information please feel free to check out the JacksonGrant website at JacksonGrant.io or reach out to our Linkedin at Jackson Grant Recruitment Co., Ltd.

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